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Many Voices One Valley 2007

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  • 1.  
  • 2.  
  • 3. Many Voices One Valley 2007
    • Many Voices One Valley 2007
      • Discusses what people think about living and working in Mid-Hudson Valley
      • Details residents’ priorities for future
      • Makes comparisons made to five years ago
    • Making Ends Meet
      • Impressions of affordability of Mid-Hudson region
      • How residents experience wide range of issues which affect their family finances
    • Health Matters
      • Perceptions of quality of health care in region
      • Tracks factors that influence ability of people to afford and access care
  • 4. How the Survey Was Conducted
    • Mid-Hudson Valley as a region and county level analysis
      • Columbia
      • Dutchess
      • Greene
      • Orange
      • Putnam
      • Sullivan
      • Ulster
    • Sample size: 4,320
    • The margin of error for Mid-Hudson Valley residents is ±1.5%
    • Seven county samples were combined and weighted to reflect population distribution of entire region
    • Random digit dial (RDD) probability design telephone survey
    • Representative samples drawn from each county
    • Eligibility
      • 18 or older
      • Resident of Mid-Hudson Valley
      • Random household selection
      • English or Spanish speaking
  • 5. How to Use Survey Data
    • Identify Trends
      • MVOV 2007 and 2002
    • Program Planning
      • Set priorities
      • Direct resources
    • Development
      • Support grant proposals
      • Shape fundraising campaigns
    • Public Education
      • Raise awareness
    • Mood and Context
      • Public priorities
      • Economic outlook
    • Needs of Staff
      • Demography of region
      • Job expectations
  • 6. Residents’ Priorities for the Mid-Hudson Valley
    • In 2007, residents are most concerned about need for affordable health care
    • Making health care more affordable tops list receiving a mean score of 8.0 out of maximum score of 10
    • Accessibility of health insurance also ranks among top five priorities for residents
    Mid-Hudson Valley 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Making health care more affordable 1 8.0 3 7.7 Keeping businesses in the area 2 7.9 1 7.9 Reducing taxes 3 7.9 9 7.3 Improving the quality of the public schools 4 7.8 2 7.8 Making health insurance easier to get 5 7.7 6 7.4 Creating more jobs 6 7.6 5 7.5 Providing services for senior citizens 7 7.6 4 7.5 Making your community safer 8 7.5 10 7.2 Protecting open space 9 7.4 8 7.3 Providing more after-school activities 10 7.4 7 7.3 Improving relations between different racial and ethnic groups 11 7.2 11 7.2 Increasing the amount of affordable housing 12 7.1 13 6.5 Providing more affordable, quality child care 13 6.9 12 6.8 Supporting the arts and providing more cultural events 14 6.8 14 6.5 Improving the quality of the water 15 6.6 15 6.4 Increasing the number of public areas 16 6.4 16 6.2 Increasing or improving public transportation 17 6.4 17 6.1 Slowing growth and development 18 6.4 18 6.1 Reducing homelessness 19 6.2 19 6.0
  • 7. Health Care
  • 8. Health Care
    • Making health care more affordable ranks among top three issues in every county
      • Number one priority for Columbia, Dutchess, Orange, and Ulster Counties
    • Five years ago, making health insurance easier to get ranked sixth with an average rating of 7.4. This year, it ranks fifth with an average score of 7.7
      • Appears among seven highest priorities in each county
    Making Health Care More Affordable 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 1 8.0 3 7.7 Columbia 1 7.9 2 7.6 Dutchess 1 8.0 3 7.7 Greene 3 7.6 3 7.6 Orange 1 8.0 4 7.7 Putnam 3 7.6 7 7.3 Sullivan 2 7.9 na na Ulster 1 8.1 1 8.0 Making Health Insurance Easier to Get 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 5 7.7 6 7.4 Columbia 3 7.7 4 7.3 Dutchess 7 7.6 6 7.3 Greene 6 7.3 7 7.2 Orange 6 7.7 7 7.5 Putnam 6 7.2 9 6.9 Sullivan 4 7.8 na na Ulster 4 7.9 4 7.7
  • 9. Health Care
    • A majority of Mid-Hudson Valley residents, 55%, have a favorable impression of quality of health care services in community
      • Overall, there has been no change in proportion of residents who are satisfied with quality of health care services since 2002
    • 43% of residents believe not enough is being spent on health care services, and 46% think current level of funding is on target
