Using social media for better reporting - Millie Khanna 2 of 2
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Using social media for better reporting - Millie Khanna 2 of 2

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In today's world where people bring you the news through #socialmedia it is important for journalists to get the hang of social media and leverage it for better research & for furthering their reach. ...

In today's world where people bring you the news through #socialmedia it is important for journalists to get the hang of social media and leverage it for better research & for furthering their reach. You can deliver news & opinions only after you reach your audience. Here are some #SEO #tips n tricks, and some social platforms that can be leveraged for this.

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Using social media for better reporting - Millie Khanna 2 of 2 Using social media for better reporting - Millie Khanna 2 of 2 Presentation Transcript

  • USING  SOCIAL  MEDIA  FOR  BETTER   REPORTING    -­‐  part  2  of  2   Millie  Khanna,   Director  –  Social  Media  &  CreaFve  Strategy   OMLogic  ConsulFng  Pvt  Ltd     At  exchange4media,  NOIDA,  India  
  • THE  IDEAL  RESEARCH  CHECKLIST   Ø  Blog:  Expressive,  Engages  Readers,  Quality   CuraFon,  AQract  like  minds.   Ø  LinkedIn:  IniFates  and  parFcipates  in   discussions,  Impressive  professional  network.   Ø  Facebook  :  Ease  in  maintaining  informal   relaFonships  and  quality  of  interacFons.   Ø  Twi4er:  Wide  network  ,  balanced  parFcipaFon     BE  THERE.  BE  SOCIAL.  
  • THE  IDEAL  RESEARCH  CHECKLIST   Ø  Scribd  /  Slideshare  :  Knowledge  sharing  ,   constant  learning  ,  quality  of  ideas   Ø  Flickr:  CreaFve  and  aestheFc  bent  of  mind  ,   right  brain  engagement   Ø  YouTube:  Comfort  with  mulFple  modes  of   communicaFon  and  expression  
  • START  A  BLOG  -­‐  FREE  AVAILABLE  FROM  WORDPRESS,   BLOGGER,  REDIFF…  
  • MAKING  YOUR  BLOG  COUNT   •  Share  interesFng  things  about  your  area  of  research.   •  Provides  glimpses  into  your  life  outside  of  work  –     family,  friends,  hobbies,  etc.   •  Link  your  social  networking  profiles   •  Talk  about  projects  which  led  to  the  research.  Make  it  Human   •  Include  a  link  to  your  personal  profile.   •  Keep  your  blog  non-­‐controversial   •  Appreciate  comments  and  thank  them  
  • WHY  BLOG?   1.  Blogging  captures  the  moment   2.  Blogging  frees  you  from  the  dictates  of  length   3.  Blogs  contain  mulFtudes   4.  Blogging  enables  greater  breadth  of  coverage   5.  Blogging  enables  greater  depth  of  coverage   6.  Blogging  keeps  Mainstream  Media  honest   7.  Blogging  keeps  bloggers  honest   8.  Blogging  enables  the  Long  Tail  of  Opinion   9.  Blogging  breaks  down  geographical  barriers   10.  Blogging  can  help  you  find  your  voice  as  a  writer   11.  Blogging  sharpens  your  craf  as  a  writer   12.  Blogging  rewards  merit   13.  Blogging  expands  your  world    -­‐  Amit  Varma,  Veteran  Blogger,  India  Uncut   hQp://indiauncut.com/iublog/arFcle/the-­‐big-­‐deal-­‐about-­‐ blogging/  
  • SEO  IS  NOT  THE  ENEMY  OF  GOOD  WRITING   Create  a  balance  
  • STAY  ON  TOP     Consume  as  much  informaFon  as  you  can.   IGNORANCE  IS  NOT  AN  EXCUSE  IN  THE  ERA  OF   INTERNET.  
  • FOLLOW  THE  RIGHT  PEOPLE   Consume  as  much  informaFon  as  you  can   “Move  in  the  right  circles”.  Follow  the  people  relevant  to   your  domain.  Schmooze  them.    
  • HAVE  TO  BE  MULTI-­‐SKILLED   Photography   Video  ediFng   Be  a  generalist.  But  find   your  specializaFon.   SEO   By-­‐lines  are  sFll  the  most   important  currency.   Where  you  get  it  from   is  rapidly  changing.  
