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Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
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Globalization, corporate strategies and the future of work philip brown & hugh lauder, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea

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The global economic downturn has reinforced the idea that future prosperity depends on winning a competitive advantage in the global knowledge-driven economy. This view is reflected in the central …

The global economic downturn has reinforced the idea that future prosperity depends on winning a competitive advantage in the global knowledge-driven economy. This view is reflected in the central role of education and skills in national economic and social policy. Not only are they seen to hold the key to a competitive economy but to the foundation of social justice and social cohesion. This talk will examine these policy assumptions drawing on key findings from a major funded study of global corporate strategies and the future of work, involving leading transnational companies and policy-makers from seven countries: China, Germany, India, Korea, Singapore, United States and the United Kingdom. It will examine some of the latest trends that are shaping the global supply of university graduates and the demand for ‘knowledge’ workers. It will also examine the rise of a ‘global auction’ for cut-priced brainpower and considers its implications for education, job creation and social justice.

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  • 1. Phillip Brown - Cardiff University & Hugh Lauder - University of Bath Global HR Forum 2010 , Seoul, 26-28 October Globalization, Corporate Strategies and the Future of Work.
  • 2. Technological Evolution Knowledge Economy Quality Jobs for All The Age of Human Capital - Education, Jobs and Rewards; Comparative Advantage: ◦ Developed Economies = Quality (Brain) ◦ Developing Economies = Price (Body)
  • 3. ‘In the past, material forces were dominant in national growth, prestige, and power; now products of the mind take precedence…The result is a new and productive partnership between “head” nations, which design products, and “body” nations, which manufacture them’ R.Rosecrance, The Rise of the Virtual State, 1999.
  • 4. High Skills ‘Magnet’ Economy • More Higher Education • Raising Quality Standards • Innovation and R&D • Foreign Talent Efficiency & Justice ‘Learning = Earning’
  • 5. • Thomas Friedman’s ‘The World is Flat’? • The World is Uneven, Fragmented & Uncertain • Promise of Education, Jobs & Rewards (Knowledge Economy)? • Global Auction for Quality Jobs = Dual Auction: •Forward/Progressive (High Skills, High Wages) •Reverse/Dutch (High Skills, Low Wages) • Challenges/Opportunities?
  • 6. Argument Based on Several Years of Research; Examine Views of Transnational Companies; Examine Views of Senior Policy-Makers, including China & India.
  • 7. Seven Countries - Britain, China, Germany, India, Singapore, South Korea, and the United States; Core Sectors – Automotive, Financial Services and ITC/Telecoms; Company Interviews: 125 company interviews = 105 outside of UK; Policy Interviews: 65 policy interviews = 43 outside UK.
  • 8. • Enrolments in Tertiary Education Doubled Within a Decade from 72 to 136 million (1996-2007); • China Overtaken US with Over 20 Million in HE (2006). Now 27 Million Enrolled in HE; • China’s Talent Plan, Extra 100 million College Educated in Next 10 Years; • Over 60 Percent of Engineering Doctorates were Awarded to Foreign Students in Both American and Britain.
  • 9. ‘We have an “inside out”, not outside in model which is very clever. It gives us more flexibility over what to do where’ Senior Indian Manager, EU Electronics, Mumbai ‘What is really different here is research, we generate ideas for the frontline to use…These are the areas that we find that talent is delivering to an even higher standard than expected. We’re not doing those menial call centre type jobs. It’s global work and that’s where we think we’ve been able to add a lot more value than what was initially expected and that will continue.’ Senior Indian manager, US Bank, Mumbai
  • 10. Add picture of man with sewing machine
  • 11. • Knowledge Work Working Knowledge • Simplify Codify Standardise Digitalise ‘Standardisation in terms of IT has become huge…not only standards for a single customer but across countries…technology is the ultimate equaliser…it will drive globalisation, drive change…I hope that people don’t get reduced to the state of drones…but I think increasingly employment will shrink.’ Chief Information Office, Financial Services.
  • 12. Developers (creators) Demonstrators (executioners) Drones (digital routine)
  • 13. Emphasis on ‘Top Talent’; Being Good is No Longer Good Enough; Performance Not Simply Skills. ‘It’s more important to get great talent, since the differential value created by the most talented knowledge workers is enormous.’ McKinsey Consultants.
  • 14. Global Skill Webs  • Competitive Advantage Through People  ‘Leverage’ Global Supply of Skills, Knowledge,  Talent., etc.; • Value Created Through Webs of Skills/Capability that  Cut Across Traditional Relationships Between  Employees, Suppliers, Companies, Universities, etc. • Internationalisation/De‐nationalisation of HR  Strategies; • TNCs Globalization of ‘Quality’ Jobs, but at a Price  Knowledge Arbitrage.
  • 15. Global Supply/Demand for High Skills is Unprecedented; Rapid Innovation in Some Emerging Economies but Global Youth Unemployment at Record High; Not Enough of the ‘Quality’ Jobs that People Want: ◦ Learning = Earning Crisis of Expectations. ◦ What is a Quality Job? ◦ Making a Living versus Earning a Living.
  • 16. Human Capital Theory Meets the Laws of Diminishing Returns; Expansion of HE is No Longer a Source of Competitive Advantage, but ◦ Universities Key to ‘Innovation’; ◦ Re-Engineer Links Between Local Supply and Global Demand. Creativity is Sabotaged in ‘High-Stake Tournaments’ (Mistakes, Playfulness, etc. )
  • 17. What is Talent? Do We Need A Democratization of Talent? Reconnecting Prosperity and Social Justice: ◦ The Limits of the Labor Market; ◦ Age Old Questions: Who Does What? Who Gets What? We All Need to do Some Real Knowledge Work!
  • 18. The Global Auction: The Broken Promises of Education, Jobs and Incomes Oxford University Press:New York. November, 2010. P.Brown, H.Lauder and D.Ashton.

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