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Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization
 

Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization

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Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization, by Michael Eckersley, PhD

Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization, by Michael Eckersley, PhD

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    Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization Interaction Design 12/16-Design prototyping & information organization Presentation Transcript

    • 12 INTERACTION DESIGN: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES ! ADS 765, ADS 560, INDD 378 (3 credits) Fall 2013! ! Tuesday 6:00–9:00p, CDR West Lawrence Campus, BEST245, Edwards Campus. Nov 19, 2013 Fall 2008 12. Design Prototyping, Information Organization Law Grads: Cyrus Chengyang, Jessica Shomaker, Heba Abdulrahman Edw Grads: Alice Hahn, Peter Henne, Ashley Mahoney, Todd Register, Adam Roush, Laura Weible Law UGrads: Amber Hanschu, Lauren Lawton, Tyler Peuser, Samantha Thomas, Jessica Tungesvik Interaction Design
    • COURSE SCHEDULE Week Date LECTURE & DISCUSSION PROJECT E TONIT Ordering Information & Data Wk 11 Nov 19 Chapter 11: Design, Prototyping, Construction NEXT WEEK Wk 11 Nov 19 Research and Design Evaluation © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Chapter 12: Evaluation Intro pp. 433-454 Chapter 7. Spatial Design Strategies: “The Library Model”: pp. 191-203 http://spectrum.ieee.org/ automaton/robotics/artificialintelligence/how-google-selfdriving-car-works Read the above article and screen the embedded video, then post your best ideas on what the “beth” system persona should contain 
 (see P. 25 of deck) Interaction Design
    • Design, Prototyping, Construction © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • Key elements in the development of web-based software user experience design –JJ Garrett !4
    • The Library Model © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • N PR E PRO X OJ T JE W EC C E TT E K The UX of Smart Car Safety UNDERSTAND stated intent MAKE research & discovery REALIZE 4 weeks to go! Nov 5 • Project discussion: mental models data analysis • Team Presentations: concepts, options Nov 12 • • • Finish driver mental modeling & visualization 2nd iteration scenarios Technology state model © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Nov 19 • Present 3rd draft UX scenarios Nov 26 • • Develop detailed, annotated, portrayal of user-system actions and reactions Build-in relevant interactor personas, priorities backstory Dec 3 Dec 10 Dec 17 • Present finalized UX scenarios as part of merged presentation with the DM team Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T Discovering the driver’s mental model (toward an appropriate interaction model) Driver UX: ranking of situational concerns © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T The question (hypothesis): Would respondents empathize the experience of another person in a difficult situation? Could they imagine themselves responding realistically? Sort A: (Control) “As a driver, what considerations are generally most important to you?” ! Scenario B: “Imagine yourself as an elderly driver. Your are not as confident in your current driving ability as in years past. Family members are concerned. People seem nervous to ride with you as you have had some close calls. You want to keep driving, but you are secretly nervous about night driving and driving in heavy traffic.” ! Scenario C: “Imagine yourself as a parent of a teenager. S/he has recently received his/her driver’s license, and is eager to drive a group of friends to a distant sporting event Friday evening. They expect to return well after midnight.” ! Scenario D: “Imagine yourself as a parent driving home from a short family vacation. Your young children are in the back seat. It is dusk and everybody is tired, sleepy. You are on a two-lane highway. Lots of traffic, and a car is about to pass you at a high rate of speed. The driver is drunk.” ! Scenario E: “Imagine that your spouse is recovering from a recent stroke. S/he feels fine, is able to drive, but still at some risk of relapse.” © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • T C O JE P R Sort A: (Control) “As a driver, what considerations are generally most important to you?” ∑ ρ 130 248 249 277 306 308 309 311 313 335 337 353 378 387 397 402 405 406 472 487 498 561 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 ranking Safety Convenience Getting to destination Condition of car Enjoyment Driving ability Attentiveness Security Crashing Responsibility Violating the law Needing help Insurance costs Drunk drivers Killing disabling Calling texting Trust Falling asleep Privacy Embarrassment Boredom Anonymity © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • T C O JE R P ∑ ρ 110 122 148 151 161 166 184 186 188 194 204 220 231 237 242 247 260 265 268 281 282 339 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Scenario B: “Imagine yourself as an elderly driver. Your are not as confident in your current driving ability as in years past. Family members are concerned. People seem nervous to ride with you as you have had some close calls. You want to keep driving, but you are secretly nervous about night driving and driving in heavy traffic.” ranking Crashing Safety Falling asleep Needing help Getting to destination Driving ability Killing disabling Embarrassment Convenience Trust Attentiveness Security Violating the law Insurance costs Responsibility Condition of car Privacy Enjoyment Drunk drivers Boredom Calling texting Anonymity © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • T C O JE R P Scenario C: “Imagine yourself as a parent of a teenager. S/he has recently