JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 1
JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 2
Insert Name
Job Title
Contact Details
Librarians are welcome to adapt ...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 3
The Vision
The UK education community will have access to quality
e-bo...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 4
Wanted: Textbooks!
There is a demand for core reading list e-books
in ...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 5
Why the project?
 Different selling chain
 What business models?
Wha...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 6
Why UK higher education has not bought more
e-books
 E-book pricing m...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 7
Is there any pressure on you to develop e-book
collections in your lib...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 8
Roles for JISC Collections as a consortia in e-
books acquisition
 Se...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 9
Project Aims
1. license collections of e-books that are highly relevan...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 10
Getting the bids in
 Issued ITT
 Persuading publishers and aggregat...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 11
Selecting the right e-books
 Consultation methodology
– at the time ...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 12
Meeting Expectations
 Want a core collection of e-books
 Want good ...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 13
Licensing
Compliance with the Open URL standard is: No. of responses
...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 14
Licensing
Allowing users to provide access to the e-books via links
d...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 15
Promotion and MARC records
 Quality assured MARC records
 One stop ...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 16
Deep Log Analysis
 The aims of the DLA study are to:
• monitor, anal...
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 17
The future
Collaboration and sharing
JISC Collections
19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 18
Thank you
Thank you for listening
www.jiscebooksproject.org
c.milloy@...
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JISC National E Books Observatory - The Challenges

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  • Good Afternoon
    So to start I am just going to say what the Vision for e-books is, what the JISC national e-books observatory project is about and then talk a little about the challenges that have been faced so far in the project.
  • The UK Academic Vision and the role of JISC Collections
    The vision was created last year by the JISC Collections e-books working group which consists of UK librarians who are experts in e-book and who advise JISC Collections in the licensing of e-books.
    So what is the vision? That e-books that are highly relevant to student study will be available, that there will be flexible business model, and licensing models that allow users to use the e-books according to their needs and that all these e-books will be easy to find and will meet the required standards to ensure interoperability and integration.
  • In terms of content, what the e-books working group is talking about here is those e-books that are currently not being made available by publishers – textbooks, recommended reading, books on reading lists….all the book that bring in high revenues for publishers due to student sales. Currently we are in a catch 22 situation because as these e-books are not available it is hard for libraries to demonstrate demand and therefore the publishers do not see enough potential revenue to risk their established print sales streams from students.
  • And it is understandable that publishers don’t want to risk putting their core textbooks online and sell them through the library because Libraries represent a completely different route to market for e-book publishers and the book selling chain changes quite dramatically. Currently no one knows what will be the most appropriate models as there is just not enough evidence of exactly how students will use e-books if they are made freely available through the library.
    This is why publishers' have been slow to make their core textbooks available online, but to move the market forward and to take the first steps towards achieving the Vision, someone had to take the lead and gather this evidence. The e-books working group commission therefore commissioned A Feasibility Study on the Acquisition of E-books in Higher Education and the role of the JISC.
    A Feasibility study: The study looked at the acquisition of TEXTBOOKS by HE libraries and explored what the role of the JISC might be in a market that has traditionally sold direct to the user.
  • Questions and results from the feasibility study show…….
  • Cont……
  • The Feasibility Study provided JISC Collections with clear evidence that it did have a role in the e-books market and that UK HE institutions expected JISC Collections to take the lead. Subsequently, JISC Collections was awarded 768k to undertake a national project.
  • There are three mains aims to the project:
    license for two year only collections of e-books that are highly relevant to UK higher education taught course students in four discipline areas:
    Business and Management studies
    Engineering
    Medicine (not mental health or nursing)
    Media Studies
    The project will evaluate the use of the e-books through deep log analysis. The deep log data will provide quantitative information about user behaviours and patterns of use. This will be supplemented by qualitative data from user surveys to explain the patterns of use. Thus we will be able to find out not only the who what when and where but why users did what they did. This data will be used to inform future strategies on the promotion and design of e-books and to asses the impact of ‘free at the point of use’ e-books upon publishers, aggregators and libraries.
