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Global hr forum2008-marshall smith-financial support for higher education reform

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  • 1. FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR HIGHER EDUCATION REFORM Teaching and Learning: Quality, Transparency, Efficiency and Productivity Global HR Forum Session A-3 Seoul, Korea November 6, 2008 Marshall S. Smith Education Program Director The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  • 2. Overview § Introduction: Changing world of tertiary education: Accountability for teaching and learning critical. § Three disruptive interventions for teaching and learning § OpenCourseWare: Transparency and accountability. § Open Learning Initiative: Efficiency and effectiveness. § OECD assessment. Effectiveness and productivity. § Observations. 2
  • 3. Indicators of Teaching and Learning § Tertiary education critical to economic and social capital of a nation. § Huge growth in demand. § Investment in needs growing. § Changing economies create new goals and opportunities § 21st century skills. § Web–based teaching and learning opportunities and environments. § Typical measures of inputs (books, college admission scores) and outputs (research, graduation rates). § Few measures of added value of institution to student learning. § Investors inspire growing need for assurances of effectiveness of teaching and learning. 3
  • 4. OpenCourseWare (OCW) § OCW is open, free, on the web 24/7 § OCW is course materials, syllabi, lecture notes and guides, reading lists, assessments, simulations, video, etc. § MIT started in 2001: now 1,800 courses § OCW Consortium: now 200 members: 6,000 total courses § 10 languages: many translations 4
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  • 7. Universities working together to advance education and empower people OCWC Live Sites—January 2007 lllll lllll lllll lllll lllll lll lllll l lllll lllll lllll lllll lllll l • 75 live OCW sites • 6000 + published courses Dalian 2008 OCWC Conference 48 7
  • 8. Universities working together to advance education and empower people Monthly Visits: April 2007 Dalian 2008 OCWC Conference 122 8
  • 9. OCW: Quality, Transparency and Accountability § Professors value respect of peers and students. § An OCW course is open for all peers, students, parents, administrators around the world to review. § Powerful incentive to motivate high-quality work by faculty posting their work. § The transparency helps inspire other faculty to meet quality standards. 9
  • 10. Open Learning Initiative (OLI) § Carnegie Mellon University open (web-based, 24/7) full college courses. § Based on cognitive and computer science. Content exactly what corresponding lecture course has. § “Cognitive tutors” have: § very high-quality content § feedback loops to personalize instruction– individual tutors § courses under student control and motivating. § Experiments indicate as effective or more so – randomized design experiment shows more effective in one-half the time. 10
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  • 13. Open Learning Initiative Possible implications § Supports learners in regular and supplemental fashion. § May replace need for lecturers in many courses. § Challenges structure of instruction and role of professors. § Challenges conventional thinking about semesters. § Probably more effective than many teachers. § Powerful implications for efficiency. § Open creates diverse opportunities for learning. 13
  • 14. OECD Learning Assessment § At meeting in 2007 OECD Ministers of Education interested in assessing impact of tertiary institutions on student learning. § Motivated by OECD Programme in Student Assessment: 21st century skills assessment for 15-year-olds. Powerful policy implications. § Planning group recommended a trial tertiary assessment. § Main purpose being formative, used for improvement: Ministers approved. 14
  • 15. OECD Institutional Assessment § Trial Assessment: 3-4 countries, 3-4 institutions per country. § Two possible assessments: 1. Based on Collegiate Learning Assessment in U.S. to assess general problem-solving, analysis, creative writing skills to sample of overall graduating class. 2. Assess widely used and relatively common content discipline area: sample of discipline area graduates. 15
  • 16. OECD Learning Assessment § If works, by 2013 available to all OECD and possibly other countries. § Institutional scores. § Perhaps pre-assessment in future to capture value-added by the institution. § Measure to be interpreted with other quality and effectiveness institutional measures. § Focus on effectiveness and productivity. 16
  • 17. Observations § Each approach: Open CourseWare, open courses, institutional assessment—affects different aspects of institution’s quality and effectiveness. § Each challenges conventional practice. § Each is entirely plausible. The implementation challenge, however, is adaptive and requires § expertise and organizational skills § great political will § The payoff is potentially substantial. 17