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Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
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Early career stem faculty; toward a more inclusive stem infrastructure-alan henkin, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea

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Advanced, innovation and technology-driven economies have made substantial investments in infrastructure in order to establish and maintain preeminence in STEM fields. National demographics, …

Advanced, innovation and technology-driven economies have made substantial investments in infrastructure in order to establish and maintain preeminence in STEM fields. National demographics, occupational migration patterns, and impending retirements among professional senior STEM faculty in higher education will impact the extent to which these investments will be sufficient to maintain leadership in STEM fields. A more inclusive, diverse corpus of young scholars will be responsible for the preparation of STEM knowledge workers into the 21st century. In this paper, I examine the compelling demographics that support the merit of the arguments for a more inclusive STEM faculty workforce in higher education. The realities of academic careers in the hard disciplines and challenges experienced by early-career faculty are considered. I review policies and programs of Korea and the United States that are targeted to the support of underrepresented faculty. Recent inquiry on STEM organizational work environments, early-career faculty advancement and career success, faculty commitment, and actionable findings associated with reform of academic work environments are discussed . Finally, I suggest the utility of a faculty community of practice available on-line.

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  • 1. Toward a More Inclusive STEM Infrastructure
  • 2. • Scientific innovation has produced an estimated 50% of economic growth in the last 50 years, while only an approximately 5% of the U.S. workforce is employed in STEM fields • Both U.S. and S. Korea depend on continuous availability of STEMp y “Knowledge Workers” • Adequacy of supply and the quality of the STEM knowledgeAdequacy of supply and the quality of the STEM knowledge workers key to the maintenance of quality of life • Global economic and technological vulnerabilities increase where• Global economic and technological vulnerabilities increase where STEM workforces and infrastructures are diminished Source: National Academy of Science (NAS), 2006
  • 3. • Difficult to regain economic benefits of preeminent status in innovation and technology-driven economies once momentum is lost. • Participation of underrepresented populations in some economy-p p p p y critical fields (Engineering, Computer Science) essential to fuel the next-generation engines of growthg g g • Absent increased investment in STEM workforce preparation, including more underrepresented populations, US and otherc ud g o e u de ep ese ed popu a o s, US a d o e advanced nations are likely to continue to lose quality jobs, and experience weaker domestic market demand for goods andp g services Source: NSF, 2004; Babco, 2004; NAS, 2006
  • 4. Demographic Realities Impacting STEM • Declining birth ratesDeclining birth rates • Impending retirements among senior professionals (mostly-men) in STEM fieldsSTEM fields • Gender-gap increases with levels of education in STEM fields I d d d STEM f h i• Increased dependency on STEM experts from other countries Source: KISTEP, 2006; Nelson, 2005; OECD, 2006
  • 5. • World Population Growth Rate: 1.133% (2009)W p G 33% ( 009) • Korea, South: 0.266% (2010, Est.) • Japan 0 191% (2010 Est )• Japan: -0.191% (2010, Est.) • Singapore: 0.998% (2010, Est.) • U.S.: 0.977% (2010, Est.) • Implications: • a) Shrinking labor force with problems filling key jobs, • b) Even lower growth rates, if not for in-migration to meet some expertise-related and labor requirements.requirements. Source: CIA /WFB, 2009; WIST,2010
  • 6. S NEC 2010Source: NEC, 2010
  • 7. Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics 2009 Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers in theStatistics, 2009, Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States: 2006
  • 8. Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2009, Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States: 2006
  • 9. • Both the U S and S Korea continue to invest in national Policy• Both the U.S. and S. Korea continue to invest in national Policy- Driven Programs targeted to building a more diverse STEM human capital base (ISWIST;WIST-FIT; ADVANCE: MARC U*human capital base (ISWIST;WIST-FIT; ADVANCE: MARC U , MBRS) • Both U.S. and S. Korea show notable success in increasing ti i ti f d t d l ti i STEMparticipation of underrepresented populations in some STEM fields (Biological Sciences/ Undergraduate Level STEM education)education)
  • 10. • Fact: Significant increments in participation in STEM fields amongFact: Significant increments in participation in STEM fields among underrepresented populations where institutional environments, policies and practices significantly impact personal choices inp p g y p p gender-specific way…No lack of interest among women in STEM • Highly qualified persons from underrepresented groups, however,Highly qualified persons from underrepresented groups, however, continue to choose non-STEM employment Sources: ITAA, 2005; Dee, et al, 2010; Kezar & Lester, 2009; Pieroneck, 2005
  • 11. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, & 2000, Census of the population (Washington, DC).
  • 12. 52.9 50 60 33.1 29.3 29.2 27.5 22.4 20 9 19 4 30 40 20.9 19.4 14.9 13.1 10.4 10.3 7.7 6.710 20 0 Source: U S Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics 2009 WomenSource: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009, Women in the labor force: A databook (Report 1018) (Washington, DC).
