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Email is a daily part of our lives. Learn how to write effective emails that get responded to and the results that you desire.

Email is a daily part of our lives. Learn how to write effective emails that get responded to and the results that you desire.

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Effective Email Presentation 102109 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Effective Email Making sure your messages get read and acted upon
  • 2.
    • Program & Portfolio Management $1295
      • 2 Days / 16 PDU’s - New Brunswick October 29-30, 2009
    • PMP Exam Cram Boot Camp $2595
      • 3 days / 35 PDU’s – New Brunswick October 19-21, 2009
    • Core Project Management $1095
      • 3 Day / 21 PDU’s – New Brunswick October 28-30, 2009
    Please contact SSI at 877.390.3057 for more information. To register: contact Karen Kowalski 973.473.2490
  • 3.
    • Myles D. Miller MBA, MCSE, PMP
    • Myles has over 20 years experience in the project management field, across multiple industries including retail, defense, state and federal government and most recently hospitality. During his varied career, he has led projects ranging in budgetary size from $100K to $500M. His team leadership has impacted national and international companies and governments.
  • 4. Effective Email – Topic Agenda
    • Introduction
    • Subject Lines are Headlines
    • Make One Point per Email
    • Specify the Response You Want
    • Using EOM Headlines
    • Be a Good Correspondent
    • Internal Email
  • 5. INTRODUCTION
    • Do people respond to your emails in the way you want them too?
    • Do they seem to ignore them?
    • Do they miss important information?
    • Are you sure that you're making the best possible impression with your emails?
  • 6. INTRODUCTION
    • When you compose an email message…
      • There are some simple rules that will help you
      • ensure that your emails are:
          • Read the first time
          • Make a positive impression
          • Get you the response you want
    • That’s what we are going to learn today!!!
  • 7. Subject Lines are Headlines
    • A newspaper headline has two functions:
      • Grabs your attention
      • It tells you what the article is about, so you can decide whether you want to read further.
    • Email subject lines need to do exactly the same thing!
    • Use a few well-chosen words, so that the recipient knows at a glance exactly what the email is about.
  • 8.
    • TIPS…
      • If your message is one of a regular series of emails, such as a weekly project report, include the date in the subject line.
      • For a message that needs a response, you might want to include a call to action, such as "Please reply by November 7".
    Subject Lines are Headlines
  • 9.
    • TIPS…
    • Remember that everyone tries to reduce the amount of "spam" email messages they receive.
    • If you make appropriate use of the subject line, you increase the chances that your email will be read rather than mistaken for spam and deleted without so much as a glance.
    • Just as it would be ridiculous to publish a newspaper without headlines, never leave the subject line blank. Emails with blank subject lines are usually spam!
    Subject Lines are Headlines
  • 10.
    • Subject: Meeting
    • Hi Jim,
    • I just wanted to remind you about the meeting we have scheduled next week. Do let me know if you have any questions!
    • Best wishes,
    • Mark
    Examples – First a bad one…
  • 11.
    • Subject: Meeting
    • Hi Jim,
    • I just wanted to remind you about the meeting we have scheduled next week.
    • Do let me know if you have any questions!
    • Best wishes,
    • Mark
    • This email is an example of poor communication in several ways. Let's focus on the headline…
      • As you can see, it's titled "Meeting“
    Examples – First a bad one…
  • 12.
    • Why is it a bad headline?
      • Well, there's no information about the meeting. If your calendar is full of meetings, you might even wonder which one Mark is talking about.
      • There's certainly no clarity about the subject, or when and where the meeting's being held.
      • What's more, the lack of specific information makes it look like a spam email. This email risks being deleted without being read!
      • Also, the tone of the message is that of a friendly reminder. There's nothing wrong with that, but the essential details are missing. If Jim hasn't heard anything about the meeting, or has completely forgotten, he'll have to write back for more information.
    Examples – First a bad one…
  • 13.
    • Subject: Reminder For 10am Meeting Sched. 10/05 on PASS Process.
    • Hi Jim,
    • I just wanted to remind you about the meeting we have scheduled for Monday, October 5, at 10:00 AM.
    • It's being held in conference room A, and we'll be discussing the new PASS Process.
    • If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch (x3024).
    • Best Wishes,
    • Mark
    Examples – Now a good one…
  • 14.
    • What’s different…
      • Well, certainly the headline –
      • Subject: Reminder For 10am Meeting Sched. 10/05 on PASS Process.
