Reva Joshee
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,
University of Toronto
Canadian Context
10 Provinces, 3 Territories
Multiculturalism and human rights policies at both
federal and provincial/ter...
Canadian Multiculturalism
Multiculturalism and citizenship
New citizens at Citizenship
Ceremony Former Governor General
speaking at Citizenship
Cere...
Cultural Identity
Prime Minister attending an event
in the Korean Canadian
Community
Cultural Enrichment
Children in German bilingual
class in Edmonton Children in Mandarin
language class in Edmonton
Social Justice
Poster for the National
Campaign against racism
Members of the National
Council Against racism
Canada and Human Rights
Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Human Rights Acts
— Canadian Human Rights
Act
— Provincial Human Rights
Acts
— Employment Equity
Foundation of Canadian Values
— • Sharing
— • Caring
— • Respect
— • Accountability
— • Truth (and its plurality)
— • Fair...
Research shows…
— There is an almost complete absence of immigrant
or visible or religious minority ghettos in Canada.
Tod...
There are at least two broad implications for the place
of visible minorities in Canadian society as a result of
these dem...
Research shows…
— There is growing evidence from cross-
national studies that Canada outperforms
other countries on a wide...
Canadian diversity model
— Canada’s “diversity model” depends on citizens recognizing
the legitimacy of value positions di...
Toward social inclusion
— Practices that identify a balance between different
values
— A strong public sphere is needed as...
The Future?
rjoshee@oise.utoronto.ca
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Human rights and social inclusion in canada; understanding the relationship between diversity and prosperity reva joshee, global hr forum 2010, seoul, korea

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There have long been debates about how and whether cultural diversity, human rights, and prosperity are linked. Some have argued that attention to cultural diversity gives prominence to group rights and endangers individual rights. Others have called attention to the false dichotomy between individual and group rights, especially as it pertains to equality rights. Some have claimed that cultural diversity leads to segregation and impedes the development of prosperity within communities and nations. Others have noted that cultural diversity is an asset that helps to build prosperity. This presentation will use the example to Canada to examine various claims about cultural diversity and its relationship to both human rights and prosperity.
Canada has a long tradition of acknowledging cultural diversity and human rights in official policy. I will begin by discussing the history of these two areas in Canada and placing them in a global and international context. I will then examine some of the research on cultural diversity and prosperity to draw out key issues in Canada. Finally, I will make the argument that a social inclusion approach to cultural diversity is both realistic and necessary on the grounds of promoting both human rights and economic development.

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Human rights and social inclusion in canada; understanding the relationship between diversity and prosperity reva joshee, global hr forum 2010, seoul, korea

  1. 1. Reva Joshee Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
  2. 2. Canadian Context 10 Provinces, 3 Territories Multiculturalism and human rights policies at both federal and provincial/territorial levels
  3. 3. Canadian Multiculturalism
  4. 4. Multiculturalism and citizenship New citizens at Citizenship Ceremony Former Governor General speaking at Citizenship Ceremony
  5. 5. Cultural Identity Prime Minister attending an event in the Korean Canadian Community
  6. 6. Cultural Enrichment Children in German bilingual class in Edmonton Children in Mandarin language class in Edmonton
  7. 7. Social Justice Poster for the National Campaign against racism Members of the National Council Against racism
  8. 8. Canada and Human Rights
  9. 9. Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  10. 10. Human Rights Acts — Canadian Human Rights Act — Provincial Human Rights Acts — Employment Equity
  11. 11. Foundation of Canadian Values — • Sharing — • Caring — • Respect — • Accountability — • Truth (and its plurality) — • Fairness — • Responsibility — • Engagement — • Diversity (e.g. culture, religion, lifestyle) Hay and Varga-Toth, 2006
  12. 12. Research shows… — There is an almost complete absence of immigrant or visible or religious minority ghettos in Canada. Today, as throughout Canadian history, immigrants often choose to live in neighbourhoods where co-ethnics already reside. But these areas of residential concentration do not exhibit the economic impoverishment, impaired mobility or social isolation that characterize ghettos in the U.S. or Europe. Kymlicka, 2010
  13. 13. There are at least two broad implications for the place of visible minorities in Canadian society as a result of these demographic and economic shifts. On the one hand, increasing the diversity of Canada’s population brings with it possibilities for new ideas and expanded trade networks. On the other hand, minorities can also be subject to explicit or implicit discrimination, which counteracts advantages they may hold. Cardozo and Pendakur, 2008 Research shows…
  14. 14. Research shows… — There is growing evidence from cross- national studies that Canada outperforms other countries on a wide range of measures for immigrant and minority integration. Kymlicka, 2010
  15. 15. Canadian diversity model — Canada’s “diversity model” depends on citizens recognizing the legitimacy of value positions different from their own. CPRN’s research suggests that Canadians accommodate diversity by compromising between sets of competing values. These competing values are arrayed along one of four dimensions: — Uniformity Heterogeneity — Symmetry Asymmetry — Economic freedom Economic security — Group rights Individual rights Hay and Varga-Toth, 2007
  16. 16. Toward social inclusion — Practices that identify a balance between different values — A strong public sphere is needed as a space of deliberation. It requires public institutions that can integrate and include minorities. — The “good functioning” of Canada’s diversity model depends upon an on-going dialogue in the public sphere, one that accepts difference of opinion and seeks to include rather than exclude Jenson, 2002
  17. 17. The Future?
  18. 18. rjoshee@oise.utoronto.ca

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