  • 13. 60.0 39.7 47.9 40.0 50.0 30.2 28.2 35.3 34.3 29.6 30.0 1966 1976 1986 12.0 19.5 11.6 11.3 16.6 20.8 16.6 12 21.0 20.6 15.1 12.3 13 21.3 20.2 16.6 20.0 1996 2006 3.0 6.1 6.1 0 0.3 1.9 9.0 11.3 9.4 1.9 4.0 6.7 9.3 0 0 10.0 Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources 0.0 Biomedical and agricultural sciences Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences Chemistry Mathmetics Computer science Engineering Physics Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2008, Science and engineering degrees: 1966–2006
  • 14. Source: NSF/NIH/USED/NEH/USDA/NASA, 2006 Survey of Earned Doctorates/ / / / / , y
  • 15. Rank Country/economy Number of doctorate recipients 1 China a 4 7741 China a 4,774 2 India 1,742 3 Korea 1,648 4 Taiwan 718 5 Canada 561 Top 5 countries/economies of origin 9,443 Total non-U.S. citizens (158 countries/economies) b 15,916 I l d H Ka Includes Hong Kong. b Excludes cases with unknown country/economy of origin SOURCE: NSF/NIH/USED/NEH/USDA/NASA, 2006 Survey of Earned Doctorates.
  • 16. Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2009, Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States: 2006
  • 17. 39.2 40.3 45 Science 45 Engineering 36.9 36.7 37.6 39.2 28.2 28.5 29.9 32.0 33.2 30 35 40 30 35 40 20 25 20 25 7.1 7.5 7.4 8.2 9.9 5 10 15 13.2 12.8 13.6 13.7 14.0 11.5 10.7 10.6 10.3 10.3 2 6 2 9 3.2 3.4 3.65 10 15 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Master's Doctoral Full-time 2.6 2.9 3.2 0 5 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Faculty Source: 2009 Report on Women in Science and Technology, National Institute for Supporting Women in Science and Technology (2010)Science and Technology (2010) 자료: 2009 여성과학기술인력 현황, 전국 여성과학기술인 지원센터 (2010)
  • 18. 80 90 Science 80 90 Engineering 60 70 80 60 70 80 41.2 44.3 43.7 46.8 46.5 34 2 35 930 40 50 30 40 50 30.2 34.3 33.4 34.2 35.9 10 20 30 13.3 13.0 12.6 13.7 14.1 7 0 7 6 8 9 9 1 10 20 30 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Masters Doctoral 5.4 7.0 7.6 8.9 9.1 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Masters Doctoral Source: 2009 Report on Women in Science and Technology, National Institute for Supporting Women in Science and Technology (2010)Science and Technology (2010) 자료: 2009 여성과학기술인력 현황, 전국 여성과학기술인 지원센터 (2010)
  • 19. 25 21.1 15 20 11.8 21.1 2007 5 10 11.8 4.8 5.2 2007 2008 0 5 S&E universitiy 3.9 3.0 S&E universitiy Public research institute Private research institute Source: 2009 Report on Women in Science and Technology, National Institute for Supporting Women in S i d T h l (2010)Science and Technology (2010) 자료: 2009 여성과학기술인력 현황, 전국 여성과학기술인 지원센터 (2010)
  • 20. Source: 2009 Report on Women in Science and Technology, National Institute for Supporting Women in S i d T h l (2010)Science and Technology (2010) 자료: 2009 여성과학기술인력 현황, 전국 여성과학기술인 지원센터 (2010)
  • 21. S N ti l S i F d ti Di i i f S i RSource: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2009, Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers: 2006
  • 22. • A more diverse faculty now in their early careers will prepare• A more diverse faculty, now in their early careers, will prepare the next-generation of STEM knowledge workers • Success and advancement of these early career STEM faculty d d k i i f l ddepend on work environments supportive of personal and professional aspirations and expectations
  • 23. 97 5 80 90 100 97.5 84.1 77.3 60 70 80 30 40 50 25.6 24.5 0 10 20 13.4 13.7 0 pre-/post- birth leave Maternity leave Parental leave for men Provision of feeding room/hours Flexible working hours/home working system Establishment of and support for in-home (nearby) day-care centers Subsidy for day- care center costs Source: 2009 Report on Women in Science and Technology, National Institute for Supporting Women in S i d T h l (2010) Legally stiplated policies Autonomous policies/ institutional discretion Science and Technology (2010) 자료: 2009 여성과학기술인력 현황, 전국 여성과학기술인 지원센터 (2010)
  • 24. What Makes a Difference? • Support for faculty work-life balance • Meaningful interactions between senior faculty and early-career faculty targeted to professional development and organizational socialization • Co-production through collaboration between early-career faculty and i f lsenior faculty • Level of discretion for structuring work A t t i t l STEM f lt f• Access to mentoring programs to prepare early-career STEM faculty for executive positions; signal that there are few structural constraints on initiatives for occupational mobilityp y
  • 25. What Makes a Difference? (Cont’d)( ) • Demonstrated organizational support for innovation that encourages risk- taking and creative functioning • Organizational Trust: Structures, rules and procedures that assure fair d h itreatment and strengthen commitment • Access to media/networks for collaboration and interaction
  • 26. Functions and Dimensions • Online Community for Interaction • Platform for Collaborative Work • Forum for the Organic Formation of Interest Groups • Community for Peer Mentoring
  • 27. Research/Professional Network: Find and Collaborate onResearch/Professional Network: Find and Collaborate on Scientific Projects S h f R h d P f i l O i i• Search for Research and Professional Opportunities • Formation of Inter-Institutional Teams to Develop Competitive Applications ( Contracts, Publications)
  • 28. Network Site AnalyticsNetwork Site Analytics How Effective is Your Network and How is it Being Used? • Site Analytics • Web-Based Site User Surveys • Qualitative Information in the Form of Video InterviewsQua a ve o a o e o o V deo e v ews
  • 29. Thank YouThank You 감사합니다감사합니다 Alan HenkinAlan Henkin University of Iowa ( alan-henkin@uiowa edu)( alan-henkin@uiowa.edu)

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