    • The great thing about this headline is that the reader doesn't even have to open the email to get most of the relevant information.
    • And the precise nature of the headline serves as a useful prompt. Every time the reader glances at his saved emails, he'll be reminded about that specific meeting.
    Examples – Now a good one…
  • 15.
    • One of the advantage email has compared with traditional letters is that it doesn't cost any more to send several emails than it does to send one.
    • So, if you need to communicate with someone about various matters, consider writing a separate email on each subject.
    Make One Point per Email
  • 16.
    • Why do one email per topic…
      • Your correspondent can reply to each one individually and in the appropriate time frame
      • Only requires a short reply that he or she can send straight away, before deleting it
      • Another topic might require more research
      • By writing separate messages, you should get clearer answers, while helping other people manage their inboxes better.
    Make One Point per Email
  • 17.
    • What if you want to have more than one point in your emails…
      • Consider presenting each point in a separate, numbered paragraph.
      • This makes each point stand out, significantly increasing the likelihood that each point will be addressed.
    Make One Point per Email
  • 18.
    • Some additional thoughts…
      • As with traditional business letters, each individual email should be clear and concise
      • The purpose of the message should be detailed in the very first paragraph.
      • Sentences should be kept short and to the point.
      • The body of the email should contain all pertinent information and should be direct and informative.
    Make One Point per Email
  • 19.
    • Subject: Revisions For Sales Report
    • Hi Jackie,
    • Thanks for sending in that report last week. I read through it yesterday and feel that you need more specific information regarding our sales figures in Chapter 2. I also felt that the tone could be a bit more formal. The report is going to be read by our Executive Team, and needs to reflect our professionalism.
    • Also, I wanted to let you know that I've scheduled a meeting with the PR department for this Friday, regarding the new ad campaign. It's at 11:00, and will be in the small conference room. Please let me know if you can make that time.
    • Thanks!
    • Monica
    Examples – Here’s another bad one…
  • 20.
    • Monica got a good headline in there, and she was pretty clear on the changes she wanted made to that report.
    • Subject: Revisions For Sales Report
    • Thanks for sending in that report last week. I read through it yesterday and feel that you need more specific information regarding our sales figures in Chapter 2. I also felt that the tone could be a bit more formal. The report is going to be read by our Executive Team, and needs to reflect our professionalism.
    • But what did she do wrong?
    Examples – Here’s another bad one…
  • 21. Examples – Here’s another bad one…
    • Well, that second paragraph about the meeting is pretty important, and yet she lumped it into the email that detailed the revisions.
    • Also, I wanted to let you know that I've scheduled a meeting with the PR department for this Friday, regarding the new ad campaign. It's at 11:00, and will be in the small conference room. Please let me know if you can make that time.
    • If Jackie doesn't put it straight in her calendar, she'll have to remember that the meeting details were in the email titled "Revisions For Sales Report", which is not very logical. Combining those two important communications increases the chance that either the meeting or the revisions are going to be forgotten.
  • 22.
    • Subject: Revisions For Sales Report
    • Hi Jackie,
    • Thanks for sending in that report last week. I read through it yesterday and feel that you need more specific information regarding our sales figures in Chapter 2. I also felt that the tone could be a bit more formal. The report is going to be read by our Executive Team, and needs to reflect our professionalism.
    • Thanks for your hard work on this!
    • Monica
    Examples – Time for the good one… Subject: Friday 10/9, 11am Meeting w/PR Dept Hi Jackie, I wanted to let you know that I've scheduled a meeting with the PR department for this Friday, 10/9, regarding the new ad campaign. It's at 11:00am, and will be in the small conference room. Please let me know if you can make that time. Thanks! Monica
  • 23.
    • By separating those two important communications, Jackie will be able to find what she needs quickly in her inbox.
    • In addition, separating the two topics actually helps her keep her saved emails relevant.
    • Once she's done with the revisions email she can delete it, but keep the meeting reminder email until the end of the week.
    Examples – Time for the good one…
  • 24.
    • Some thoughts to consider…
      • Make sure to include any call to action you desire, such as a phone call or follow-up appointment.
      • Make sure you include your contact information, including your name, title, and phone numbers. Do this even with internal messages.
      • Remember, the easier you make it for someone else to respond, the more likely they are to do so!
    Specify the Response You Want
  • 25.