    Knowledge acquired in the project will be transferred to publishers, aggregators and libraries and internationally to help stimulate an e-books market that has appropriate and flexible business and licensing models.
  • JISC Collections went through European procurement and issued an invitation to tender to publishers and aggregators. The tender asked for core reading list e-books, latest editions, post 2000, print sales and the fee they would charge for a two year licence taking into consideration the data they would receive back from the deep log analysis. JISC Collections knew that they would have to persuade some publishers even though they were offering to pay them a fee for the e-books that were selected and licensed to help mitigate risks in revenue loss
    A briefing event that was attended by over 20 publishers and aggregators was held. The questions received primarily revolved around money, for example, would JISC Collections fund the digitisation of texts? (NO), would JISC be involved in the business arrangements between the publishers and the aggregator? (NO), would JISC purchase the titles at the end of the project (NO) and who would manage the relationships with the bookshops? (Not JISC). At the end of the event JISC Collections felt that they had got the message across that the project involves collaboration and some risks, but that there were significant advantages to taking part. At UKSG in April I rallied the publishers / aggregators.
    11 bids were received which was very pleasing, however after reading some of them there was frustration that they were not engaging with the spirit of the project and were not taking the bull by the horns and taking this opportunity to take a chance. It was felt by the project board that their reluctance to embrace the project was in fact simply delaying an inevitable change, especially when print sales are shown to be declining year upon year….But not all was lost; some of bids met the requirements and embraced the chance to experiment in a safe environment. Very encouraging, very wise!
    So what did I find out?
    The one thing that really struck me from all the conversations I had with publishers was that there was no single e-books department responsible for putting the bid together, rather several departments had to be consulted; textbooks, sales, those in charge of platforms, finance, rights and so on.
    Back in 2005, the JISC e-books working group held a number of meetings with publishers who said that they did not yet have an e-books strategy as they were unsure of the market. Two years later and I sensed that although progress had been made, they were still dipping their toes in the water and waiting for someone else to dive in the deep end before them.
  • The next challenge was selecting e-books from the bids that would meet the needs of taught course students in medicine, media studies, business and management studies and engineering. The Project Board was consulted as was the Library and Advisory Working Group to find the most effective way of ranking a potential 3,000 e-books. Not an easy task; where one institution has reading lists another has recommended texts, where one institution receives the next years reading list by June, another one doesn’t receive anything and where one institution has a specific subject librarian in charge another one has no one specific. The consultation therefore had to cater for a variety of ways of identifying and ranking the e-books. 6 bids made it through to the consultation equating to a total of 136 e-books; 7 media studies e-books, 29 engineering e-books, 42 medicine e-books and 58 business and management e-books.
    The value placed by the publishers on these 136 e-books, with free at the point of use access, for all UK HE institutions (that’s over 2.4 million students and their tutors) was £2.08 million excluding VAT! The consultation process enabled JISC Collections to prioritise within the £600,000 funding available.
    JISC Collections received over 70 institutional responses to the consultation. Such a fantastic response shows the interest in this area is very high and that there is a strong desire for the e-books market to progress forward, so thank you!
  • The finalisation of the selection was the next challenge, we had to ensure that not only were we selecting the highest ranked e-books within the budget but that we also met the needs of the community in terms of use of the e-books and access to the e-books.
    It was not an easy task for the project board, particularly when the average price for each of the e-books included in the Business and Management collection was £60k. At such prices the £600k would not allow us to license as many books as had originally hoped.
    In addition, the consultation feedback told us that some bids should and should not proceed further as they did not meet required technical standards and terms of use; better to drop the texts from bidders that would not allow you print, copy, paste or where they could not offer COUNTER statistics or allow linking from the VLE.
    This meant that they were left with two bids, both from aggregators rather than publishers which in turn made it impossible for us to force the publishers to make their texts available on more than one platform through a licence. We knew that many institutions would not be current subscribers to these platforms so to reduce the barriers we ensured that there were no access fees.
