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TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
TheCustomerArchetype
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TheCustomerArchetype

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The Customer Archetype: …

The Customer Archetype:
Benchmarking Key Dimensions of
Customer Need, Want and Aspiration

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  • 1. The Customer Archetype: Benchmarking Key Dimensions of Customer Need, Want and Aspiration Michael Eckersley, MFA, PhD Customer Needs Discovery & Innovation Congress, Chicago, 13 June, 2007Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 2. schedule TIME SUBJECT / ACTIVITY 8:00 - 8:15 Coffee & introductions • Human archetypes • The brand gap 1 8:15 -9:45 • Perceptual frameworks • Identities and genuineness WHAT & WHY • Human universals • Bottom-up insights • Research focus to enable business strategy • Spend a day-in-the-life of your customer •Learnings from field observation, interaction •Data collection: documenting human experience 10:00 - 11:45 •Data organization and analysis 2 WHEN, WHERE, •Constructing and representing the persona or archetype •Spotting relationships and patterns HOW •Diagramming and data modeling •Examples and discussion •Representing product/service innovation insights •Summary principles, processes, methods, and take-away Slides & Articles: humancentered.net/blog/hciblog.htmlManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 3. introductions about me Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 4. introductions about us Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 5. introductions OUR WORK TOUCHES AFFECTS research & discovery products desirability & utility design scenarios & services & systems behaviors simulations concept innovation brands brand experience environments market value Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 6. introductions about you Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 7. “The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him, and sells itself.” —Peter DruckerManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 8. Archetypes are human models, synthesized from multiple customer personas into a single valid composite, evidence-based character that is representative of a type or category of humans. Borrowed and adapted from the work of Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell, archetypes are sophisticated artifacts crafted from qualitative contextual research data (i.e., human code) and used by design teams to help guide the innovation process.Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 9. Though the customer archetype is often purposed to inform the design of new customer-focused products, services, or environments), the archetype is–of itself–a valuable artifact to business. It is an important cultural probe.Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 10. In their day-to-day focus on markets and financials, on strategic interests and management functions, decision-makers routinely lose touch with customer’s critical needs, wants, values, and dreams. Thru a conscious process of bringing "The Customer" back to life from a state of abstraction or limiting stereotype, business leaders can rediscover the purpose of business: to create delighted and well-served customers.Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 11. Archetypal scenarios Archetypal actors "The archetypal story unearths a universally human experience, then wraps itself inside a unique, culture- specific expression. A stereotypical story reverses this pattern: It suffers a poverty of both content and form. Itconfines itself to a narrow, culture-specific experience and dresses in stale, nonspecific generalities". Stereotypical stories stay at home, archetypal stories travel. -Robert McKee
  • 12. How did Walt know what to build?
  • 13. < Why do so many brands fail to connect? >Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 14. Brand Failure Brands begin and end with people. Companies suffer for lack of deep knowledge of the end customer—how she thinks, perceives, and acts within a natural cultural context. Confusion, faulty assumptions, and bad decisions are the natural consequence of that information deficit. “Know your customer” is still the first principle of business, but it is often the first casualty of growth and success.Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 15. Brand Conversation “Strong brands are all about conversation, and good conversation is two-way, lively, and mutually rewarding. It is one of our most intrinsically human needs, and it grows out of a deep desire for personal identity and interpersonal dialogue. Conversation is a good metaphor for the ideal function of a brand.”Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 16. Genuine interest is hard to fake “More than a few brands are conversationally challenged. Whether the problem is technical (you’ve started the conversation at the wrong place, they can’t hear you, or they’re simply the wrong audience), stylistic (your technique is inapt or distracting), content related (your message is irrelevant or not compelling), or some combination of these, it is best to remember that the currency of brand conversation—like good interpersonal conversation—is genuine interest in what the other has to say.”Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 17. Layers of Identity Core Identity Organizational Identity Corporate Identity Brand Identity(ies)Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 18. What constitutes data? “It is essential to the success of interaction design that designers find a way to understand the perceptions, circumstances, habits, needs, and desires of the ultimate users.” –Jane Fulton Suri, 2005© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 19. qualitative, naturalistic data “Anecdotes carefully collected and reported are theimportant data of cultural understanding. Anecdotes can reveal truths below the surface that broader market statistics conceal” – Clarence Page
