Global HR Forum 2010
Creative and Character Education
Seoul, South Korea, October 2010
David Parker, Director of Research,...
Creative Partnerships
aims to develop:
• the creativity and cultural learning of
young people, raising their
aspirations a...
Three tier programme
Enquiry School (1300 pa)
One year programme
£3,000 subsidy
+ 5 days Creative Agent time
Change School...
We achieve our aims by:
Fostering innovative, long-term
partnerships between schools
and creative practitioners and
organi...
Working intensively with
2,000schools in England each year
Provided
training for
55,000
teachers
Area Delivery
Partners
En...
Employment Prospects
60% of the jobs kids in
school today will do
have not yet been
invented
Creative Partnerships London ...
The Council for Industry in Higher Education’s
Fuse report said creative and digital skills –
which bridge the arts, human...
Creative Partnerships London South
Drawing with Light
Photographer: Robert Taylor
Using images
with text
Not job
seekers
b...
Creative Partnerships Slough
Montem School project
Photographer: Lesley Young
What are the skills
necessary to succeed in
...
Creative Partnerships London South
Drawing with Light
Photographer: Robert Taylor
‘Progressive’
Curriculum
1750
English
Ma...
Curriculum 1902
English
Maths
History
Geography
Science
Foreign Language
Drawing
Creative Partnerships Bristol
Chatterbox ...
Creative Partnerships Cornwall
Seeds of Trebah
Photography: Neale & Neale
Curriculum 2009
English
Maths
History
Geography
...
Creative Partnerships Bristol
Chatterbox project
Photography: Pickled Image
We asked our teams to
describe successful
crea...
Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford
Creative Thinking and Me
Photographer: Anne Worthington
Attainment
• NFER – Despi...
Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford
Creative Thinking and Me
Photographer: Anne Worthington
Attainment
• NFER – Track...
Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford
Creative Thinking and Me
Photographer: Anne Worthington
Attainment
•DCSF - While ...
Creative Partnerships Norfolk
Millfield Creative Week
Attainment
BMRB survey of 650
head teachers saw over
90% saying that...
Attainment
Ofsted 2010 - There is not a conflict between the
National Curriculum, national standards in core
subjects and ...
Pupil Attainment
Ofsted 2010 - Schools in challenging
circumstances ̶ those with a higher than average
proportion of pupil...
Attainment
• Ofsted 2007 Improvements in literacy, particularly writing,
and speaking were significant in the majority of ...
Creative Partnerships Norfolk
Millfield Creative Week
Teacher Skills
BMRB survey of 650
head teachers saw over
90% saying ...
Teacher Skills
Ofsted 2010 - Good professional development within
the school was a key factor in helping teachers to
encou...
Creative Partnerships BDR
Digital Photo Mosaic System
Photographer: Gavin Joynt
Pupil Behaviour
CLPE – Creative
Partnershi...
Pupil Behaviour
• Ofsted 2007 - Convincing evidence was provided in all CP
areas visited about the contribution to the Eve...
Creative Partnerships Norfolk
Millfield Creative Week
Pupil Motivation
BMRB survey of 650
head teachers saw over
90% sayin...
Pupil Creativity
• Ofsted 2007 Most Creative Partnerships programmes were
effective in developing in pupils some attribute...
Teach them to see
Working intensively with
2,000schools in England each year
Provided
training for
55,000
teachers
Area Delivery
Partners
En...
Creative Partnerships
aims to develop:
• the creativity and cultural learning of
young people, raising their
aspirations a...
We achieve our aims by:
Fostering innovative, long-term
partnerships between schools
and creative practitioners and
organi...
Three tier programme
Enquiry School (1300 pa)
One year programme
£3,000 subsidy
+ 5 days Creative Agent time
Change School...
Key Phases
Phase 1
Area Delivery Organisation established, Creative
Agents trained and schools selected
Phase 2
Creative A...
CCE Supports:
• Aims and vision of ADO
• Organisational structure
• Detailed programme induction
• Job descriptions
• Fina...
School Selection
A mixture of
- competitive recruitment and targeted selection
- with the advice of municipality / educati...
Creative Agent
A specially trained creative professional who has
skills in:
- Creative approaches to problem solving
- Man...
What will a Creative
Agent do in school?
- help to identify appropriate creative
practitioners
- advise on programme devel...
Creative Agents competencies
• Understands the Creative Partnerships programme
• Develops and manages effective relationsh...
Phase 2
School Self
Evaluation
Creative School
Development Framework
Creative Schools Development
Framework (CSDF)
• A diagnostic tool
• Helping schools on the journey to
becoming a creative ...
Creative Schools Development
Framework
Section 1 Leadership and ethos
Section 2 Curriculum development and delivery
Sectio...
