Tuesday, May 13, 2014
Radford University
The Inaugural Innovative
Library Classroom Event
See the detailed schedule for full program descriptions. Tweet with us: #tilc2014
Timeslot Young 302 Young 305 Young 311
9...
With many thanks to the individuals, organizations, and
institutions that made today possible
 McConnell Library at Radfo...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
8:15-9:00 am
Registration and continental breakfast
Young Hall, fi...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
from Ferrum College’s library instructional program will be includ...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
11:00-11:45 am
Invited Speaker: Courageous conversations worth hav...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
Standards, and describe my experiences facilitating these student-...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
advanced users. Libraries are uniquely suited to helping these nov...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
Let the distance bring us together: Using concept-based videos
Jon...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
Libraries, was offered an opportunity to assist the Medical Labora...
The Innovative Library Classroom
Thursday, May 13, 2014
and academic processes. Participants will engage with one of these...
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The Innovative Library Conference 2014 Final Program

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Final program for the Innovative Library Conference 2014, taking place on May 13, 2014 in Radford, VA.

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The Innovative Library Conference 2014 Final Program

  1. 1. Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Radford University The Inaugural Innovative Library Classroom Event
  2. 2. See the detailed schedule for full program descriptions. Tweet with us: #tilc2014 Timeslot Young 302 Young 305 Young 311 9:00-10:00 a.m. Keynote: Lori Anthony, Radford University Using the design thinking process to address today’s unique educational challenges X X 10:00-10:45 a.m. Brandi Porter, Ferrum College Using threshold concepts, learning theory, and millennial research in the design of information literacy sessions Katelyn Tucker, Radford University Assessing the sexy Ingrid Ruffin, University of Tennessee-Knoxville UT Libraries’ take out: Meeting patrons where they are and where they live 11:00-11:45 a.m. Invited speaker: Carroll Wilkerson, West Virginia University Courageous conversations worth having (to strengthen instructional practice) Kathy Shields, High Point University Online info lit modules and English composition: An experiment in hybrid pedagogy Lauren Wallis, University of Montevallo Selfies in the stacks: Library instruction with Instagram 12:00- 1:15 p.m. LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH 1:30-2:15 p.m. Jenne Klotz and Kathy Clarke, James Madison University Beyond the gold: Redesigning a successful information literacy tutorial for a large first-year class Lynda Kellam, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Don’t fear the data: Statistical literacy and information literacy instruction Virginia Pannabecker, Arizona State University Fad diets and evidence-based research: 3 mini case studies in student-driven how-to research 2:30-3:15 p.m. Candice Benjes-Small, Radford University, and Rebecca K. Miller, Virginia Tech Reframing the Standards: A call for a new approach to defining proficiencies for instruction librarians Jonathan McMichael, Julia Feerrar, and Amanda McDonald, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill Let the distance bring us together: Using concept-based videos Jenny Dale and Amy Harris Houk, University of North Carolina- Greensboro License to drive: Using Google Drive 3:30-4:30 p.m. Lightning Talks X X Schedule at a Glance The Innovative Library Classroom May 13, 2014 Radford University Radford, Virginia
  3. 3. With many thanks to the individuals, organizations, and institutions that made today possible  McConnell Library at Radford University  Wyndham Robertson Library at Hollins University  Virginia Tech University Libraries The Innovative Library Conference 2104 Steering Committee: Candice Benjes-Small, Radford University Rebecca K. Miller, Virginia Tech Alyssa Archer, Radford University Craig Arthur, Radford University Maryke Barber, Hollins University Kiri Goldbeck DeBose, Virginia Tech Elizabeth Kocevar-Weidinger Tatiana Pashkova-Balkenhol, Longwood University Lauren Pressley, Virginia Tech Rebecca Seipp, Hollins University Jennifer Whicker, Radford University
  4. 4. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 8:15-9:00 am Registration and continental breakfast Young Hall, first floor Registration will remain open until 9:30. If you arrive after 9:30, there will be instructions for you at the registration table. 9:00-10:00 am Keynote Address: Using the design thinking process to address today’s unique educational challenges Lori Anthony, Radford University Young 302 This is an era of change and innovation. While librarians want to engage in addressing current, relevant and “wicked” problems, library educators have the additional challenges of staying ahead of technology, navigating new modes of instructional delivery, and keeping pedagogically current. New challenges require unique strategies to stay ahead of the curve. Design Thinking is such an approach. The power of the Design Thinking mindset is that it engages multiple stakeholders, fosters empathy, facilitates ideation without the fear of failure, tests ideas through prototyping and continues through to implementation. During this session you will learn about the Design Thinking process, develop strategies to address problems directly related to you and be empowered to take the necessary steps to facilitate Design Thinking at your library. 