  • MAKE  FRIENDS  AND  INFLUENCE  PEOPLE  ONLINE   Use  these  principles  on   Facebook  and  TwiQer  
  • DON’T  USE  AN  INFORMATION  ONLY  BECAUSE  SOMEONE   TWEETED  IT   #BasicsOfJournalism   #CommonSense  
  • WHATEVER  YOU  DO,  DON’T  DO  THIS:   #BasicsOfJournalism   #CommonSense  
  • PLAGIARISM  IS  A  MORTAL  SIN.  MOREOVER  NOT  GOOD  FOR  SEO.   And  frankly,  it’s   just  not  cool  bro!   You  WILL   get  caught.     #BasicsOfJournalism   #CommonSense  
  • LINK  DESCRIPTIVELY  AND  RELEVANTLY   •  Link  to  your  previous  arFcles  to  give  some  background   •  Don’t  just  link  using  useless  text  like  ‘click  here  for  my  previous   arFcle’  or  ‘for  more  informaFon  click  here’  –  use  your   headlines  or  relevant  keywords.   •  Search  engines  look  at  the  hyperlinked  anchor  text  to  help   assess  the  relevance  of  a  page  to  certain  keywords.  By  linking   using  your  (already  opFmised)  headline,  you  give  your  last   arFcle  an  SEO  boost.  
  • PARTICIPATE  IN  ONLINE  DISCUSSIONS   •  Dive  into  threads,  like  Media  Rant  on  HotWired  or  the  media   conference  on  the  WELL.  Post  messages  to  Usenet   newsgroups,  mailing  lists  and  Web  publicaFons'  feedback  and   leQer  secFons.  
  • USE  THE  LANGUAGE  OF  YOUR  TARGET  AUDIENCE   •  Use  Keyword  tools  to  find  the  search  volume  around  different   terms.     •  Are  more  people  searching  for  President  Obama  or  Barack   Obama?     •  Remember,  matching  your  content  to  your  readers’  searches  in   this  way  will  get  you  more  traffic  from  search  engines.   hQp://www.wordtracker.com/academy/seo-­‐Fps-­‐ meda-­‐journalists    
  • USE  THE  LANGUAGE  OF  YOUR  TARGET  AUDIENCE  
  • ORGANIZE  YOUR  CONTENT  IN  A  LOGICAL  WAY   •  Could  a  user  find  the  content  she  is  looking  for  just  by  clicking?   •  If  the  answer  is  no,  you  should  change  it.  It’s  bad  for  users  and  it’s  bad  for   search  engines.     •  Think  about  the  topics  you’re  wriFng  about,  could  they  all  be  arranged  into   categories?  If  it’s  a  recipe  site  for  example,  maybe  you  could  have  Italian,   Chinese,  Thai  or  Chicken,  Beef,  Vegetables?   hQp://www.wordtracker.com/academy/seo-­‐Fps-­‐ meda-­‐journalists    
  • DON’T  DUPLICATE.  DON’T  DUPLICATE.   •  Do  you  write  for  a  blog  or  an  online  newspaper,  but  want  to  have  your  own  arFcles  on  your   personal  blog?  In  that  case  you’re  beQer  off  just  linking  out  to  the  arFcles,  rather  than   duplicaFng  them.     •  Or  you  could  use  the  canonical  tag,  to  ensure  that  google  knows  that  you’re  not  trying  to  pull  a   fast  one.  So  if  you’ve  wriQen  an  arFcle  about  Obama’s  latest  speech  on  the  economy,  on  your   blog,  www.yourblog.com/poliFcs/obama-­‐gives-­‐speech-­‐on-­‐economy,  put  the  following  line  of   code  in  the  secFon  of  the  page:   <link  rel="canonical"  href="hQp://www.youremployer.com/poliFcs/obama-­‐gives-­‐speech-­‐on-­‐ economy"/>   •  In  this  case,  your  employer’s  site  will  get  the  benefit.  but  your  site  won’t  get  punished.  (And   indeed,  if  you  use  the  author=rel  tag,  it  might  start  linking  the  two  sites,  and  giving  your  blog   more  authority  ...   hQp://www.wordtracker.com/academy/seo-­‐Fps-­‐ meda-­‐journalists    
  • USE  REL="AUTHOR".   This  is  great  for   you,  but  it's  also   great  for  your   bosses   hQp://www.wordtracker.com/academy/seo-­‐Fps-­‐ meda-­‐journalists    
  • WRITE  EVERYTHING  FOR  READER.  YES,  EVERYTHING.   •  Write  everything  as  though  it’ll  be  read  by  a  human,  not  a  computer.  In  fact,  write  everything   as  though  it  was  your  submission  for  a  Booker  prize.  I’m  talking  descripFve  Ftles  and  meta-­‐ tags,  punchy,  minimal  code,  and  URLs  with  snappy  headlines  in  them.   hQp://www.wordtracker.com/academy/seo-­‐Fps-­‐ meda-­‐journalists    