  • 10. Economic Priorities
  • 11. Economic Priorities
    • Keeping businesses in the area and reducing taxes are among leading priorities for residents overall
    • Keeping businesses in the area receives a mean score of 7.9
    • Residents ranked keeping businesses in the area as single highest priority for community in 2002
    • Creating more jobs also ranks among top ten priorities
    Mid-Hudson Valley 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Keeping businesses in the area 2 7.9 1 7.9 Reducing taxes 3 7.9 9 7.3 Creating more jobs 6 7.6 5 7.5
  • 12. Economic Priorities
    • Reducing taxes receives an average score of 7.9
      • This is an increase from average score of 7.3 it received in 2002
    • The need to reduce taxes is now highest ranking priority for Putnam County
    • It ranks as number two in both Columbia and Orange Counties and ranks third in Ulster County
    • Reducing taxes now ranks on list of top six priorities for all seven counties
    Reducing Taxes 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 3 7.9 9 7.3 Columbia 2 7.7 9 7.0 Dutchess 6 7.7 11 7.1 Greene 4 7.5 8 7.0 Orange 2 8.0 10 7.4 Putnam 1 8.1 3 7.6 Sullivan 5 7.8 na na Ulster 3 7.9 9 7.1
  • 13. Economic Priorities
    • With an average score of 7.6, creating more jobs now ranks sixth
    • 58% are not satisfied with the quality of jobs
      • Almost one-quarter of residents describe the quality of jobs as poor
      • About one-third considers quality of jobs to be only fair
    • Just 39% describe quality of jobs in region favorably
    Creating More Jobs 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 6 7.6 5 7.5 Columbia 7 7.3 5 7.2 Dutchess 5 7.7 5 7.5 Greene 7 7.3 5 7.4 Orange 8 7.7 6 7.6 Putnam 9 6.9 8 7.1 Sullivan 3 7.9 na na Ulster 6 7.9 6 7.5
  • 14. Economic Priorities
    • 54% believe community allocates too few resources toward improving jobs
    • A little over one-third believes community spending toward goal is about right
  • 15. Priorities that Affect Children
  • 16. Priorities that Affect Children
    • Improving quality of public schools receives an average score of 7.8, the same rating it received in 2002
    • Ranks fourth overall among Mid-Hudson Valley residents
    • After-school activities and child care are also important issues
    Mid-Hudson Valley 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Improving the quality of the public schools 4 7.8 2 7.8 Providing more after-school activities 10 7.4 7 7.3 Providing more affordable, quality child care 13 6.9 12 6.8
  • 17. Priorities that Affect Children
    • Public education ranks among four highest priorities in every county except Sullivan County where it is sixth
    • Mid-Hudson Valley residents feel positively about quality of schools in community
      • Just one in ten considers them to be excellent
      • Only 8% describe them as poor
    • Residents’ assessments of the quality of public schools have remained fairly constant since 2002
    Improving the Quality of the Public Schools 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 4 7.8 2 7.8 Columbia 4 7.6 1 7.7 Dutchess 3 7.9 2 7.9 Greene 2 7.6 2 7.8 Orange 4 7.8 2 7.9 Putnam 4 7.5 2 7.6 Sullivan 6 7.7 na na Ulster 2 8.0 3 7.9
  • 18. Priorities that Affect Children
    • A majority of Mid-Hudson Valley residents are satisfied with amount community allocates toward improving public schools
    • Three in ten residents think community does not spend enough on public education
    • 15% believe too much money is being spent
  • 19. Services for Senior Citizens
  • 20. Services for Senior Citizens
    • Mid-Hudson Valley residents rank services for senior citizens among top ten priorities
    • Half feel positively about quality of services available to seniors
    Providing Services for Senior Citizens 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 7 7.6 4 7.5 Columbia 6 7.5 6 7.2 Dutchess 9 7.5 4 7.5 Greene 8 7.2 4 7.5 Orange 5 7.7 3 7.7 Putnam 5 7.3 5 7.4 Sullivan 9 7.4 na na Ulster 7 7.7 5 7.5
  • 21. Crime
  • 22. Crime
    • Most residents are satisfied with job community is doing to protect them from crime
    • There has been a slight increase in proportion of residents who think community is only doing a fair or poor job
    Making Your Community Safer 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 8 7.5 10 7.2 Columbia 12 6.7 12 6.5 Dutchess 4 7.7 8 7.3 Greene 9 7.0 9 6.8 Orange 7 7.7 5 7.6 Putnam 8 7.0 11 6.8 Sullivan 10 7.3 na na Ulster 11 7.2 11 7.1