  • 20. Growth Strategies new offerings evolutionary revolutionary Diversify Create extend brand create markets share of wallet disrupt markets leverage users existing users new users Manage Expand raise price win share raise usage expand footprint win share incremental existing offerings evolutionary Source: IDEOManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 21. Process Methodology what what is if? Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 22. what is Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 23. what if?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 24. abstract analysis synthesis understand create research realization realize Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 25. Patrick Whitney on the value ofabstracting design problems www.vimeo.com/5750600
  • 26. The St. John’s Senior Study ("Opal") 1. Create "noisy" market differentiation in the primary care category. 2. Innovate the very nature of the primary care clinic experience what is© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 27. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 28. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 29. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 30. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 31. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 32. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 33. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 34. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 35. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 36. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 37. The St. John’s Senior Study ("Opal") 1. Create "noisy" market differentiation in the primary care category. 2. Innovate the very nature of the primary care clinic experience what if?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 38. Sifting The Random Touchpoints © HumanCentered 2005, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 39. Finding Categories & Themes © HumanCentered 2005, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 40. Data Points, Touchpoints, Moments of Truth . . .Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 41. Senior Touch Points Individual Appointment timing (in general) Avocations, past careers, lost careers Being financially sensitive (fixed income or not) Cassette tape recorders Doctor or staff “going too quickly” Doctors who are willing to say “I don’t know” Finding desirable movies Finding new meanings in life, since retirement Forgetting “till later” Getting lost Keeping busy vs. Getting bored List-making for the doctor appointment Paperwork and forms Preparing for the doctor visit Pride Private transportation options Public bathroom privacy (going slow) Puzzles and other brain teasers Recliners or very comfortable furniture for longer waits Reminders or forgetting altogether Smith-Glynn bills, billing problems, difficulty reading bills Waiting or leaving (with delays) What was it I wanted to ask the doc?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 42. Senior Touch Points Interpersonal “I’m here a lot, don’t treat me like a new patient” Caring for peers and those older than oneself Club house and socializing Doctor as “savior” vs. Doctor as peer vs. Doctor as consultant Doctors who listen, take the necessary time, answer questions E-mailing others Extended family relations Favorite clinic staff Grandchild care or sitting Human-to-human contact I see lots of older people here, but i don’t know any of them Is the doc being straight with me? Listening to “our songs” Loneliness vs. Companionship Nobody here really knows me Open posture (doctor and staff) Peer group Pets (and aging) Seeing and/or visiting with children at Smith-Glynn Staff and physicians relations Weekly phone calls with family and friends What can my companion do at Smith-Glynn?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 43. Senior Touch Points Environmental Bathrooms (non-unisex, oversized) Café, restaurant, cafeteria Can’t easily see if my ride has arrived from inside Smith-Glynn Easy in-out regular parking spots Floor texture/material transitions Getting lost in Smith-Glynn Good campus maps and individual facility maps Handicapped parking spots National Avenue “scares me” No cozy space here to sit Not enough seating outside front door Outdoors and wildlife Plants, flowers, atriums, planters looks nice Post-office Safe sidewalks to Smith-Glynn Smith-Glynn as second home Smith-Glynn entry and exit The city bus isn’t an option for me The city bus route map is confusing Smith-Glynn bus stop feels dangerous Smith-Glynn doesn’t even appear on city bus map Unattractive institutional furniture Wheelchairs and walkers at curbside Where do I put my stuff (coat, materials)?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 44. Senior Touch Points Health Ambient room temperature Anxiety regarding health Fasting before appointment Fresh fruit Internet research Juices to drink Listening to music or TV in the background to relax Medication side effects Not ever feeling 100% Soy milk Need three meals a day Toast YogurtManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 45. “Opal” ProfileManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 46. What Matters to “Opal”?