Phase 3 - A strategy for embedding
creativity agreed and programme
developed.
- Creative Practitioners recruited
- Quality...
Phase 4 –
Programme
Delivered
Main tools
- School handbooks
- School Induction
- Training frameworks
- Project ideas
- Net...
Phase 5
Reflection
Considers the projects impact on the:
• Learning of young people
• Learning of teachers and school staf...
Creative Partnerships:
Curriculum Innovation
in Primary Schools
“They have already displayed thinking
and teamworking skil...
Reinterpret
the
Curriculum
Thistleyhaugh School Stoke
Give the
pupils the
responsibility
Kingsland Primary, Stoke
Put them in charge
Let the
children re-
design
education
Montpellier School, Plymouth
What makes a learning environment?
Our ideas at the beginning of today:
Libraries nice and quiet
Classrooms
Universities
C...
What makes a learning environment?
Our ideas now:
Fun and some equipment
We don’t even need equipment
Use each other
Educa...
All Creative Partnerships
programmes are
supported by extensive,
independent research
programmes.
In the UK, Creative
Partnerships is specifically
targeted at school
improvement.
The key elements of school
improvements are:
• Attainment (results)
• Teachers skills
• Behaviour
• Motivation
Photo title
Photography credit
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea
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Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea

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In this paper and presentation I want to show that the pressing challenges and concerns of 21st century education can be met through creative programmes of learning and that the unknown and largely unknowable requirements of a rapidly changing employment environment can best be met through the development of learners who are flexible, resilient, adaptable and innovative thinkers.

Since 2001 across England a growing number of schools have participated in a government funded programme called Creative Partnerships. I want to show how this programme not only meets the requirements of a more ‘traditional’ curriculum, but can also unlock the creative potential of learners in ways that better prepare them to embrace the new opportunities of fast changing global jobs markets.

The paper will describe the nature and scale of the Creative Partnerships programme and summarise a series of research studies which together give an aggregated account of impact. The evidence presents a powerful argument for concerted and co-ordinated approaches to education that unleash the full potential of learners through the use of creative people outside of the education sphere – among others, artists, dancers, writers, actors, filmmakers, architects and musicians.

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Transcript of "Creative and character education david parker, global hr forum 2010.pdf, seoul, korea"

  1. 1. Global HR Forum 2010 Creative and Character Education Seoul, South Korea, October 2010 David Parker, Director of Research, Creativity, Culture and Education (CCE)
  2. 2. Creative Partnerships aims to develop: • the creativity and cultural learning of young people, raising their aspirations and achievements • the skills of teachers and their ability to work with Creative Practitioners • schools’ approaches to culture, creativity and partnership working • the skills, capacity and sustainability of the creative industries, and other partners who wish to work with schools
  3. 3. Three tier programme Enquiry School (1300 pa) One year programme £3,000 subsidy + 5 days Creative Agent time Change School (850 pa) Three year programme £15,000 subsidy per year + 20 days Creative Agent time School of Creativity (60) Similar terms to Change Schools Responsibility for developing, influencing and leading practice
  4. 4. We achieve our aims by: Fostering innovative, long-term partnerships between schools and creative practitioners and organisations. These partnerships inspire young people and adults to challenge how they work and experiment with new ideas
  5. 5. Working intensively with 2,000schools in England each year Provided training for 55,000 teachers Area Delivery Partners Engaging 940,000young people each year Employing 8,000creative individuals or cultural organisations
  6. 6. Employment Prospects 60% of the jobs kids in school today will do have not yet been invented Creative Partnerships London East Raw Skills Dance project Photographer: Dee Conway
  7. 7. The Council for Industry in Higher Education’s Fuse report said creative and digital skills – which bridge the arts, humanities and science – were underappreciated. The report said if the UK could develop a workforce that is highly skilled in creative, digital and IT industries, it would be well-placed to win a substantial part of a global IT market set to be worth £1.9 trillion by 2014, as well as entertainment and media markets worth £1 trillion. (September 2010) http://www.cihe.co.uk/cihe-task-force-urges-far-reaching-changes-to- ensure-uk-is-a-leader-in-the-creative-digital-and-information- technology-industries/
  8. 8. Creative Partnerships London South Drawing with Light Photographer: Robert Taylor Using images with text Not job seekers but job creators
  9. 9. Creative Partnerships Slough Montem School project Photographer: Lesley Young What are the skills necessary to succeed in 21st Century ? - Thinking imaginatively/ lots of ideas - Taking confident decisions - Taking and managing risks - Asking challenging questions - Transferring knowledge/skills into new settings - Emotionally literate/ working effectively in teams - Spotting surprises - Persistence/resilience - Reflecting critically
  10. 10. Creative Partnerships London South Drawing with Light Photographer: Robert Taylor ‘Progressive’ Curriculum 1750 English Maths History Geography Science Latin and Greek Drawing + Fortification
  11. 11. Curriculum 1902 English Maths History Geography Science Foreign Language Drawing Creative Partnerships Bristol Chatterbox project Photography: Pickled Image
  12. 12. Creative Partnerships Cornwall Seeds of Trebah Photography: Neale & Neale Curriculum 2009 English Maths History Geography Science Foreign Language Art and Design Music ICT
  13. 13. Creative Partnerships Bristol Chatterbox project Photography: Pickled Image We asked our teams to describe successful creative schools and they said that they were: Imaginative Confident decision makers Good at taking and managing risk Full of questions Bursting with ideas Emotionally intelligent Persistent and Resilient Critical Reflectors
  14. 14. Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford Creative Thinking and Me Photographer: Anne Worthington Attainment • NFER – Despite coming from economically and socially challenged communities, young people who have participated in Creative Partnerships activities out-perform the national average at Key Stages 3 and 4.