  • USEFUL  TIPS:   •  Add  descripFons  (“alt”  text)  to  your  images.  Search  engines  cannot  easily  process  images  to   get  text   •  When  possible,  detach  text  from  images  (i.e.  have  the  text  from  a  text-­‐heavy  infographics   piece  on  the  page  itself)   •  Do  the  same  with  Flash:  Add  informaFon  from  a  Flash  video  or  interacFve  to  the  body  of  the   HTML  page  itself.   •  SomeFmes,  it  might  be  a  good  idea  to  use  some  common  misspelled  words  and  typos  for  your   keywords,  along  with  correct  ones  (i.e.  “Barack  Obama”  and  “Barak  Obama”)   •  Ask  your  friends  and  colleagues  to  add  links  to  the  story  on  their  sites,  with  relevant  clickable   text  (“A  great  story  about  the  aborFon  rights  in  the  EU”).  Help  them  with  links  to  their  stories   as  well.  Links  on  social  networks  don’t  work  very  well  in  this  case.  Sorry.   hQp://reesenewslab.org/2013/03/06/quick-­‐and-­‐ dirty-­‐Fps-­‐on-­‐opFmizing-­‐your-­‐story-­‐for-­‐search-­‐ engines/45504/  
  • USE  A  TITLE  THAT  OTHER  PEOPLE  WOULD  SEARCH  FOR,   NOT  WHAT  SEEMS  COOL   Respect  the  readers.  
  • USE  GOOGLE  ADWORDS  TOOL  TO  RESEARCH  YOUR   KEYWORDS   Take  care  of  your  keyword  density  but   don’t  over-­‐opFmize.  
  • USE  GOOGLE  ADWORDS  TOOL  TO  RESEARCH  YOUR   KEYWORDS   Use  Google  auto-­‐suggest  feature  to   gauge  user  interest.  
  • TAKE  CARE  OF  HYGIENE  OF  THE  DESIGN   The  format  of  the  blog  /web  page  has  to  be  perfectly   synced.  Google  knows  everything.  Sees  everything.  
  • PUT  A  FULL,  UNABBREVIATED,  SUPER-­‐DETAILED  NAME  OF   THE  STORY  IN  THE  <TITLE>  FIELD   •  No  need  to  be  flashy  -­‐  Plain  informaFve-­‐ness  counts   Eg:  instead  of  the  main  headline  for  your  story  <Obama  Raises  STEM  Issues  Yet  Again>,   do  a  more  detailed  headline  using  more  nouns  <President  Barack  Obama  Talks  STEM   EducaFon  in  the  US  For  The  Third  Year  in  a  Row  in  His  State  of  the  Union  Address>.   •  Write  a  brief  summary  for  the  <descripFon>  field.  Try  to  do  it  manually  and   summarize  your  story  in  a  few  sentences;  copying  and  pasFng  your  first  couple  of   sentences  won’t  always  work,  especially  if  you  start  with  an  anecdote  for  the  story.   •  Think  of  a  dozen  or  so  nouns  that  relate  to  your  story.  Don't  use  too  many  or  too   few;  about  ten  will  just  work.  For  the  example  above,  my  keywords  should  be   something  like  <STEM,  math,  science,  technology,  engineering,  president,  US,   Barack  Obama,  State  of  the  Union,  educaFon>.  
  • PAY  ATTENTION  TO  TITLE  TAGS  AND  META  DESCRIPTIONS   •  Generally  speaking  (and  this  is  a  very  general  statement,  so  bear  with  me)  most  CMS   pla~orms  use  the  headline  of  the  story  as  the  Ftle  tag.   •  The  Ftle  tag  is  one  of  the  most  important  factors  when  opFmizing  your  pages,  so  be   as  literal  and  specific  as  you  can  be,  without  making  it  too  long.   •  The  guideline  for  Ftle  tags  is  about  70  characters  max,  so  use  your  meta  descripFon   tag  to  summarize  your  story.  Provide  the  who,  what,  where  and  why  as  concisely  as   you  can.  
  • BEHOLD  THE  POWER  OF  ANCHOR  TEXT   •  Linked  terms  on  your  stories  play  a  role  in  opFmizaFon.   •  So,  resist  the  urge  to  use  <Read  more>  or  <See  related  story>.   •  Use  keywords  from  your  headline  or  story.   •  B  specific  when  linking  to  other  pages  to  your  site.  