    • From: [email_address]
    • Subject: Proposal
    • Lynn,
    • Did you get my proposal last week? I haven't heard back and wanted to make sure.
    • Can you please call me so we can discuss?
    • Thanks!
    • Peter
    Here’s another bad example…
  • 26.
    • What’s wrong with this?
    • There are several pieces of important information missing from this email.
      • The first thing that's missing is information about the proposal. What if Lynn got several proposals? Which one is the writer talking about? Also, did he send it by post, or through email?
      • Also, the writer gave Lynn no information on how to get in touch. Where is his office number, his cell number, or his business name? Lynn will have to go and find that information.
      • And, most critically, he didn't give his full name and title at the bottom of the mail – despite the fact that his name doesn't form part of his email address
    Specify the Response You Want
  • 27.
    • Subject: Checking On Reliable Landscapes Proposal
    • Dear Lynn,
    • I just wanted to check to make sure you received the landscaping proposal I emailed to you last week. I haven't heard back and wanted to make sure it went through.
    • Can you please call me by Thursday so we can discuss? This is when our discount offer expires, and I want to make sure you don't miss it!
    • The quickest way to contact me is by cell phone.
    • Thanks!
    • Peter Schuell, Owner Reliable Landscaping, Inc. 555.135.4598 (office) 555.135.2929 (cell)
    Let’s look at a good example…
  • 28.
    • What’s different?
    • Peter has now given Lynn all the information she needs:
      • She knows he emailed the proposal last week,
      • He would like her to call him by Thursday
      • She should use his cell phone to make contact quickly.
    • Most importantly, Peter included his name and title, so Lynn knows who he is, and put his contact information at the bottom.
    Specify the Response You Want
  • 29.
    • Give this a try…
    • When you have a very short message to convey, you can use the EOM, or “End Of Message” technique.
    • This is possible when you can put all the relevant information in the subject line, followed by the letters "EOM".
    • This lets the recipient know that they don't even have to open the email; all the information is right there. The subject line is the message.
    Using EOM Headlines
  • 30.
    • Subject: 10/5 Meeting, 10am, Conf. Rm. A, On PASS Procedure EOM
    • It’s just that easy.
    Here’s an example…
  • 31.
    • Make sure that you go through your inbox regularly and respond as appropriate. This is a simple act of courtesy and will also serve to encourage others to reply to your emails in a timely manner.
    • If a detailed response is required to an email, and you don't have the time to pull together the information straight away, send a holding reply saying that you have received the message, and indicating when you will respond fully.
    Be a good correspondent
  • 32.
    • How frequently you should check your mail will depend on the nature of your work, but try to avoid interrupting a task you're working on to check your mail simply because you wonder if something interesting has come in.
    • Always set your Out of Office agent when you're going to be away from your email for a day or more, whether on leave or because you're at meetings.
    Be a good correspondent
  • 33.
    • Some more good advice
    • Internal emails, just like other emails, should not be too informal.
    • Remember, these are written forms of communication that can be printed out and viewed by people other than those for whom they were originally intended!
    • Always use your spell checker, and avoid slang.
    Internal Email
  • 34.
    • Subject Lines are Headlines
    • Make One Point per Email
    • Specify the Response You Want
    • Using EOM Headlines
    • Be a Good Correspondent
    • Internal Email
    Quick Review…
  • 35.
    • So go and do likewise.
    • As Master Yoda has said,
    • “ Do or do not, there is no try.”
    • Best wishes for more effective emailing in the future.
    • Thank you!!!
    So now you know…
  • 36.
    • www.mindtools.com
    • “ Writing Effective E-Mail: Improving Your Electronic Communication” -- Nancy Flynn – 116 pages
    • “ How to Write Effective E-mails: Penguin Writer's Guide” -- R. L. Trask – 224 pages
    • “ Writing Effective E-Mail: Practical Strategies for Strengthening Electronic Communication” – Verne Meyer – 121 pages
    • 15 Top Tips for Effective Email Communication :
    • http://www.thewritemarket.com/mcnn/index.php?mcnn=keel&title=15%20Top%20Tips%20for%20Effective%20Email%20Communication
  • 37.
    • Myles Miller – SSI
      • Email: myles.miller@ssi-learn.com
      • PH# 717-329-7073
    • Tom Mattus – SSI
      • Email: tom.mattus@ssi-learn.com
      • PH# 877-390-3057