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Session1 methods research_question

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How research methods relate to the research question - new media research methods.

How research methods relate to the research question - new media research methods.

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  • Is it clear, specific, and feasible for you to answer adequately in the time available?Is it linked to your project goal?What is the target audience? – is your question relevant for the audience?What are you hoping to achieve?How are you going to study this? How best to collect this data? How many people will you need to involve?What can influence your outcomes?
  • Netnography is the branch of ethnography that analyses the free behaviour of individuals on the Internet that uses online marketing research techniques to provide useful insights. The word “netnography” comes from “Inter[net]” and “eth[nography]” and was a process and term coined by Dr. Robert V. Kozinets. As a method, “netnography” can be faster, simpler, and less expensive than ethnography, and more naturalistic and unobtrusive than focus groups or interviews (Kozinets, 2010), (del Fresno, 2011). Netnography is similar to ethnography in five ways: 1. It is naturalistic 2. It is immersive 3. It is descriptive 4. It is multi-method 5. It is adaptable. It provides information on the symbolism, meanings, and consumption patterns of online consumer groups (Kozinets, 2010) or online communities consumption unrelated but online sociability based on the exchange of information (del Fresno, 2011). Netnography is focused on cultural, symbolic o information insights.
  • In general, a walkthrough has one or two broad objectives: to gain feedback about the technical quality or content of the document; and/or to familiarize the audience with the content.A walkthrough is normally organized and directed by the author of the technical document. Any combination of interested or technically qualified personnel (from within or outside the project) may be included as seems appropriate.Typically four questions are asked::Will the user try to achieve the effect that the subtask has? Does the user understand that this subtask is needed to reach the user's goal?Will the user notice that the correct action is available? E.g. is the button visible?Will the user understand that the wanted subtask can be achieved by the action? E.g. the right button is visible but the user does not understand the text and will therefore not click on it.Does the user get feedback? Will the user know that they have done the right thing after performing the action?By answering the questions for each subtask usability problems will be noticed
  • Task analysis is the analysis of how a task is accomplished, including a detailed description of both manual and mental activities, task and element durations, task frequency, task allocation, task complexity, environmental conditions, necessary clothing and equipment, and any other unique factors involved in or required for one or more people to perform a given task.[1] Task analysis emerged from research in applied behavior analysis and still has considerable research in that area.Information from a task analysis can then be used for many purposes, such as personnel selection and training, tool or equipment design,[2] procedure design (e.g., design of checklists or decision support systems) and automation. Though very distinct, task analysis is related to user analysis.

Session1 methods research_question Session1 methods research_question Presentation Transcript

  • New Media Research MethodsPart 1 – How researchmethods relate to theresearch questionPart 2- Qualitative andQuantitativePart 3 – Data collectionPart 4 – Presentation andanalysis
  • New Media Research Methods- Part 1Using Methods, Data and Tools to explore User’s Experience. How methods relate to research questions? Gosia Kwiatkowska gosia@uel.ac.uk
  • Research questionGeneralFocusedRefined View slide
  • VariablesIndependent IV – causeDependent DV – effect, response – that you measure View slide
  • What is your research question?General - Is it clear and specific?Focused - Is it feasible in the time allowed?Refined - Clear, specific, feasible and relevant for the target audience
  • Good question“Well-crafted questions guide the systematic planning of research. Formulating your questions precisely enables you to design a study with a good chance of answering them.” Light, Singer, Willett (1990)
  • Research terminology• Method – the process of gathering and analysing data about a user experience.! It is also how you approach the relation between IV and DV.
  • Research terminology• Data – refers to factual or sensory information taken from your tests, observations, surveysetc.
  • Research terminology• Tools – ‘instruments’ you use to ask your research question.
  • Think about the stages of your method!• Logic• Choice of tools• How the data captured feeds into the next phase of testing?
  • Convenience + Design – Cost = User Experience http://www.nnyman.com/personal/2005/11/18/the-user-experience-equation/
  • Analysis DesignImplementation New Media Research process
  • Beginning the process of UX research • Brainstorming ideas • Who are the users? And what are their needs?Analysis – Tools: • Observations • Questionnaires • Interviews • Focus groups • Ethnography • Personas
  • Observations• Interactions• Human dynamics• Patterns• Full picture• but can be subjective
  • Questionnaires• Cheap and quick• Easy• Q’s and A’s standardised• Mainly quantitative• Cross-sectional• Replicable
  • Interviews• Meanings• Perceptions• Understanding• Interpretations• Experiences• Qualitative
  • Focus groups• Perceptions• Opinions• Concepts• Experiences• Qualitative• Larger groups
  • Ethnography• Participation• Observation• Experience• Natural settings• Why, how, who, where…• Netnography(Robert V. Kozinets)
  • Personas • Made up • User friendly • Used for testinghttp://www.webcredible.co.uk/user-friendly-resources/web-usability/personas.shtml
  • UX research – what are you looking for? • What data? • How are you going to capture it? • How will this data inform the nextAnalysis phase?
  • User’s mental model vs your initial design? • Conceptual design model: – Walkthroughs – Scenarios – Card sortsDesign – Prototypes Set up a design phase to include early paper prototypes to confirm what you have designed corresponds with the user’s mental model.
  • Walkthroughs• Task specific• Learning through experiences• Usability issues
  • Scenarios• Questions• Tasks or goals• Stories• Reasons• Focus on the user• Test personas
  • Card sorts• Grouping• Organising• Renaming groups
  • UX research – what are you looking for? • What data? • How are you going to capture it? • How will this data inform the nextDesign phase?
  • UX research – functionality and aesthetics • From paper prototype to beta versions- testing basicImplementation functionality and design aesthetic. • What aspects to you need/want to understand more about?
  • UX research – emotional design • Tasks •Implementation Levels of frustration/satisfaction • Errors • Specific responses to your aesthetics
  • UX research – what tools? • Observations •Implementation Think aloud • Post test questionnaire • Heuristic testing • Task based tests
  • Observations• Tasks• Levels of frustration/satisfaction• Errors• Specific responses to your aesthetics
  • Think aloud• Tasks• Levels of frustration/satisfaction• Errors• Specific responses to your aesthetics
  • Post test questionnaires• Tasks• Levels of frustration/satisfaction• Errors• Specific responses to your aesthetics
  • Heuristics – Nielson’s ‘Rules of Thumb’1. Visibility of system status2. Match between system and the real world3. User control and freedom4. Consistency and standards5. Error prevention6. Recognition rather than recall7. Flexibility and efficiency of use8. Aesthetic and minimalist design9. Help users recognise, diagnose, and recover from errors10. Help and documentation
  • Task based questionnaires
  • UX research – what are you looking for? • What data? • How are you going to capture it?Implementation • How will this data inform the next phase?
  • Analysis DesignImplementation Research process
  • Research Question?“Well-crafted questions guide the systematic planning of research. Formulating your questions precisely enables you to design a study with a good chance of answering them.” Light, Singer, Willett (1990)
  • Activity• Refine your research question: – Is your question clear and relevant to your goal? – What is your target audience? – What is your independent variable? – What is your dependent variable? – What kind of research methods you might need to use? – What can impact or influence your findings? – What you will need to use to collect data? – Will your research influence users? How?
  • References• Light, Singer, Willett, By Design (1990)• http://www.nnyman.com/personal/2005/11/ 18/the-user-experience-equation/• Kozinets, Robert V. (2010), “Netnography: The Marketer’s Secret Weapon”; White Paper.