  • YOUR  URL  STRUCTURE  PLAYS  A  ROLE   •  Google  provides  technical  requirements  for  arFcles  to  be  considered  as  news  story.   •  But,  Google  also  considers  appending  a  porFon  of  your  Ftle  tag  or  headline.   •  Providing  keywords  in  the  URL  are  important  from  a  search  engine  and  usability   perspecFve.  
  • NOT  EVERY  ONE  IS  LOOKING  FOR  YOUR  NEWSPAPER  BRAND   •  Granted,  a  good  chunk  of  your  traffic  is  generated  from  your  newspaper  brand   •  We’ve  seen  up  to  80%  of  traffic  being  driven  by  branded  terms  alone.   •  What  about  those  long  tail  terms?   •  How  about  those  searches  for  a  person’s  name,  or  town  or  school?   •  Good  SEO  is  about  page  opFmizaFon,  you  don’t  need  to  drive  everyone  through   your  home  page  to  your  story.  
  • STUCK?  USE  KEYWORD  RESEARCH  TOOLS  TO  HELP  YOU   •  Not  sure  what  word  to  use?   •  Keyword  tools  available  to  help  you  idenFfy  how  popular  specific  keywords  are  and   get  suggested  alternaFves,  such  as  Googleís  AdWords  Keyword  Tool.   •  You  also  may  have  access  to  paid  services  like  WordTracker.com  or  Keyword   Discovery.com.   •  And,  if  you  want  to  spend  some  Fme  brainstorming  that  elusively  perfect  headline,   check  out  SEO  Smarty’s  post  -­‐  5  Tools  for  Keyword  Brainstorming.  
  • MAXIMIZE  YOUR  EVERGREEN  CONTENT   •  Special  secFons,  guides,  seasonal  content  -­‐  all  can  generate  ongoing  search  results   and  capture  new  audiences.   •  This  content  is  easily  sustainable,  and  because  the  content  does  not  expire,  the   longevity  of  the  pages  can  help  establish  authority  with  search  engines.   •  Relevant  evergreen  content  can  also  help  earn  search  traffic  with  inbound  links,  also   affecFng  the  search  result.  
  • PERSONALIZATION  IN  SEARCH  IMPACTS  THE  RESULT   •  A  search  result  in  Chennai  is  not  the  same  as  it  is  in  KolkaQa.  And  it  is  definitely  not   around  the  world.  Geography  maQers,  which  makes  local  news  important.  Other   personal  factors  impacFng  a  Google  result  include  the  following:   •  Google  personalized  home  page  content   •  Google  Reader  content  (RSS  feeds)   •  Google  Bookmarks   •  Search  history  (clicks)   •  Web  history  (sites  youíve  visited)   •  So  although  you  may  not  see  your  arFcle  about  a  local  superhero  acFon  figure   collecFon  come  up  in  your  search  query,  it  very  well  may  aQract  the  right  people.  
  • USE  UNIVERSAL  SEARCH  RESULTS  TO  YOUR  ADVANTAGE   •  Increasing  traffic  (and  therefore  ad  inventory)  is  paramount  for  most  newspaper   sites.   •  But  if  you  can  go  beyond  driving  traffic  solely  through  your  site,  you  can  make  the   most  of  Universal  Search  and  own  a  search  result  page  by  pushing  out  your  content.   •  Flickr,  YouTube,  Wikipedia,  TwiQer,  Facebook,  LinkedIn,  Delicious,  Digg,  Mixx,   StumbleUpon  ,  you  name  it  -­‐  all  can  come  up  a  search  result  for  your  content.   SO  OPTIMIZE  YOUR  ASSETS.  WELCOME  TO  SOCIAL  MEDIA  MARKETING  J  
  • DON’T  UNDERESTIMATE  THE  COMPETITION   •  When  a  person  conducts  a  search,  you  are  compeFng  against  nine  other  results  on   that  first  result  page.   •   Your  Ftle  tag  and  descripFon  are  your  first  impression  to  aQract  potenFal  audience.   •  You  can  capture  new  online  readership  by  se•ng  yourself  apart  with  useful  and   engaging  tags.   •  Quality,  relevant,  in-­‐depth  content  will  not  only  aQract  the  bots,  but  will  capture   new  audience  as  well.   BUT  ABOVE  ALL,  GOOD  WRITING  STILL  PREVAILS  
  • SUBMIT  IT  ON  TIME.  YOU  CAN’T  AFFORD  TO  BE  LATE.   Respect  deadlines.  Be  best  or  first  or  both.    
