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Brand Management - Levis Brand Exploratory and Inventory
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Brand Management - Levis Brand Exploratory and Inventory

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This is a two-part presentation my team created for our Brand Management class to assess Levi’s brand equity and marketing programs.

This is a two-part presentation my team created for our Brand Management class to assess Levi’s brand equity and marketing programs.


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Transcript

  • 1. Part 1: BrandExploratory
    Eddie Burns, Alex Heide, Prachi Mishra, Stephanie Ryan,
    Heather Rybak, & Sara Wight
  • 2. Agenda
  • 3. Background Info
    • Founded in 1853 in San Francisco, California
    • 4. Clothing for the blue-collar working male
    • 5. Target Market: 15-25 year-olds
    • 6. Central Product: 501 jeans
    • 7. Sold in 110 countries worldwide & continues to be a top selling jean brand
  • Secondary Research Methodology
    • “Case 9 Dockers: Creating a Sub-Brand” from Keller’s Best Practice Cases in Branding : Lessons from the World's Strongest Brands
    • 8. Levi’s Company Website
    • 9. Mintel Reports on Denim Industry
    • 10. Business Source Premier
    • 11. Encyclopedia of Major Marketing Campaigns
    • 12. Market Share Reporter 2010
    • 13. Levi’s Facebook Fan Page
  • Primary Research Methodology
    • Survey
    • 14. Distributed via Facebook
    • 15. 7 Questions focused on brand recall, behavioral loyalty, brand imagery in addition to Aaker’s “Big Five” dimensions
    • 16. Captured demographic information, brand salience, imagery & resonance
    • 17. 315 responses, 27% response rate
    • 18. ZMET Technique
    • 19. 10 participants, age range of 20 to 64 years
    • 20. Assessed higher-level associations
    • 21. Trip to Levi’s Store
  • Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 22. Salience
    • Secondary & Primary Research (Survey)
    Top of Mind:
    • 40% listed Levi’s first, the next nearest was Seven Jeans, listed by 8%
    • 23. 63% listed Levi’s in the top 3 brands of jeans
  • Salience
  • 24. Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 25. Performance
    • 3 Aspects of Performance
    • 26. Reliability: Consumer approval has declined
    • 27. ZMET: Participant praised Levi’s for jeans that fit well & look good
    • 28. Facebook Fan Page: Disappointed in Levi’s products since outsourced manufacturing
    • 29. Durability: 7 out of 10 mentioned long product life
    • 30. Serviceability: Less important relative to durability
  • Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 31. Imagery
    • User Profiles:
    • 32. Masculine
    • 33. Dual Imagery: Middle-to-Upper Class to Blue Collar
    • 34. Purchase & Usage Situations: Casual & Informal
    • 35. Personality & Values:
    • 36. Aaker’s “Big Five”: Highest ranking on “ruggedness”
    • 37. 2004 Brand Personality Study: Strong, favorable but not unique
  • Imagery
  • 38. Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 39. Judgments
    • Quality:
    • 40. ZMET: “Affordable, Good Value, Durable & Quality”
    • 41. Credibility:
    • 42. ZMET: 6 out of 10 included “Classic, Original, Traditional”
    • 43. ZMET: Expertise as first denim manufacturer
    • 44. Consideration & Superiority: Disparity with older & younger segments
  • Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 45. Feelings
    • Warmth, Security, Self-respect: Older Segments
    • 46. Excitement: Younger Segments
    • 47. Social Approval:Both Segments, difference among older & younger
    “With Levi’s, you always know what you are going to get & it is satisfying in the same way comfort food is.”
  • 48. Consumer-Based Brand Equity Pyramid
  • 49. Resonance
    • Behavioral Loyalty:
    • 50. ZMET: Repeat purchases from older segment
    • 51. Attitudinal Attachment:
    • 52. ZMET: “Levi’s fit my lifestyle” – mentioned by older segment but not young
    • 53. Sense of Community:
    • 54. ZMET: Stronger sense of community with older segment
    • 55. Active Engagement:
    • 56. Facebook Fan Page: Stronger amongst younger segment
  • Levi’s Facebook Fan Page
    • 1,700,243 Fans
    • 57. Approximately 20 new posts per day
  • American Cultural Representation
    • Levi’s is associated with American culture: 5.88
    • 58. Levi’s is an icon of American culture: 5.55
    • 59. Levi’s is a symbol of American culture: 4.91
  • Major Inconsistent Associations
    • Original/Conformity
    • 60. Cheap/Expensive
    • 61. Sexy/Casual
    • 62. High Fashion/Blue Collar
  • Questions?
  • 63. Thank You!
  • 64. Part 2: Brand Inventory
    Eddie Burns, Alex Heide, Prachi Mishra, Stephanie Ryan,
    Heather Rybak, & Sara Wight
  • 65. Agenda
  • 66. Part 1 Key Takeaways
  • 67. Brand Positioning
  • 68. 24 Month History
  • 69. Campaign Objectives:
    “Buff the image of the Levi’s brand” as sensible and genuine
    Make brand relative to contemporary youth through American association and reflection of current political and economic climate
  • 70.
  • 71.
  • 72.
  • 73.
  • 74.
  • 75.
  • 76. Interview with Braddock Mayor John Fetterman
  • 77.
  • 78.
  • 79.
  • 80. Recommendations
    More Heavily Emphasize CSR Element of Braddock
    • Sell “I Braddock” shirts in Levi’s Store
    • 81. Use Braddock Sundance films material in all communications
  • Recommendations Cont’d.
    Make Curve ID imagery more consistent with Levi’s brand
    Increase clarity and consistency of the Curve ID marketing communications
  • 82. Recommendations Cont’d.
    Maintain consistent brand associations throughout all marketing communications efforts
  • 83. Questions?
  • 84. Thank You!