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Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement
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Global hr forum2009-scott_harrison-ofsted, inspection and school improvement

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  • 1. Scott Harrison
  • 2.  Ofsted is the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills.  Ofsted was set up in 1992 to inspect schools but since 2007 the remit has expanded.  All 26,000 stated funded schools are inspected regularly; hundreds of inspections take place each week.  Ofsted costs around £20 million pounds per year.
  • 3. Inspections have evolved over the years:  Smaller teams, focus on particular aspects.  Greater emphasis on self-evaluation.  Shorter notice of inspection.  Proportionate inspection.
  • 4.  Schools are given one week’s notice of inspection.  Lead inspectors plan the inspection using the school’s up-loaded self-evaluation and an analysis of test and examination data.  Inspectors follow ‘inspection trails’ to test out their hypothesis.  Questionnaires are used to gather the views of parents and pupils.  Inspectors observe a sample of lessons.  A report with grades is published on the Ofsted website and is sent to parents by the school.
  • 5.  “The teaching is consistently effective in ensuring that pupils are motivated and engaged. The great majority of teaching is securing good progress and learning. Teachers generally have strong subject knowledge which enthuses and challenges most pupils and contributes to their good progress. Good and imaginative use is made of resources, including new technology to enhance learning. Other adults’ support is well focused and makes a significant contribution to the quality of learning...
  • 6.  ...As a result of good assessment procedures, teachers and other adults plan well to meet the needs of all pupils. Pupils are provided with detailed feedback, both orally and through marking. They know how well they have done and can discuss what they need to do to sustain good progress. Teachers listen to, observe and question groups of pupils during lessons in order to reshape tasks and explanations to improve learning.”
  • 7.  Where inspectors find that a school is failing to provide an acceptable standard of education, it is placed in special measures.  These schools are monitored regularly by HMI.  Of the schools placed in special measures, 85% have improved to become at least adequate.  In the first ten years of Ofsted’s work, 198 schools failed to improve and were closed.
  • 8.  The Framework for Inspection sets clear expectations.  Grade criteria provide schools with benchmarks for self evaluation and development planning.  The use of objective data helps schools analyse the quality of outcomes in absolute and relative terms.  The sharing of good practice provides examples and solutions.
  • 9.  “The teachers had high expectations of pupils‟ enjoyment and achievement. They made conscious efforts to foster a spirit of enquiry, developing pupils‟ reasoning skills through approaches that saw problem-solving and investigation as integral to learning mathematics. They checked that everyone was challenged to think hard and they adapted how they were teaching to achieve this. As a result, their classrooms were vibrant places of learning.”
  • 10.  Ofsted reports on the progress of groups of pupils who commonly underachieve.  “Twelve outstanding schools. Excelling against the odds” provides case studies of schools that have improved in areas of disadvantage. The report comments: “Their achievements do not happen by chance, but by highly reflective, carefully planned and implemented strategies which serve these schools well in meeting the many challenges which obstruct the path to success.”
  • 11.  Ofsted accumulates a large body of evidence upon which advice is based.  It reports on trends and issues ‘without fear or favour’.  As well as providing an overview of the system, surveys probe in detail to report on subjects and aspects of education such as the curriculum.
  • 12.  Does inspection have negative impact on schools?  How can consistency and high quality be maintained across large numbers of inspections?  Is inspection too reliant on published data?  Does inspection restrict innovation and creativity?  Why doesn’t Ofsted provide advice to help schools address identified weaknesses?  Does Ofsted provide good value for money?
  • 13.  Ofsted is popular with parents; most teachers surveyed think their school is likely to improve following an inspection.  Shorter notice of inspection has had significant benefits.  Ofsted strives to maintain consistently high standards of inspection.  Data is set in context: but there can be no excuse for low standards.  Ofsted celebrates innovative and creative curricula that are effective in meeting pupils’ needs.
  • 14.  “It is terribly important that we know what is going on, that Parliament knows and that the public know what it is getting for those billions of pounds that are being spent on education and I think that is, in the end, the most important role that Ofsted plays, reporting fearlessly and frankly on the state of education.” HMCI, 2004
  • 15.  The Framework for School Inspection, Ofsted, 2009.  The Evaluation Schedule for Schools, Ofsted, 2009.  Mathematics: understanding the score, Ofsted, 2008  ‘Twelve outstanding schools. Excelling against the odds’ Ofsted, 2009  All obtainable from www.ofsted.gov.uk

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