  • GOOGLE  IS  VERY  FAST…  TWITTER  IS  FASTER   Learn  how  to  be  there  
  • GET  CITED  AT  RELEVANT  WIKIPEDIA  ARTICLE  
  • ON  FACEBOOK  AND  TWITTER,  IT’S  ALL  ABOUT  AUTHORITY  
  • ON  FACEBOOK  AND  TWITTER,  IT’S  ALL  ABOUT  AUTHORITY   •  Have  all  the  relevant  links  on  your  profile   •  Follow  experts  of  related  subjects  on  TwiQer,  ask  them  to  review   your  work  and  provide  suggesFons   •  Find  news  related  to  your  research  paper,  share  on  your  blog  and   give  your  feedback   •  Share  the  same  on  Facebook  and  TwiQer   •  Be  interesFng  
  • DON’T  FEED  THE  TROLLS  
  • FEEDS  ARE  EVERYWHERE-­‐  G  PLUS,  FB,  TWITTER   How  do  they  subscribe  to  me?  
  • SEARCH-­‐SOCIAL  CONNECT  
  • SO,   CAN’T BE A
  • THE  PLACE  OF  TRUE  JOURNALISM  VS.  CITIZEN  JOURNALISM   Social  journalism  celebrates  the  noFon  of  authenFcity  over  speed,  collaboraFon  over  compeFFon.  The  news  reporter’s  primary   rival  today  is  not  another  reporter  but  the  searing  inFmacy  of  online  tesFmony  and  imagery.  We  must  make  our  peace  with   that.     ‘True  Journalism’  has  never  been  so  valuable.  We  sFll  need  the  Ernie  Pyles  on  the  scene,  taking  their  Fme  to  find  the  defining   detail.  But  we  also  need  a  new  category  of  reporter,  responsible  for  finding  the  hidden  signal  in  the  noise.  We  desperately  need   skilled  professionals  who  can  turn  isolated  units  of  social  content  into  compelling  stories,  who  can  shape  the  narraFve  emerging   out  of  the  cacophony  of  conversaFon  flowing  through  the  social  web.  Here’s  how  Jason  Fry  of  Poynter  put  it  this  week:     Besides  boots  on  the  ground,  news  organizaFons  also  need  an  eye  in  the  sky  —  someone  charged  with  gathering  informaFon,   deciding  what’s  credible  and  what’s  not,  and  presenFng  it  to  readers.     To  pracFce  ‘True  Journalism’  in  this  new  age  we  need  humility.  We  need  to  understand  we  no  longer  have  a  monopoly  over  the   words  or  images  that  define  a  story  like  Boston.  When  everybody  is  a  real-­‐Fme  witness,  that  is  the  most  foolish  assumpFon.     So  many  media  failures  this  past  week  were  driven  by  the  ‘scoop’  mentality,  a  dangerous  relic  of  the  past.       "First-­‐hand  witnesses  cannot  see  the  big  picture,"  says  Yves  Eudes,  a  reporter  with  French  broadsheet  Le  Monde.  "They're  not   trained  to  understand  whether  what  they're  seeing  is  relevant  to  the  big  picture  or  to  see  what  really  happens.  They're  trained   to  see  what  they  want  to  see.  If  you  only  rely  on  TwiQer  or  Facebook,  you  might  end  up  howling  with  the  wolves.”      -­‐  Mark  Li4le   hQp://blog.storyful.com/2013/04/21/when-­‐everyone-­‐is-­‐an-­‐eye-­‐witness-­‐what-­‐is-­‐a-­‐journalist/  
  • ALSO  CONSIDER  THE  OTHER  SIDE:   “You   forget   that   the   internet,   for   all   its   advantages,   is   a   distracFon:   you're   always   wondering   whether   what   you're  reading  by  others  matches  what   you're   witnessing   yourself.   If   you   don't   have   to   worry   about   that,   you   can   concentrate   on   pure   observaFonal   reporFng,  which  is  a  pleasure.”     -­‐   Peter  Beaumont,   Foreign  Affairs  Editor,  The  Guardian  
  • BUT  HEY!  
  • BUT  DO  TAKE  THIS  PRACTICAL  ADVICE:   hQp://wearethebest.wordpress.com/2007/01/26/12-­‐and-­‐a-­‐half-­‐rules-­‐to-­‐be-­‐a-­‐good-­‐ journalist/  
  • Part  2  of  2   THANK  YOU!   @OMLogic   @anomillie   www.omlogic.com   www.„.com/omlogic   www.omlogic.com/blog   Ready  to  Be  Social  the  Indian  way?     We  would  like  to  be  your  partner!