Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Global hr forum2009-william f. miller-the green economy and competitive clusters

385

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
385
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. “The Green Economy and Competitive Clusters” Global HR Forum Seoul, Korea November 5, 2009 William F.Miller Co-director, Stanford Program on Regions of President and CEO Emeritus Innovation and Entrepreneurship SRI International Herbert Hoover Professor of Public & Private Management Emeritus Chairman Emeritus Borland Software Corporation Professor of Computer Science Emeritus Chairman and Founder Former Provost Nanostellar, Inc. Stanford University Chairman and Founder Honorary Dean Lumiette, Inc. William F. Miller School of Management of Technology Konkuk University, Seoul Korea Managing Partner Actium Ventures LLC wmiller@stanford.edu
  • 2. Steps toward high tech clusters: Building a Green Economy To effectively build new high tech clusters a region must have: a. The fundamental resources for a high tech economy i.e. Research and research trained scientists and engineers that create the innovations b. Entrepreneurs who turn these innovations into business c. A “habitat”, i.e. a business, social, and political environment that facilitates entrepreneurship and breeds entrepreneurs
  • 3. Place and Networks Incremental innovations occur in networks but major innovations that create whole new industries occur at place. What about networks? What are the characteristics of those places that create new industries?
  • 4. The World is Flat? According to Thomas Friedman the world is flat. Indeed there are strong forces of deglommeration that are leveling playing fields and facilitating a broader distribution of the factors of production. At the same time there are forces for agglomeration that are giving rise to concentration of activities in clusters and regions.
  • 5. The world is a waffle On closer inspection the world is a waffle. The peaks are “steeples of excellence” representing excellence and specialization in design, manufacturing, research, marketing, etc. The value of clustering. Comparative advantage no longer accrues to a country, per se, but accrues to a region or locale. Those regions with the highest level of knowledge intensity are the most advantaged.
  • 6. The (Tech) World Isn’t Flat Source: ATP and George Mason University
  • 7. Why Place is important; What Will Happen Where? “Previous rounds of infrastructure improvement always have had a double effect, permitting dispersion of certain routine activities but also increasing the complexity and time-dependence of productive activity, and thus making agglomeration more important. We argue that the Internet will produce more of the same-forces for deagglomeration, but offsetting and possibly stronger tendencies toward agglomeration.” Edward E. Leamer and Michael Storper,”The Economic Geography of the Internet Age”,National Bureau of Economic Research,Working Paper 8450,accepted for publication in the Journal of International Business Studies.
  • 8. Breakthrough Innovations • Innovation is historically location-dependent location- • A handful of US locations have disproportionately contributed breakthrough innovation • Those locations account disproportionately for – Foundational and widely-referenced Patents and widely- academic citations – R&D $$ -- as both recipients and spenders – High-value startups that commercialize risky High- technologies – Successful Initial Public Offerings – Venture returns – Courtesy Michael Borrus, X/Seed Capital
  • 9. Clean Tech Investments: CleanTech investments in Silicon Valley rose 94% 2006 to 2007 to reach $1,100,000,000 CleanTech investments in Silicon Valley amount to 62% of CleanTech investments in California and 21% of such investments in all of US Employment: Since 2000 the number of “green” jobs has risen 41% in Silicon Valley, compared to 17% for the rest of California 43% are in energy generation and 39% in energy efficiency Reference: The 2008 Silicon Valley Index, <www.jointventure.org>
  • 10. US CleanTech in 2008
  • 11. California Green Innovation Index www.next10.org/environment/greeninnovation09
  • 12. Silicon Valley moves toward green Silicon Valley has now become the largest center of cleantech investments in the US. How did it do this?
  • 13. Coming Soon
  • 14. As Entreperneurial regions evolve they develop more of these 14 Features of an Advanced High Tech Entrepreneurial Habitat • Knowledge Intensity • Open business environment • Universities and research institutes that interact • Collaboration: business, effectively with industry government, and non-profits- • Favorable government local networks policies • Specialized business service • Results-oriented meritocracy infrastructure: lawyers, • Flexible and Mobile work accountants, etc. force(dense social networks) • High quality of life • Climate that rewards risk- • Global Linkages taking and tolerates failure • Multi cluster regions • Knowledgeable Venture Capital • Leadership to transform

×