received his/ her driver’s license, and is eager to drive a group of friends to a distant sporting event Friday evening. They expect to return well after midnight.” ∑ ρ ranking 89 95 105 114 118 127 137 141 146 151 153 160 174 191 192 211 223 246 250 278 279 297 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Driving ability Safety Drunk drivers Trust Crashing Calling texting Insurance costs Responsibility Violating the law Getting to destination Condition of car Security Needing help Attentiveness Killing disabling Falling asleep Convenience Enjoyment Privacy Boredom Anonymity Embarrassment © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • T C O JE R P ∑ ρ 47 78 89 92 109 112 121 123 134 136 137 140 143 158 169 169 170 178 184 185 197 234 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Scenario D: “Imagine yourself as a parent driving home from a short family vacation. Your young children are in the back seat. It is dusk and everybody is tired, sleepy. You are on a two-lane highway. Lots of traffic, and a car is about to pass you at a high rate of speed. The driver is drunk.” ranking Safety Drunk drivers Crashing Attentiveness Driving ability Responsibility Trust Killing disabling Needing help Violating the law Getting to destination Falling asleep Insurance costs Condition of car Calling texting Security Privacy Enjoyment Boredom Embarrassment Convenience Anonymity © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • T C O JE R P Scenario E: “Imagine that your spouse is recovering from a recent stroke. S/he feels fine, is able to drive, but still at some risk of relapse. Please order these card topics in light of your concerns.” ∑ ρ ranking 54 64 66 76 82 111 122 125 128 134 160 160 167 172 174 177 184 189 203 208 209 234 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Needing help Driving ability Safety Responsibility Crashing Attentiveness Getting to destination Trust Killing disabling Condition of car Security Insurance costs Convenience Privacy Embarrassment Violating the law Falling asleep Calling texting Drunk drivers Enjoyment Boredom Anonymity © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • Ordinal (ranking) vs interval (rating) measures Spearman's Rank-Order Correlation Gross concerns vs subtle issues. Next step: Create an imaginative online Likert scale or Semantic Differential survey to tease out the informational, emotional subtleties. http://selection.datavisualization.ch http://www-958.ibm.com/software/ analytics/manyeyes/ © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! http://datavisualization.ch Interaction Design
    • Data Visualization infoaesthetics.com © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • manyeyes.com http://www.coolinfographics.com http://www.densitydesign.org/projects/ © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T User personas can help guide design (“thin” and useless vs “thick” and actionable) © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T The UX of Smart Car Safety Useful interactor personas and case scenarios user mental model scenario situations “Ann” overwhelmed novice elderly or driver rough, high-level complete Scenario: she gets overwhelmed by a dangerous traffic situation impaired cognitive abilities or distraction poses threat to herself and others driving behavior Team 2 Lawrence (Amber, Lauren, Tyler, Samantha) “The James Family” driving home they are imperiled by a drunk driver rough, high-level complete Scenario: driving home late at night, a drunk driver crosses the center line, heading straight for family Team 3 OP (Laura, Ashley, Alice) “Jack” driving drunk rough, high-level complete Scenario: after a football game he’s driving way over the legal limit, bad reaction times, weaving in traffic “Janice” health emergency in progress Scenario: she suffers onset diabetic shock symptoms while driving in rush hour internal impairment, threat external threat teams protagonists Team 1 Lawrence (Jessica, Jessica, Heba, Cyrus) Team 4 OP (Peter, Adam, Todd) © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T Getting to know your characters/interactors • Crashing • Safety • Falling asleep • Needing help • Getting to destination • Driving ability • Killing disabling • Embarrassment • Safety • Drunk drivers • Crashing • Attentiveness • Driving ability • Responsibility “James Family” “Ann” (72 year-old driver, overwhelmed in routine rush-hour traffic) (driving home they are imperiled by a drunk driver) Scenario: she gets overwhelmed by a dangerous traffic situation impaired cognitive abilities or distraction poses threat to herself and others driving behavior Scenario: driving home late at night, a drunk driver crosses the center line, heading straight for family • No mental model (yet) for the drunk driver. Want to construct one? “Jack” (28 year-old drunk driver) Scenario: after a football game he’s driving way over the legal limit, bad reaction times, weaving in traffic © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! “Beth” (2016 Smart Car) • Needing help • Driving ability • Safety • Responsibility • Crashing • Attentiveness “Janice” (52 year-old diabetic ) Scenario: she suffers onset diabetic shock symptoms while driving in rush hour Interaction Design Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T What logics are they (or should they) build