10:00-10:45 am Using threshold concepts, learning theory, and millennial research in the design of information literacy sessions Brandi Porter, Ferrum College Young 302 This session will discuss Ferrum College’s approach toward developing and delivering varied one-shot information literacy instruction sessions based on the author’s personal research of millennial students’ information retrieval practices and on literature in the field regarding threshold concepts and teaching and learning theories. Mapping of millennial search strategies to institution specific information literacy threshold concepts and instructional approaches will be illustrated. Three specific examples
  5. 5. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 from Ferrum College’s library instructional program will be included: a freshman seminar flipped instruction approach, an upper division problem-based model, and an active learning session using the Library’s online discovery system. Further, how these sessions connect with literature on how students learn will be presented. The session will highlight how individual academic libraries can incorporate this model into lesson plans and instruction programs at their own institution. A group exercise will be incorporated that includes the author’s handout for mapping a similar practice locally. Assessing the sexy Katelyn Tucker, Radford University Young 305 Flipped and gamified classes are making waves in information literacy instruction, but how do we know if these new, flashy, sexy methods actually work? Librarians at Radford University have been flipping and using games in one-shot instruction sessions for the past year. In this session, participants will hear how librarians assessed completed annotated bibliographies from four sections of the same course with identical assignments. By analyzing student work, librarians were able to see if students met the requirements of learning outcomes such as creating and utilizing focused search strategies, locating appropriate sources, and providing proper attribution. UT Libraries’ take out: Meeting patrons where they are and where they live Ingrid Ruffin, University of Tennessee-Knoxville Young 311 University libraries are popular places for students to study and socialize. Even though many students avail themselves of the research services more could definitely benefit from increased interaction with librarians as well. During Fall 2013 a new student engagement program was piloted at the University of Tennessee Knoxville called “Library Take Out”. Through this program librarians work with resident assistants (RAs) and Hall Directors (HDs) to provide fun and engaging instructional programming for hall residents. Presentation participants will: - Find out about early outcomes and outlooks for the future of UT Libraries Take Out including successes, setbacks, and failures. - Identify potential partners for developing their own program. - Using discussion, brainstorming, and mapping begin to design their own engagement program
  6. 6. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 11:00-11:45 am Invited Speaker: Courageous conversations worth having (to strengthen instructional practice) Carroll Wilkerson, West Virginia University Young 302 This presentation will define a courageous conversation as “a dialogue that is designed to resolve competing priorities and beliefs while preserving relationships” (Heifetz et al 2009, The Practice of Adaptive Leadership, 304.) It’s a verbal exchange that you initiate with a co-worker, boss, personal friend or family member. In a workplace situation, the person starting the conversation speaks with honesty and authenticity to address issues of concern in the shared work also speak in a candid manner. The session will offer topic suggestions for courageous conversations and raise questions about how the practice of courageous conversations can help strengthen classroom instruction and fortify working relationships with other teaching librarians. There will be time for audience questions and practice framing some conversation topics we would like to have in the future. Online info lit modules and English composition: An experiment in hybrid pedagogy Kathy Shields, High Point University Young 305 In Spring 2012, instruction librarians from the HPU Libraries partnered with English composition faculty to study students' research habits. One component of this study was a series of online information literacy modules, created by the librarians and embedded in Blackboard, that addressed several of the learning outcomes for English composition. Using writing samples from the beginning of the semester and the end, we looked at sections that had the modules, as well as those that didn't, to determine if there was any noticeable effect on students' research habits. From what we learned, we revamped our instruction sessions for English composition for Fall 2013, as well as the course guide for these classes. In this presentation, we will discuss what we learned from the original research study, how weapplied that information to the creation of new materials and assessment, and our experience working with these courses again in Spring 2014. Selfies in the stacks: Library instruction with Instagram Lauren Wallis, Young 311 Today’s college students love taking pictures of themselves--even in the library! Information literacy instruction with Instagram gets students out of the traditional library classroom, engaging them through active learning techniques and a fun, familiar social media platform. This presentation will cover designing, facilitating, and assessing Instagram activities for library instruction. I will address the nuts and bolts of planning Instagram activities, discuss how this type of instruction engages the ACRL