    We ended up with 36 e-books in total, 26 available through MyiLibrary and 10 through Wolters Kluwer. Although you may think this is quite a small collection, it is important to remember that it is costing over 600K, that there is unlimited access for all UK HE students and that the terms and conditions in the licence are very good. In addition the deep log analysis of the e-books will provide us with the in-depth data required to inform future business and licensing models that meet the needs and expectations of all - and then the publishers will make available their core textbooks.
  • In my project plan, I allocated myself a month to create a new licence specifically for the project and to do all the negotiations. I always knew that I would be pushing it but I had no other options as I knew I had to make sure the e-books were available for the start of the new term.
    The creation of the licence was not too bad, based on the JISC model licence, I added in new things such as the DDA, submission of the e-books into the JISC plagiarism service, statements about COUNTER statistics…all based on the response that I got from the librarians in the consultation. I knew from the responses that compliance with the DDA was essential, that COUNTER was a very high priority, that compliance with OpenURL was also essential.
  • I also knew that librarians considered the ability to print, save and link directly from the VLE to the e-books as highly essential. This was great evidence and I used it to negotiate with.
  • The final challenges are getting the MARC records QA and made available in one place and providing promotional material.
  • Running for a year.
    Provide us with an evidence base which will inform future models for e-books that are based on what users are actually doing rather than what we think they are doing.
    Tell us if there is an impact on the print sales and what this might be! Help remove the uncertainty about the market so that we can all move forward and move us closer to our Vision for e-books.
  • Slide 16The Future Vision
    This project is the first of many steps towards achieving the UK Academic Vision for e-books but it is not working alone. Individual HE institutions are themselves exploring models, there are project happening across the world, publishers are dipping their toes in the water and e-book aggregators are working in collaboration with institutions and consortia. Achieving the vision will therefore require everyone to adopt the attitude of the new millenials where sharing fosters learning.
  • Thank you for listening. The project website is www.jiscebooksproject.org and there are links there to all the reports mentioned and the e-book vision.
  • Transcript of "JISC National E Books Observatory - The Challenges"

    1. 1. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 1
    2. 2. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 2 Insert Name Job Title Contact Details Librarians are welcome to adapt this presentation to suit their needs, it provides a good overview of the need for a project and explains why libraries can not currently meet the needs of their students as the texts they need are not available. The e-books market and the UK Academic Vision for e-books
    3. 3. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 3 The Vision The UK education community will have access to quality e-book content that is of high relevance to teaching, learning and research across the broadest range of subject areas. Flexible business and licensing models will support a diversity of needs, allowing users to do what they want when they want and how they want for education purposes. All e-books will be easily discoverable and consistent standards will allow all content to be fully integrated into library, learning and research environments. E-Books Working Group 2007
    4. 4. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 4 Wanted: Textbooks! There is a demand for core reading list e-books in my institution but these are not being made available and when I ask publishers why they say that there is no evidence of the demand and thus they are reluctant to make these e- books available. But if they don’t make the core titles available online then users are not as interested and therefore the level of demand seems low.
    5. 5. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 5 Why the project?  Different selling chain  What business models? What licensing models?  Not sure what e-books are available  Who should take the lead?