  • 23. The Environment
  • 24. The Environment
    • Protecting open space continues to be among residents’ top ten priorities
    • Other environmental issues, such as water quality, public areas, and slowing growth are lower on list
    Mid-Hudson Valley Residents 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Protecting open space 9 7.4 8 7.3 Improving the quality of the water 15 6.6 15 6.4 Increasing the number of public areas 16 6.4 16 6.2 Slowing growth and development 18 6.4 18 6.1
  • 25. Housing Housing
  • 26. Housing
    • Increasing affordable housing receives score of 7.1
      • Represents considerable increase from average rating of 6.5 received in 2002
    Increasing the Amount of Affordable Housing 2007 2002 Rank Mean Rank Mean Mid-Hudson Valley 12 7.1 13 6.5 Columbia 10 7.0 13 6.3 Dutchess 12 7.2 13 6.5 Greene 12 6.4 13 6.1 Orange 12 7.2 15 6.6 Putnam 12 6.5 17 6.0 Sullivan 12 6.9 na na Ulster 12 7.1 13 6.8
  • 27. Housing
    • 70% of Mid-Hudson Valley residents are dissatisfied with amount of affordable housing in community
    • The proportion of residents who describe the cost of housing as poor has increased by eleven percentage points, from 23% in 2002 to 34% today
    • 58% believe community should allocate more resources for improving affordability of housing in region
  • 28. Continuity & Change in the Past Five Years
  • 29. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • 77% believe they can have at least a moderate impact on place in which they live
    • 88% of residents generally feel positively about life in community
    • 51% view volunteerism as best way to make a difference
  • 30. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • 60% of residents in region believe decision makers see things differently than public
    • Only 35% think leaders in community are in touch with public
    • In 2002, 50% felt a disconnect between decision makers and public, and 43% felt decision makers were in step with public
  • 31. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • Proportion of residents in Dutchess, Putnam, and Sullivan Counties who feel leaders are disconnected is double or nearly double the proportion of people who feel leaders are in touch
  • 32. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • Many new residents have moved to the area since the last survey
      • 2002 average length of residence: 25 years
      • 2007 average length of residence: 23 years
    • Two-thirds of all current residents have lived in the area for more than a decade
    • About one in five residents has moved to their community in the past five years
    New Residents Mid-Hudson Valley Row % Column % Column % Mid-Hudson Valley 21% 100% 100% Columbia 16% 4% 4% Dutchess 19% 25% 27% Greene 20% 3% 3% Orange 24% 39% 34% Putnam 23% 10% 9% Sullivan 23% 7% 7% Ulster 16% 12% 16%
  • 33. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • New residents are generally young
    • 16% are Latino and 16% are born outside the United States
    • African Americans make up 11% of people who are new to their community
    New Residents Mid-Hudson Valley Row % Column % Column % Mid-Hudson Valley 21% 100% 100% Under 35 36% 45% 26% White 18% 69% 83% African American 30% 11% 7% Latino 34% 16% 10% Born in another country 39% 16% 8% Less than college 18% 56% 65% College graduate 26% 44% 35% Children in household 24% 52% 44% Dual income household 22% 55% 51% Less than $50,000 20% 39% 42% $50,000 or more 23% 61% 58% $100,000 or more 21% 24% 24% Property owner 17% 59% 73%
  • 34. Continuity and Change in the Past Five Years
    • In 2002, 39% of registered voters were Republicans compared with 32% who were Democrats, and 24% who were not enrolled in any political party
    • Today, proportion of registered Republicans, Democrats, and non-enrolled voters is about even
  • 35. Plans for the Future Plans for the Future
  • 36. Residents’ Plans for the Future
    • 29% of residents intend to relocate
    • Half of those residents who intend to leave plan to do so because of economic reasons
    • Top economic reasons:
      • 17% of residents planning to leave cite cost of living, 17% point to taxes, and 12% mention jobs
    • Top non-economic reasons:
      • 8% mention climate, 7% think it’s time for change, 6% cite overcrowding, and the same proportion mentions quality of life