  7. 7. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 Standards, and describe my experiences facilitating these student-led sessions. Participants will engage in an Instagram activity similar to one I have used with students. After the activity we will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of instruction with Instagram and identify ways it could be successful at a variety of institutions. Attendees will come away from the session with concrete ideas and tools for using Instagram and related social media platforms in a variety of library instruction settings. 12:00-1:15 pm Lunch Young Lobby During lunch, we will have a small number of “affinity tables” for people interested in discussing a particular instruction topic or issue. 1:30-2:15 pm Beyond the gold: Redesigning a successful information literacy tutorial for a large first-year class Jenne Klotz and Kathy Clarke, James Madison University Young 302 James Madison University Libraries has a long successful history of collaboration with General Education to integrate information literacy skills into the curriculum. Starting with a library skills workbook in the mid-1980s, the library built a robust instruction program based on an asynchronous experience in the first year followed by expert instruction in the majors in the upper level courses. The online program, Go for the Gold, and its related assessment test, the Information Seeking Skills Test, contributed to the JMU information literacy program receiving “best practice” designation. In 2011 the Library Instruction unit began to rethink and redesign the first-year intervention. After 2 years the Madison Research Essentials online course module and Madison Research Essentials Skills Test (M- REST) were launched. Residing in the Learning Management System, Madison Research Essentials is an interactive video based course. The M-REST is the related high-stakes assessment. Don’t fear the data: Statistical literacy and information literacy instruction Lynda Kellam, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Young 305 In recent years, academic librarians have taken tremendous strides supporting researchers in managing and collecting numeric datasets. At the same time, however, there is a need for libraries to support less-
  8. 8. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 advanced users. Libraries are uniquely suited to helping these novice researchers discover, access, and evaluate ready-made statistics, just as we help them discover, access, and evaluate other types of information. No longer solely the purview of subject specialists and data librarians, this support can be mainstreamed into wider reference and instruction activities. By doing so, we can expand the library’s role supporting university-wide initiatives for increasing information literacy and improving critical thinking skills to include support for statistical literacy. In this interactive presentation we will discuss ways that instruction librarians can more directly address numeric information in library instruction sessions and create engaging (and maybe even entertaining) activities for classroom integration. Fad diets and evidence-based research: 3 mini case studies in student-driven how-to research Virginia Pannabecker, Arizona State University Young 311 As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common. Having mastered brief 'hands-on' activities to practice skills learned, I was ready to branch out, and so were some faculty with whom I work, especially in the fields of Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness. For Spring 2013 I am working with 3 faculty to try a pre-class assignment followed by a participatory hands-on, student reporting (flipped) class session on: 1) finding the source of research reported in health news articles, 2) identifying high level EBP research studies on a nutrition topic, and 3) exploring career and research tools in Kinesiology. This session will include a brief overview of each case study with participatory opportunities for all. 2:30-3:15 pm Reframing the Standards: A call for a new approach to defining proficiencies for instruction librarians Candice Benjes-Small, Radford University and Rebecca K. Miller, Virginia Tech Young 302 What does it mean to be an “instruction librarian”? Yes, it involves teaching students information literacy skills, but so much else happens before, during, and after such sessions. The current ACRL Standards For Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators provides a list of 12 categories containing 41 proficiencies (with additional ones for coordinators). While valuable, we argue this organization fails to capture the true expectations of our position. Being an instruction librarian requires one to wear many hats: in addition to educators and instructional designers, we need to be advocates, marketers, teaching partners, and project managers- just to name a few. We propose that we borrow from the teaching frameworks used in Europe and Australia which arrange competencies by domains based not on categories, but on roles. By emphasizing the different roles we must play, this new framework would provide a more holistic and accurate view of “instruction.”
