How to Set Up a Social Media Crisis Response Team - November 2013

392 views

Published on

A case study of WHNT News 19's crisis response during the April 27, 2011 tornado outbreak. Presented November 8, 2013 at #SoMeT13US in Huntsville, Alabama.

Published in: Social Media, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
392
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

How to Set Up a Social Media Crisis Response Team - November 2013

  1. 1. @lorimillerwhnt How to Set Up a Social Media Crisis Response Team --- A Case Study from the April 27, 2011 Alabama Tornado Outbreak Lori Miller | Sales Marketing and Research | WHNT News 19 November 8, 2013
  2. 2. Setting the Stage
  3. 3. @lorimillerwhnt
  4. 4. @lorimillerwhnt
  5. 5. @lorimillerwhnt http://www.norman.noaa.gov/2011/04/nssl-product-captures-april-27-tornado-outbreak-storm-rotation-tracks/
  6. 6. @lorimillerwhnt
  7. 7. The Outbreak April 27, 2011
  8. 8. @lorimillerwhnt 2013 Photo
  9. 9. @lorimillerwhnt
  10. 10. @lorimillerwhnt
  11. 11. “Normal” Disaster Response Warn the Staff / Assign Roles @lorimillerwhnt
  12. 12. “Normal” Disaster Response Volunteer Staffing Roles @lorimillerwhnt
  13. 13. “Normal” Disaster Response Meetings throughout the day @lorimillerwhnt
  14. 14. “Normal” Disaster Response Helping from Home 2013 Photo @lorimillerwhnt
  15. 15. … and then we reached a tipping point
  16. 16. @lorimillerwhnt Lost 90+ high-voltage transmission towers
  17. 17. @lorimillerwhnt Substations mangled Browns Ferry shut down
  18. 18. @lorimillerwhnt
  19. 19. @lorimillerwhnt
  20. 20. @lorimillerwhnt
  21. 21. @lorimillerwhnt
  22. 22. @lorimillerwhnt
  23. 23. @lorimillerwhnt INITIAL IMPACTS – EARLY PART OF THE DAY  Started out with a plan for a potentially violent day  Lost power around 1:30 or 2pm – and that’s when things started to change  Only “critical” areas were wired to the generator – no one knew which outlets could be used and only a dozen computers worked  Inboxes quickly began to get overloaded with information – prioritized storm tracks  Fatigue – and some reporters were trapped in their neighborhoods Planning for Uncertainty
  24. 24. @lorimillerwhnt
  25. 25. @lorimillerwhnt WHNT Coverage area
  26. 26. @lorimillerwhnt 80+% Estimate of those without power
  27. 27. @lorimillerwhnt
  28. 28. @lorimillerwhnt
  29. 29. The Next Day
  30. 30. @lorimillerwhnt IMPACTS – ON OPERATIONS  Employees exhausted and emotionally depleted  Couldn’t find all our employees – and some were still unable to come in  Still on generator -- Services and systems down, limited number of computers  No gas, no cash  Resource-draining coverage requirements – from Mississippi to Georgia Planning for Uncertainty
  31. 31. @lorimillerwhnt
  32. 32. @lorimillerwhnt
  33. 33. @lorimillerwhnt
  34. 34. @lorimillerwhnt
  35. 35. @lorimillerwhnt
  36. 36. @lorimillerwhnt IMPACTS -- ON INFORMATION FLOW  Internal misinformation (thought we needed air cards, thought all printers were down, ‘imminent’ email server crash suspected)  Email overload – no volunteer procedures for deleting once received  Multiple web volunteers meant info was overwritten, not saved – in initial hours  Posting on Facebook like a live blog – added admins – all had different posting strategies Planning for Uncertainty
  37. 37. @lorimillerwhnt IMPACTS -- ON VOLUNTEERS  Limited knowledge of News department systems  Overwhelmed by raw data – and no good method to share it internally  Expended too much energy finding the same information  Inadequate briefings at shift changes the first day  No loop between volunteers and News teams (deployment of crews) and engineers (status of systems) – at first Planning for Uncertainty
  38. 38. @lorimillerwhnt Volunteers News 2013 photo Close but, operationally, so far away…
  39. 39. The Changes
