Interaction Design 6/16: Interfaces: Simple and Complex
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Interaction Design 6/16: Interfaces: Simple and Complex, by Michael Eckersley, PhD

Interaction Design 6/16: Interfaces: Simple and Complex, by Michael Eckersley, PhD

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    Interaction Design 6/16: Interfaces: Simple and Complex Interaction Design 6/16: Interfaces: Simple and Complex Presentation Transcript

    • Interaction Design INTERACTION DESIGN: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES ADS 765, ADS 560, INDD 578 (3 credits) Fall 2013 Tuesday 6:00–9:00p, CDR West Lawrence Campus, BEST245, Edwards Campus. Fall 2008 6. System Interfaces: Simple and Complex 06Sept 24, 2013 Law Grads: Devinee Fitzgerald, Cyrus Chengyang, Jessica Shomaker, Heba Abdulrahman Edw Grads: Alice Hahn, Peter Henne, Ashley Mahoney, Todd Register, Adam Roush, Laura Weible Law UGrads: Amber Hanschu, Lauren Lawton, Tyler Peuser, Samantha Thomas, Jessica Tungesvik
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Week Date LECTURE & DISCUSSION EXERCISE Wk 6 Oct 2 Complex System Interfaces Chapter 6: “Interfaces” pp 157-221 Chapter 4: “Computational Strategies of Representation” pp. 105-136 none Wk7 Oct 9 Data Gathering Chapter 7: “Data Gathering” Chapter 5: “Building Procedural Complexity” P.137 Screen video: http:// www.wired.com/ autopia/2012/08/ford- sync-pollen/ Start conversations with potential users: See Page 24 below COURSE SCHEDULE TONITE NEXT user types: elders, family, teen, ill person
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Capturing the “grapefruit” experience Law Grads: Devinee Fitzgerald, Cyrus Chengyang, Jessica Shomaker, Heba Abdulrahman Edw Grads: Alice Hahn, Peter Henne, Ashley Scheuerman, Todd Register, Adam Roush, Laura Weible Law UGrads: Amber Hanschu, Lauren Lawton, Tyler Peuser, Samantha Thomas, Jessica Tungesvik
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Grapefruit UX 13Grapefruit UX 13Grapefruit UX 13 range scores grades 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 1 A 17 16 1 B 15 1,1,1 B 14 13 1 B 12 1,1 C 11 1,1,1 C 10 1 C 9 1 C 8 1,1 C 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 tot 15 X12.3 –
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design ➋ ➌ ➍➊ ➎ muchlittle ➋ ➎ ➎ ➍ ➋ UX Score: 18/25
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design ➋ ➌ ➍➊ ➎ muchlittle ➋ ➎ ➎ ➍ ➋ UX Score: 18/25 ➋ ➌ ➊ ➊ ➊
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Strategies and learnings in effective experience communication: 1.Imagination helps (encouraged), in service to the objective 2.The more sensory modes engaged the better: maximize the information content. maximize the number of experiential modes 3.“Live action” video footage has its advantages over still media or text. Video documentation feels more immediate, vivid for the viewer. 4.Good video and still photographic quality and editing have advantages over low-fi video lo-fi video & photos 5.Bigger images have advantage over small, inset images. 6.Higher ratio of visuals-to-narrative or text seems more engaging: snippets of reaction easier to take in than long prose 7.Showing facial expressions helps convey emotion behind the experience, elicits empathy, engagement 8.Sensory and emotional aspects of experience are hard to capture and communicate in prose. Takes considerable writing skill to hook the reader and keep her engaged. Simulating or recreating the experience produces better results over reportage. Learning what works:
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design 9. Finding an anecdote or story (beginning, middle, end), in the experience is more satisfying than reporting a sequence of events. 10. Showing the experience vicariously thru the eyes of a real character, rather than an anonymous author, grounds the experience, helps the viewer/ reader empathize. 11. Meanings and associations can be drawn out of the experiences, but simple documentation does not necessarily uncover them. 12. Original photography, though maybe not as high quality, tends to feel more valid than stock photography 13. Communicating the experience of others--thru their eyes, helps one be more objective, less judgmental in reporting. First-person experience is important to understand and empathize, but our opinions can get in the way, and aren’t necessarily germane to the objective. In other words, “the experience” isn’t necessarily “your experience”. Passion and dispassion, each at the right time, can make all the difference for a professional. 14. Effective experience documentation and communication doesn’t have much to do with common approaches to writing and reporting we learn in school
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Who’s the audience for the current ux snapshot? What’s the purpose? Why do they need to see it themselves? What then?
    • OUR USERS DAN ("The Contractor") STEVEN ("The Technical Director") BARBARA ("The Social Worker") SCOTT ("The Teacher") JULIDA ("The Accountant") KIM ("The Dietician") JOHN ("The Silkscreen Artist") PHILIP ("The Printbroker") AMY ("The Ad Sales Rep") GREGORY, ("The Cabinet Salesman") • Non-random, generally reflective • Small sample (n=10) • Rich, fine-grained qualitative data 11
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Design the right thing. We use these ux snapshots to gauge how to:
    • Design the right thing. political, strategic © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design
    • Design the thing right. © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design
    • Design the thing right. tactical, operational © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design
    • 16 When your car intervenes to keep you safe: Automative analytics and biometrics