    6. 6. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 6 Why UK higher education has not bought more e-books  E-book pricing models are not satisfactory (64%)  There is too little choice of e-book titles (62%)  E-book access models are not satisfactory (53%)  We are waiting for the market to settle down (33%)  We are waiting for JISC Collections to offer better e- book deals (30%)  E-books are too expensive (28%)  I do not know what is available (18%)  There is no demand for e-books here (13%)  Affiliated/ external users are not allowed access (11%)  The technology is too complicated (8%)
    7. 7. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 7 Is there any pressure on you to develop e-book collections in your library?  Yes 68% No 32%  If there is pressure, where is that coming from? – Librarians (54%) – Students (38%) – Teachers (27%) – Management (23%) – Researchers (9%)
    8. 8. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 8 Roles for JISC Collections as a consortia in e- books acquisition  Seeking to get the best buys for the sector – national VFM role (87%)  Investigating innovative formats or purchasing models that are being offered (66%)  Buying resources that are essential in niche areas for research and teaching where the users would not be able to afford it without help (40%)
    9. 9. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 9 Project Aims 1. license collections of e-books that are highly relevant to UK higher education taught course students in four discipline areas: – Business and Management studies – Engineering – Medicine (not mental health or nursing) – Media Studies 2. evaluate the use of the e-books through deep log analysis and to asses the impact of the ‘free at the point of use’ e-books upon publishers, aggregators and libraries 3. transfer knowledge acquired in the project to publishers, aggregators and libraries to help stimulate an e-books market that has appropriate business and licensing models
    10. 10. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 10 Getting the bids in  Issued ITT  Persuading publishers and aggregators to bid  11 bids received – some good some not so good!  Findings – Hesitant to take the leap required! – Not all publishers are ready to move forward and even if they are, a lack of strategy and coordination can hold them back
    11. 11. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 11 Selecting the right e-books  Consultation methodology – at the time was looking at over 3000 e-books! – each institution is different  6 bids = 136 books The value placed by the publishers on these 136 e- books, with free at the point of use access, for all UK HE institutions (that’s over 2.4 million students and their tutors) was £2.08 million excluding VAT! The consultation process enabled JISC Collections to prioritise within the £600,000 funding available.
    12. 12. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 12 Meeting Expectations  Want a core collection of e-books  Want good terms and conditions of use  Want the e-books on the platforms already using  Findings: – High fees to protect revenue – Lack of standards compliance – Aggregators platforms
    13. 13. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 13 Licensing Compliance with the Open URL standard is: No. of responses 1 38 2 15 3 13 4 5 5 0 6 1 7 0 blank 1 Compliance with the distributed searching standard Z39.50 is: No. of responses 1 28 2 17 3 18 4 4 5 1 6 2 7 1 blank 2 Compliance with the Disability Discrimination Act Standards is: No. of responses 1 52 2 11 3 5 4 2 5 0 6 1 7 1 blank 1 Compliance with W3C Double-A (priority 2) is: No. of responses 1 26 2 18 3 17 4 3 5 0 6 2 7 2 blank 5
    14. 14. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 14 Licensing Allowing users to provide access to the e-books via links direct from the VLE/MLE is: No. of respon ses 1 51 2 15 3 5 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 1 blank 1 Allowing users to electronically save parts of the e-books is: No. of respon ses 1 32 2 13 3 21 4 5 5 0 6 1 7 1 blank 0 Allowing users to print out copies of parts of the e-books is: No. of responses 1 50 2 16 3 4 4 0 5 1 6 0 7 2 blank 0 Allowing users to incorporate parts of the e- books but not the whole e-book into a VLE/MLE is: No. of responses 1 19 2 17 3 27 4 6 5 0 6 3 7 1 blank 0
    15. 15. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 15 Promotion and MARC records  Quality assured MARC records  One stop shop for the MARC records –NEOCaR: (JISC National E-books Observatory Catalogue Records) will provide librarians with a single download process for the MARC 21 records for all the e-books licensed as part of the project  Promotional materials that can be customised – News of the day – What’s new? – Emails to staff / departments – Bookmarks
    16. 16. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 16 Deep Log Analysis  The aims of the DLA study are to: • monitor, analyse and evaluate the usage of the e-books included in the project through deep log analysis techniques • assess, understand and report on the behaviours of users through surveys informed by the deep log data • analyse the deep log data for each title in the collection against the print sales figures provided by the publishers / aggregators over the lifetime of the study and for the past three years • analyse the deep log data for each e-book in the project against the ‘print circulation data’ provided by librarians over the lifetime of the study
    17. 17. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 17 The future Collaboration and sharing
    18. 18. JISC Collections 19 March 2015 | ILI 2007 | Slide 18 Thank you Thank you for listening www.jiscebooksproject.org c.milloy@jisc.ac.uk 02030066003 07817030769
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