  40. 40. @lorimillerwhnt Sit together + team lead for every shift
  41. 41. @lorimillerwhnt Old school data capture
  42. 42. @lorimillerwhnt
  43. 43. Social Media Uses
  44. 44. @lorimillerwhnt FACEBOOOK on April 26 • 32,788 Fans • 1,107 likes and comments • 613,032 Newsfeed impressions FACEBOOK on April 27 • 37,879 fans • 6,894 likes and comments • 3.6 Million Newsfeed impressions
  45. 45. @lorimillerwhnt Twitter on April 26 • 33 tweets Twitter on April 27 • 398 tweets • Autofed from Facebook
  46. 46. @lorimillerwhnt On April 28, we were at times averaging a post every 3-5 minutes
  47. 47. @lorimillerwhnt By April 29, it sometimes paced every 1-2 minutes
  48. 48. @lorimillerwhnt … or faster
  49. 49. @lorimillerwhnt Divide social actions: transcription, posts, comments
  50. 50. The Week Continues (with a second tipping point)
  51. 51. @lorimillerwhnt
  52. 52. @lorimillerwhnt
  53. 53. @lorimillerwhnt
  54. 54. @lorimillerwhnt CONTINUING IMPACT -- ON OPERATIONS  Work schedules and systems began to return to “normal” breaking news protocols -- Non-news volunteers replaced by sister station personnel  Communications team finally able to focus on fundraising event planning  No commercials, no revenue – and billing was potentially problematic  Diesel consumption at the transmitter tower  Exhaustion – and errors  Overloaded outlets and “coiled” extension cords Planning for Uncertainty
  55. 55. @lorimillerwhnt
  56. 56. @lorimillerwhnt
  57. 57. @lorimillerwhnt SOCIAL MEDIA PROBLEMS  Anger about real or perceived lack of coverage  Rumors  Fundraising sites posted to our wall – legitimate? Planning for Uncertainty
  58. 58. What We Learned
  59. 59. @lorimillerwhnt WHAT DIDN’T WORK  We mostly ignored Twitter – and that was okay with us THEN…  We inundated Facebook with posts in 2011 for storm tracking – new algorithms mean that wouldn’t work now  We grabbed evaluation and benchmarking metrics as we thought about it – which wasn’t a lot  We didn’t update our policies fast enough Planning for Uncertainty
  60. 60. @lorimillerwhnt WHAT WORKED  Using joint information centers – in the metro, EMAs/police/mayor’s office – all reported together  Getting help from your partners  Embracing Facebook and getting it done  Taking notes about what worked – while it was still fresh  Sharing our experiences with sister stations Planning for Uncertainty
  61. 61. @lorimillerwhnt TIPS TO SHARE  Specific roles – no ambiguous “helping”  Step-by-step instructions for common tasks  Training for working from home or offsite  Go-kit of handy items – like extension cords and power strips  Discussions about email limits and scheduled Facebook posts Planning for Uncertainty
  62. 62. @lorimillerwhnt TIPS TO SHARE  Templates for organization – word templates for the INTERNAL team, web templates for EXTERNAL audience  Volunteer team leads  Facebook – Shorter posts, subheads for easy scanning, respond with first names, “I don’t know” is an answer  Volunteers close together – liaise between functional groups (Chatzy)  Repetitive info on clipboards (no scribbled notes) Planning for Uncertainty
  63. 63. @lorimillerwhnt TIPS TO SHARE  Choose important evaluation metrics now – so you don’t have to think about it  Use the cloud  Plan backups for your backups – and maintenance schedules for them  Test and practice (technophobe employees are test beds!)  Ask for help – know who your partners are Planning for Uncertainty
  64. 64. NO EXCUSES Not in my job description No one’s asked me No one will let me I can’t get it approved I don’t have time I don’t have the experience
  65. 65. a PARTIAL UNAPPROVED plan is STILL BETTER than no plan at all.
  66. 66. Thank you Lori Miller Sales Marketing and Research Manager| WHNT News 19 lori.miller@whnt.com @lorimillerwhnt linkedin/in/blorimiller

×