  15. 15. Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford Creative Thinking and Me Photographer: Anne Worthington Attainment • NFER – Tracking 13,000 young people over several years shows that Creative Partnerships programmes are worth 2.5 grades at 16 years of age.
  16. 16. Creative Partnerships Manchester Salford Creative Thinking and Me Photographer: Anne Worthington Attainment •DCSF - While the average increase in the percentage of young people in England achieving 5 GCSE’s A-C has been 13.2%, the average increase in CP schools has been 16.6%. • Moreover, the improvement is greatest among those schools who stay in the programme – and increase of 20.5% among those who have been in the longest.
  17. 17. Creative Partnerships Norfolk Millfield Creative Week Attainment BMRB survey of 650 head teachers saw over 90% saying that CP: •Improved pupils academic achievement
  18. 18. Attainment Ofsted 2010 - There is not a conflict between the National Curriculum, national standards in core subjects and creative approaches to learning. In the schools which were visited for this survey, careful planning had ensured that the prescribed curriculum content for each subject was covered within a broad and flexible framework and key skills were developed. These examples were accompanied by better than average achievement and standards or a marked upward trend.”
  19. 19. Pupil Attainment Ofsted 2010 - Schools in challenging circumstances ̶ those with a higher than average proportion of pupils eligible for free schools meals, low attainment on entry and high rates of pupil mobility ̶ showed the greatest improvements in pupils’ ability to draw discerningly on a range of data and work collaboratively to solve problems; their reading and writing; their speaking and listening; and their personal development.”
  20. 20. Attainment • Ofsted 2007 Improvements in literacy, particularly writing, and speaking were significant in the majority of schools visited. • Ofsted 2010 That Creative Partnerships had demonstrated how even the most reluctant pupils could be engaged and excited.
  21. 21. Creative Partnerships Norfolk Millfield Creative Week Teacher Skills BMRB survey of 650 head teachers saw over 90% saying that CP: •Improved teaching skills and teachers creativity
  22. 22. Teacher Skills Ofsted 2010 - Good professional development within the school was a key factor in helping teachers to encourage and assess creative approaches to learning and improve their subject knowledge. Externally produced resources and short training courses had limited impact without local training and continuing in-school support.”
  23. 23. Creative Partnerships BDR Digital Photo Mosaic System Photographer: Gavin Joynt Pupil Behaviour CLPE – Creative Partnerships programmes engage parents in their children’s education NFER – Creative Partnerships programmes are associated with significant reductions in truancy rates
  24. 24. Pupil Behaviour • Ofsted 2007 - Convincing evidence was provided in all CP areas visited about the contribution to the Every Child Matters outcomes. The vast majority of pupils directly involved enjoyed their education in and through CP: good behaviour, co-operation, enthusiasm and pride were common outcomes.
  25. 25. Creative Partnerships Norfolk Millfield Creative Week Pupil Motivation BMRB survey of 650 head teachers saw over 90% saying that CP: • Improved pupils motivation, confidence and communication skills
  26. 26. Pupil Creativity • Ofsted 2007 Most Creative Partnerships programmes were effective in developing in pupils some attributes of creative people: an ability to improvise, take risks, show resilience, and collaborate with others.