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 47. Senior Archetype Continuum frail robustManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 48. Persistent Archetypal CharactersManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 49. Excerpt Scenario of Use: Archetype Validation Hello. I’m Opal. I was born in 1927 on a small farm outside Joplin in Southwest Missouri. I grew up with two older brothers and a younger sister, Margaret, who still lives in Joplin, and was widowed five years ago. We visit each other two or three times a year (usually on the holidays), and talk on the phone at least once a month. I was a child during the depression, and remember lots of folks being desperately poor. We, at least, had some livestock, a big garden and some fruit trees, so we had it pretty good, compared others at the time. I graduated high school, though my brothers didn’t. The war came along and changed lots of lives, including ours. I met Carl, a boy from town, when he was on leave before being shipped off to England. We hit it off just like that, and we wrote to each other all through the War. That’s how we got to know each other. We married in March of 1946 when he was decommissioned. He came back to Missouri to work in a local Hard Goods and Feed Supply store. Times were tight and we didn’t have much, we were happy. He had a job, we had an apartment above the store (which we rented from Carl’s boss) and our first two kids came along in no time at all. Over the years we moved around some. We lived in Kansas City for almost ten years; Carl got a lineman’s job with the phone company there. Then in 1958 we moved to Springfield with the phone company. Springfield is home. After the kids were in school I took a clerical job with Springfield City. I was always handy with numbers in school, so accounting and office work came pretty naturally to me. I enjoyed working and Carl and I always had a nice assortment of friends. Carl died in 1993 from cancer. March 28, 1991 was our 50th anniversary. He wasn’t here, and it was a tough time for me.Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 50. Excerpt Scenario of Use: Archetype Validation Today I live in a nice 2-bedroom apartment here in town. Elaine, my youngest daughter, lives in Nixa, just out of town a bit. My children and grandchildren are a blessing. I have friends too, and I don’t lack for things to do to fill my days. I usually plan my day around a visit to Elaine’s, some TV and reading, a movie or a social activity at my church or the local St. John’s Senior Center. Last year a group of seven of us took a cruise in the Caribbean. I’m in pretty good health. I’m on blood pressure medication and several other medications, I’ve had one major surgery (but I was home after just a day and half stay). But otherwise, I’m lucky. More than one of my school friends from the graduating class has passed away, I can tell you. I have a good doctor and do regular check-ups. I don’t want any bad surprises. I don’t “enjoy” going to the doctor — who does? But since St. John’s fixed up the old Smith-Glynn clinic, the one on National, they’ve made the experience pretty enjoyable. For one thing it’s so much easier to get in and out of. Secondly, they’ve pulled out all the stops to make it very pretty (with lots of trees, flowers and footpaths), and very friendly to those of us that don’t get around as quickly as the young people. The staff there have always been nice to me, but in terms of being there it’s just very pleasant. There’s lots of light inside (it used to feel so dark, and even though I had been there for years, I’d still get lost), lots of plants and the sound of water. It doesn’t feel like a clinic, but sort of reminds me of a nice hotel lobby or atrium. My friend Loretta and I go to Smith-Glynn about once a week to walk. They have a nice outdoor and indoor walking path. Afterwards, we eat in the little café inside (the food there is better than most any other café in town, plus it’s just a nice place to sit down for a breather). We’ve gotten to know some other regulars there as well. Good food and company attracts people. They have a St. John’s “Seniors” outpost there. Jenny, Claude or Sy areManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 51. Excerpt Scenario of Use: Archetype Validation St. John’s always seems to be looking for ways to make things better, simpler and easier for us Seniors. That says a lot to me. It used to be so difficult getting in and out of that clinic, what with traffic on National. Now there’s a big turn out and sweeping drive that allows cars to drive right into parking areas, either front or back. Even City buses can now drive up near the building. It’s also easier to get out. I can either use the wide merge lane to go south, or follow the drive to the nearest northbound stoplight. Pretty simple now even for a single driver like me. For people with real disabilities, there’s a nice big drive-up and attendants to help them in and out of cars and assist with wheelchairs, and so forth. Very first class! Another nice thing that St. John’s has done is simplify their bills and other mailings, to make them easier to understand and use. Sounds funny, I know, but I used to really struggle trying to decipher the stuff they’d send me — and I sort of pride myself on being smart with office and accounting matters. Now I don’t dread so much getting their mail (I just wish the government did as well with Medicare information). They’ve also assembled a nice set of maps that the staff will draw directions on for me, when I need to go back and forth to the St. John’s campus. Even the old folks’ parking spots are clearly indicated. All in all, I live a pretty full life; it’s right for me. I don’t sleep as well as I used to, usually have to get up and go to the bathroom. But I have family and my friends nearby — and I have a doctor and health plan that makes every effort to keep me well. I can’t do much better than that. - OpalManagement Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 52. what if?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 53. what if?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 54. what if?Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 55. Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved
  • 56. "Test everything against the filters" © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 57. © HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved© HumanCentered 2004, All Rights Reserved
  • 58. The Customer Archetype: Benchmarking Key Dimensions of Customer Need, Want and Aspiration Michael Eckersley, MFA, PhD Customer Needs Discovery & Innovation Congress, Chicago, 13 June, 2007Management Roundtable, Inc. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved

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