    Why Leaving Mid-Hudson Valley? 2007 Residents who plan to move in next 5 years
  • 37. Making Ends Meet
  • 38. Making Ends Meet
    • There is a consensus that the region is not a very affordable place to live
    • 64% of residents say Mid-Hudson region is unaffordable
  • 39. Making Ends Meet
    • Cost of gasoline
      • 77% report their family finances have been stretched considerably by high cost of fuel
    • Heat and electricity
      • 63% think cost of heat and electricity places a heavy burden on household finances
  • 40. Making Ends Meet
    • Property taxes
      • 58% describe cost of property taxes as placing financial stress on their monthly budget
    • Rent or mortgage
      • 53% find it difficult to meet these payments each month
    • Health insurance
      • 41% experience financial difficulty paying for health insurance
  • 41. Making Ends Meet
    • Health care costs
      • Over one-third report household medical expenses place a great deal or good amount of stress on finances
    • Paying or saving for private school or college
      • 33% say tuition costs place either a great deal or a good amount of strain on family finances
    • Child care
      • About one in ten struggle to pay for child care
    • Cost of public transportation
      • 8% have difficulty meeting monthly expenses for this purpose
  • 42. Working in the Mid-Hudson Valley
  • 43. Working in the Mid-Hudson Valley
    • 55% of Mid-Hudson Valley households have at least two jobs
      • This includes households where two adult earners work as well as those households where one adult holds more than one job
    • 77% of households with income of $100,000 or more hold at least two jobs
      • This includes nearly one-third of these households with three or more jobs
  • 44. Working in the Mid-Hudson Valley
    • Average work week: 43.1 hours
    • Average commute: 28.0 minutes
    • In order to earn more, many are working long hours, or enduring a long commute
  • 45. Working in the Mid-Hudson Valley
    • 60% think it would be difficult to find similar work within the same distance from their home as their current position if they were to lose their job
  • 46. Renting but Hoping to Own
  • 47. Renting but Hoping to Own
    • 29% rent their home or apartment
    • 65% of renters find making their rent payment difficult
  • 48. Renting but Hoping to Own
    • 49% of renters express interest in homeownership someday, 51% do not
    • 57% of people who rent think they are priced out of homeownership
    • 55% of renters who want to buy a home believe it likely they will be able to afford a home but 45% doubt they will be able to afford a home
    • 53% of renters who are interested in purchasing a home plan to move out of the region if they cannot afford to buy one in the area
  • 49. Renting but Hoping to Own
  • 50. People Doing Without
  • 51. People Doing Without
    • Although most Mid-Hudson Valley residents have not experienced economic hardships, 24% of residents mention at least one
  • 52. Health Matters
  • 53. Health Matters
    • 24% of households have a member who has not had continuous health insurance in the past year
    • Using the U.S. Census, this is 96,250 of estimated 401,049 households
    • 12% of households have at least one member currently without health insurance or approximately 48,125 households
    • 15% of households with children include a member under age eighteen that has not had the benefit of continuous health insurance
    • 7% of Mid-Hudson Valley households with children have at least one uninsured child
  • 54. Households with Gaps in Health Insurance Coverage
    • 31% of households in both Columbia and Ulster counties have not had continuous coverage over past year
    • Putnam County has smallest proportion of households without current or continuous health insurance at 14%
  • 55. Households with Gaps in Health Insurance Coverage High Rate Low Rate Percent Gap in Insurance
  • 56. Households Currently Without Health Insurance
    • Columbia, Greene, Sullivan, and Ulster Counties have highest rate of uninsured households in region
    • 12% in Orange County and 10% in Dutchess County do not have continuous health coverage for all their members
    • 7% currently lack coverage in Putnam County
  • 57. Households Currently Without Health Insurance High Rate Low Rate Percent Currently Uninsured
  • 58. Priced Out?