  27. 27. Teach them to see
  28. 28. Working intensively with 2,000schools in England each year Provided training for 55,000 teachers Area Delivery Partners Engaging 940,000young people each year Employing 8,000creative individuals or cultural organisations
  29. 29. Creative Partnerships aims to develop: • the creativity and cultural learning of young people, raising their aspirations and achievements • the skills of teachers and their ability to work with Creative Practitioners • schools’ approaches to culture, creativity and partnership working • the skills, capacity and sustainability of the creative industries, and other partners who wish to work with schools
  30. 30. We achieve our aims by: Fostering innovative, long-term partnerships between schools and creative practitioners and organisations. These partnerships inspire young people and adults to challenge how they work and experiment with new ideas
  31. 31. Three tier programme Enquiry School (1300 pa) One year programme £3,000 subsidy + 5 days Creative Agent time Change School (850 pa) Three year programme £15,000 subsidy per year + 20 days Creative Agent time School of Creativity (60) Similar terms to Change Schools Responsibility for developing, influencing and leading practice
  32. 32. Key Phases Phase 1 Area Delivery Organisation established, Creative Agents trained and schools selected Phase 2 Creative Agent matched to school and school evaluated using the Creative Schools Development Framework Phase 3 A strategy for embedding creative learning in the schools curriculum is agreed and programme developed Phase 4 Programme delivered Phase 5 Reflection
  33. 33. CCE Supports: • Aims and vision of ADO • Organisational structure • Detailed programme induction • Job descriptions • Financial model • School recruitment • School Networking • Mentoring • Management development • Monitoring and quality assurance • Trouble shooting Area Delivery Organisation Third sector flexible organisation able to manage the programme whose staffing depends on the number of schools
  34. 34. School Selection A mixture of - competitive recruitment and targeted selection - with the advice of municipality / education authority Tools we have developed - application forms - briefing sessions for schools - selection criteria - selection process - feedback to unsuccessful and successful schools
  35. 35. Creative Agent A specially trained creative professional who has skills in: - Creative approaches to problem solving - Managing partnerships - Developing and delivering Creative Partnerships - Reflective Practice - Managing Change Tools we have developed - Induction and training modules for CA’s - CA competency framework - Job description
  36. 36. What will a Creative Agent do in school? - help to identify appropriate creative practitioners - advise on programme development - advise on project management - act as a ‘critical friend’ - challenge thinking and practice. Creative Partnerships Norfolk: Millfield Creative Week
  37. 37. Creative Agents competencies • Understands the Creative Partnerships programme • Develops and manages effective relationships with schools • Encourages and develops reflective practice • Sees the relationship between their own creative practice and the creativity of others • Develops the school as a supportive context for creative learning • Sees Children and Young People as co-participants at the core of everything creative partnerships does • Project planning • Recruits and manages Creative Practitioners
  38. 38. Phase 2 School Self Evaluation Creative School Development Framework
  39. 39. Creative Schools Development Framework (CSDF) • A diagnostic tool • Helping schools on the journey to becoming a creative school
  40. 40. Creative Schools Development Framework Section 1 Leadership and ethos Section 2 Curriculum development and delivery Section 3 Teaching and learning Section 4 Staff learning and development Section 5 Environment and resources Section 6 Programme plan
  41. 41. Phase 3 - A strategy for embedding creativity agreed and programme developed. - Creative Practitioners recruited - Quality of artistic input key to achieving programme goals
  42. 42. Phase 4 – Programme Delivered Main tools - School handbooks - School Induction - Training frameworks - Project ideas - Networking
  43. 43. Phase 5 Reflection Considers the projects impact on the: • Learning of young people • Learning of teachers and school staff • Learning of Creative Practitioners It is also an assessment of: • Input, process and quality • Distance travelled by the school
  44. 44. Creative Partnerships: Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools “They have already displayed thinking and teamworking skills which are far beyond those of their peers; there is no question that they have a headstart!” Teacher, Creative Partnerships – Kent
  45. 45. Reinterpret the Curriculum Thistleyhaugh School Stoke
  46. 46. Give the pupils the responsibility Kingsland Primary, Stoke
  47. 47. Put them in charge
  48. 48. Let the children re- design education Montpellier School, Plymouth
  49. 49. What makes a learning environment? Our ideas at the beginning of today: Libraries nice and quiet Classrooms Universities Colleges Secondary schools People who are really smart – who you look up to Teacher Books lessons boring Internet, calculators, pens, and pencils, exercise books White board
  50. 50. What makes a learning environment? Our ideas now: Fun and some equipment We don’t even need equipment Use each other Educational stuff everywhere– just read a book Outside Don’t need walls Concentration – useful to have some one to tell you things Games help you learn Can find things out yourself – internet People have to learn at work all the time Just because you already know things and have a job doesn’t mean you know anything useful – you will have to go on learning
  51. 51. All Creative Partnerships programmes are supported by extensive, independent research programmes.
  52. 52. In the UK, Creative Partnerships is specifically targeted at school improvement.
  53. 53. The key elements of school improvements are: • Attainment (results) • Teachers skills • Behaviour • Motivation
  54. 54. Photo title Photography credit

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