 into the smart/autonomous car system? the smart car persona Q: What logic or “reasoning” should guide its choices in the role of driver, co-driver? Q: How should the driver roles be handed off? Q: How far ahead can it sense (“see”)? Q: What interaction style should it present to the human driver? Q: Who’s safety should it deem most important? Internal passengers? external cars? pedestrians? © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • Feedback for next week © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T http://vimeo.com/79756307 My feedback: The video captures the action, but the problem with video is it runs too fast, missing the real story of what’s going on second by second. I recommend putting your video in a slide deck with a introductory slide to set up the situation and introduce interactor persona. Show the whole video, if you like, on the second page, but then on the succeeding pages, break down what happened second by second. Kind of slow it down: annotate short explanation of the tech involved, how the perceives the situation, how control is negotiated or passed, how urgency alerts are handled. Explain what’s really going on, probably too fast to apprehend in real time. Sketch out an appropriate, concise persona for your interactor character Adam, Todd, Peter Oncoming drunker driver scenario http://vimeo.com/79756307 © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T My feedback: Rough at this point, but good work. I like your effort to script and act out the scenario, getting a feel for situation (with distractions) in which the interactors are set. There are problems with how the driver had to scroll on a console (gps?) display—that’s unsafe. Recommend killing it and rely either on “Siri” (voice) fully, or include good old hard console push buttons. If the driver know’s where she’s going, why have the map being displayed? On your next iteration, try setting the scene in a car, simplify the script— get a third person to narrate—or edit it in later. Let the driver drive and interact. Because so much interaction is packed into the scenario, I suggest breaking the video into chunks and spreading them across multiple deck pages, allowing you to show the full story of what’s going on on multiple levels. Sketch out an appropriate, concise persona for your interactor character Jessica, Jessica, Heba https://www.dropbox.com/s/5c9at24vigykhok/Teen%20Drivers.mov © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T Sketch out an appropriate, concise persona for your interactor character My feedback: Good effort. Shows thought and some imagination. On your next iteration, I recommend embedding sound files on each page for the narrator role, the “beth” voice, selected sound effects. In fact, you may just act it out certain segments to get the effect of real time action. Just embed the video files. I like how you adapted an existing console screen. P2-Jack persona needs a bit more back story, character development. P4 not necessary. P5 recognition info is implicit, behind the scenes, doesn’t need to be displayed. P7-8. Predetermined destination optional, not necessity. Maybe he just drives away—it’s not the car’s business as Jack’s in control. If the car detects unusual driving behavior (compared to Jack’s historical norm), that’s powerful telemetric evidence, and should trigger escalating alerts, even potential control hand-off. Talk to others about how the alerts and control issues should be handled. The “three strikes” rule seems simple, but consider the degrees and variables of alerts and control and try alternatives until you find the one that works best. You may research practical tech feasibility of biometric detection of alcohol in air or on skin, and if you feel strongly about it, include it, but add annotations explaining the tech, it’s feasibility and likely cost outfitting it on every car. Think thru the conditional logic of letting Jack drive post-detection. If he’s not a serial drunk driver (known to the “beth” system), or having some kind of health event, “beth” can be agnostic as to the cause of the problem—only that his driving is potentially dangerous to himself and others. Please kill the seatbelt tightening; it masochistic. -ME P.S. Check out the following page for actions in contingent situations. Alice, Laura, Ashley © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • S M P AR R O T JE C C AR T Sketch out an appropriate, concise persona for your interactor character My feedback: Your team’s is the trickiest of the four interaction scenarios because the primary threat is external, not internal to the car. That means the car (sensing the threat possibly before the human driver does) becomes the key interactor—or does it? We’ve seen videos portraying evasive test breaking and steering, so this isn’t science fiction, exactly. Maybe we shouldn’t even infer that the oncoming car’s driver is drunk, but simply poses a threat. Is the human driver left out of the equation? If he is alerted should he be given the chance to evade collision? Or if “beth” system concludes that his actions are prone to result in collision, should she take over? I’m skeptical about the cost viability and technical feasibility of deploying external airbags. I’d kill them unless you have some compelling evidence. Oncoming drunker driver scenario ! Finally, for next week continue to think thru the options and test out alternative scenarios to this one. Don’t be too believing. https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=h3jBYwkB2q4&list=PL93019A1526FC1BE6 ! Read pages 10-15 of the doc below to get a sense of the grades of sensing technology involved. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B36lumQNuqxZDkwR3RSQWpVZjA/edit?usp=sharing © HumanCentered 2007, All Rights Reserved! Interaction Design
    • 12 INTERACTION DESIGN: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES ! ADS 765, ADS 560, INDD 378 (3 credits) Fall 2013! ! Tuesday 6:00–9:00p, CDR West Lawrence Campus, BEST245, Edwards Campus. Nov 19, 2013 Fall 2008 12. Design Prototyping, Information Organization Law Grads: Cyrus Chengyang, Jessica Shomaker, Heba Abdulrahman Edw Grads: Alice Hahn, Peter Henne, Ashley Mahoney, Todd Register, Adam Roush, Laura Weible Law UGrads: Amber Hanschu, Lauren Lawton, Tyler Peuser, Samantha Thomas, Jessica Tungesvik Interaction Design