    • About one-third says cost of medical expenses places financial stress on household finances
    • Cost of health care puts strain on monthly budgets
      • 54% of uninsured households
      • 47% of households without continuous coverage
      • 51% of residents with a disability
    • About four in ten report paying for health insurance inflicts at least a good deal of stress on monthly budgets
  • 59. Going Without Because of Cost
    • 11% did not visit a doctor because they could not pay for it
      • Uninsured residents are three times more likely to skip a visit to a doctor because of cost
      • Households that experienced a gap in health care coverage over the past year are two and a half times more likely to miss a visit to the doctor
    • 10% did not buy needed medicine because they could not afford it
      • 30% of households without health insurance and 26% of households that have had gaps in coverage did not buy needed medication
  • 60. Conclusions
    • The most pressing issues include health care costs, strength of the economy, taxes, and the quality of public education
      • Residents are now much more concerned about health care costs than they were in 2002
      • They feel priced out by property taxes
    • Most people in the Mid-Hudson region think the area is unaffordable for the average family
      • Many Mid-Hudson Valley residents are dependent on more than one wage earner or are working more than one job, working long hours, or enduring a long commute
      • Nearly six in ten residents are not satisfied with the jobs available in the region
      • Many worry that if they were to lose their job, they would have a difficult time finding a comparable position within the same distance from their home
    • Many Mid-Hudson Valley residents are struggling to pay for health care and health insurance
      • 24% have not had continuous coverage over the past year
      • 12% are currently uninsured
  • 61. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 62. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 63. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 64. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 65. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 66. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 67. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 68. www.ManyVoicesOneValley.org
  • 69.
    • Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director, Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    • Dr. Barbara L. Carvalho, Director, Marist Poll
    • Marist College
    • 3399 North Road
    • Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
    • (845) 575-5050
    • Founded in 1978, the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion (MIPO) is a survey research center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The Marist Poll has conducted independent research on public priorities, elections, and a wide variety of issues including the economy, health care, foreign affairs, the environment, science, information technology, and lifestyles. Through the regular public release of surveys, MIPO has built a legacy of independence, reliability, and accuracy. Frequently cited by journalists, public officials, and policy experts, the Marist Poll has been recognized for fairness, accuracy, and timeliness. Its results are featured in print and electronic media throughout the world.
  • 70.
    • Diana M. Gurieva, Executive Vice President
    • Stephen Densmore, Press Liaison
    • The Dyson Foundation 25 Halcyon Road Millbrook, NY 12545-9611 (845) 677-0644
    • Established in 1957, the Dyson Foundation is a private, family-directed grantmaking foundation led by Robert R. Dyson, who has served as the Foundation’s President since 2000.  Headquartered in Millbrook, the Foundation awards grants through a diverse regional funding program serving the Mid-Hudson Valley. The Foundation’s assets stand at approximately $354 million and, in 2006, it awarded grants in excess of $18.4 million.
  • 71.