    • 17 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Yd9Ij0INX0&list=PLVOm- I32QB_yL5JztNxPPoahxJZQXV_uN&index=2 Embedded Linux Conference 2013 KEYNOTE: Google's Self Driving Cars: The Technology, Capabilities, & Challenges
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwBmPiOmEGQ “2001: A Space Odyssey” (1970) Cultural associations of intelligent system-user interactions
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjGRySVyTDk “Dark Star” (1970) Cultural associations of intelligent system-user interactions
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5beTy9SnkU “The Forbin Project” (1970) Cultural associations of intelligent system-user interactions
    • 21 J E S S I C A F E R T I G + M E L I S S A A L T E N H O F E N + A D R I A N A G U Z M A N Pilot study 1: Supporting the health-impaired driver ❶ Detection ❷ Communication ❸ Immediate Attention ❹ System Intervention 1. DETECT: The health monitoring system will detect the driver’s vital signs and any abnormal behavioral factors and alert the driver as to potential trouble. 2. COMMUNICATE: Beth’s ability to communicate with the passenger and EMS in case of an emergency. 3. IMMEDIATE ATTENTION: Beth will immediately take over the steering wheel. It pull over the vehicle to the side of the road and notify emergency personnel. 4. SELF-DRIVING: In case of non-immediate EMS response or driver’s inability to drive himself to an ER, BETH will automatically take control of the vehicle and drive it to the nearest hospital or urgent care clinic.
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design public safety personal liberty high mortality/ property loss low mortality/ property loss
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design system status indicators driver behaviors and consequences risk escalation manufacturer parameter-setting user preference-setting user types: elders, family, teen, ill person driver models operating modes design strategy: business case positioning, incentives teams: topics, activities
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design ✓ What if your car could magically sense and alert you to dangers of potential collision. Is that capability something you might want in a car? Why?/Why not? ✓ Imagine for a moment that your car could warn you about the erratic behavior of an oncoming car. How would you react to that information? ✓ What if your car could sense your drifting off the road as you momentarily fall asleep at wheel. Should it alert you? If so, how? Should it alert other cars on the road? ✓ Consider a scenario wherein a member of your family is driving your car after drinking too much alcohol. The car is weaving in traffic and nearly misses hitting a pedestrian. If your car could sense this and do something about it, what should it do? ✓ Imagine a situation wherein you or your spouse is driving home after a long tiring day at work. Suddenly you experience chest pain and shortness of breath; you feel light-headed, beginning to black out. In a perfect world, If you car could somehow sense your distress and do something, what would it be? ✓ If your car could alert other cars to such dangers, should it? Why?/Why not? ✓ If cars could alert the police to such dangers, should it? Why?/Why not? Toward user mental models: Initiate conversations with potential users: Elders, parents of young children, teens (individuals in incapacitating situations)
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Card Sort: an activity that uses a themed set of cards and presents one concept on each card. Participants are asked to organize cards in ways that make sense to them. These activities illustrate participants' mental models of the information and themes of the cards and are useful in the interpretation and presentation of complex exhibition themes and topics.
    • title slide Lead insights and new value creation 25 February, 2011 Michael Eckersley, PhD michael@humancentered.nt Developing The Future of Driving Smart Systems to Keep Connected Drivers Safe 6 May, 2011 Michael Eckersley, PhD mde@ku.edu
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved http://vimeo.com/16227154 http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=I8biQ8dfC_U&list=PL93019A1526FC1BE 6&index=36&feature=plpp_video
    • Ross Dansby, Brook Graham, Tim Seley www.slideshare.net/timseley/adaptive-intelligence-dansby-graham-seley-final-ixd-presentation-6216981 Final Concept Prototype
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Chapter 6 Interface
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design interfaces: graphical, voice, gestural, haptic and holographic
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Interface: noun (thing) Interacting verb (experience)
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Bill Buxton on Natural User Interfaces http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcdrfacG_y4
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design Interface: Portable tactile affordance
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design 1:1 tool interface
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved Interaction Design NUI Research at KU Center For Design Research
    • Chapter 4 Computational Strategies of Representation
    • Cooking up a great algorithm
    • File: OSI-FinalRev21hirez2.pdf
    • Interaction Design INTERACTION DESIGN: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES ADS 765, ADS 560, INDD 578 (3 credits) Fall 2013 Tuesday 6:00–9:00p, CDR West Lawrence Campus, BEST245, Edwards Campus. Fall 2008 6. System Interfaces: Simple and Complex 06Sept 24, 2013 Law Grads: Devinee Fitzgerald, Cyrus Chengyang, Jessica Shomaker, Heba Abdulrahman Edw Grads: Alice Hahn, Peter Henne, Ashley Mahoney, Todd Register, Adam Roush, Laura Weible Law UGrads: Amber Hanschu, Lauren Lawton, Tyler Peuser, Samantha Thomas, Jessica Tungesvik