  9. 9. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 Let the distance bring us together: Using concept-based videos Jonathan McMichael, Julia Feerrar, and Amanda McDonald, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Young 305 Recent changes to the First Year Writing requirements and curriculum have presented R.B. House Undergraduate Library (UL) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a familiar higher education logistical and pedagogical dilemma: how do you maintain the levels of personalization necessary for successful learning environments in a model that is scalable to an increasing student body? With this in mind, we began a project in the fall of 2013 to reimagine our online tutorials as a set of learning objects complementary to our classroom instruction. Literature on flipped classroom principles and performance-based learning served as a roadmap while planning, developing, implementing, and assessing these tutorials. The goal of this session is to show participants how the use of concept-based tutorials with complementary classroom practices is a viable approach to creating a 21st century learning environment. License to drive: Using Google Drive Jenny Dale and Amy Harris Houk, University of North Carolina-Greensboro Young 311 In this presentation, we will share our experiences with using Google Drive and its tools in the library classroom. We have used Google Forms to collect student learning assessment data for several years, and have recently experimented with using Google Docs to replace print worksheets in several information literacy sessions. We will provide examples of Docs and Forms that we have used and will ask participants to share their own experiences and brainstorm new ways to use these tools in the library classroom. In keeping with our theme, we will share several of our own examples and will also create and share a new Doc to capture the ideas that come out of the session. Participants can expect to leave with practical ideas for using Google Drive in their information literacy programs, whether they use these tools to encourage collaborative learning, collect assessment data, or try something else entirely. 3:30-4:30 pm Lightning Talks Young 302 Cross-campus collaboration to produce Camtasia®-enhanced lessons to improve distance learning Carole Porter and Laura Link, Jefferson College of Health Sciences More and more programs of study are being offered as distance learning opportunities. This puts libraries in an unique position to support their institution’s departmental needs to find better ways to present material in an online learning environment. This is especially true for health science colleges whose programs rely heavily on clinical instruction and hands-on experiences. In Spring 2013, Jefferson College of Health Sciences (JCHS) Library, a branch of the Carilion Clinic Health Sciences
  10. 10. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 Libraries, was offered an opportunity to assist the Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) program in designing a Camtasia®-enhanced lesson to supplement the Phlebotomy lecture portion of students’ distance education. The JCHS Library provided the technical expertise necessary to produce and upload the finished Camtasia® video project. Information gathered in a pilot study showed that the use of Camtasia®-enhanced lessons could improve students’ understanding of techniques used in successful Phlebotomy procedures. This successful collaborative project has served to not only further solidify the JCHS Library’s relationship with another department, but also to provide an avenue in which to reach out and offer similar support services to other College departments. Minute to learn it: Integrating one-minute videos in information literacy planning Rachel Lux and Lucinda Rush, Old Dominion University As the prevalence of visual literacy in college-level assignments grows and students’ attention spans continue to shrink, we continually look for instructional tools that engage millennials. Old Dominion University Libraries developed a series of One Minute Tip videos that deliver 60 seconds of instruction—adaptable to many formats (shown in traditional library instruction classes; incorporated in distance learning information literacy sessions; shared via social media platforms; viewed individually, etc.). By mixing pop culture references, sound effects and images with screen shots, pop- up text, screencasts and more, the videos go a step beyond telling students about the services we offer by showing quick tips for using tools such as the Discovery Service and Subject Guides and understanding concepts including the Filter Bubble and finding reliable sources. Our Lightning Talk focuses on content selection, writing instructional scripts, branding—and what we learned along the way. The retweet of academia: Using Twitter to improve information literacy instruction Alexander Carroll and Robin Dasler, University of Maryland-College Park Previous educational literature contends that undergraduate students need more basic instruction on citation and plagiarism. Meanwhile, citation management systems such as EndNote Web, Zotero, and Mendeley are becoming increasingly robust and sophisticated. As a result, libraries have begun to create systematic support for integrating these software applications into their service offerings. The confluence of these two trends suggests an opportunity for libraries to shift the emphasis of their citation instruction. Rather than focusing on specific mechanics of citation styles, libraries can emphasize instruction on the topics of plagiarism and citation more broadly. Librarians should use this opportunity to develop new instructional models and pedagogical methods for delivering citation and plagiarism instruction that have relevance for students today. By using Twitter to depict citations and bibliographies as the “Retweet of Academia,” librarians can offer classic bibliographic instruction in an innovative and exciting way. Creating a colorful classroom: Bringing visual media and graphics into the information literacy session Liz Johns, Virginia Commonwealth University Tired of your own text-based presentations and activities when teaching students basic information literacy and research skills? Visual media and graphics can quickly and easily capture the attention of your students in ways that you cannot always do on your own, and help students learn skills in a more dynamic way. Traditional Venn Diagrams, text-based PowerPoint presentations and database walk- throughs can be integral to teaching research skills, but as educators learn more about how people learn, we know that these tactics don’t capture everyone. This presentation will cover various ways in which instructors can use visuals to engage students and apply research skills. Examples provide new ways for teaching skills such as keyword creation, evaluative criteria, and understanding various library
  11. 11. The Innovative Library Classroom Thursday, May 13, 2014 and academic processes. Participants will engage with one of these examples during the talk, and see how easy they can be to integrate into even the shortest information literacy session. How to (and how not to) engage your students with popular culture Craig Arthur, Radford University Are you tired of those exceedingly disinterested expressions on students’ faces as you start your instruction sessions? Integrating popular culture motifs, social media trends, and memes in your classes encourages students to engage from the start.You do not have to be a popular culture boss to pull this off. I will cover how and where to spot the next social media craze. The importance of understanding the interests of the students we instruct when it comes time to pick a theme will be addressed. What happens when your popular cultural references no longer have the cache they did just a few months ago? Don’t worry, it happens and we will talk about it. Whether it is Bitstrips, Hadoukening, Kimye, or cartoon character trash talk, incorporating popular culture motifs, social media trends, and memes into your instruction sessions can help you meet your students where they are.

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