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  • 1. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCONTENTSMessage from the Dean............................................................................2Staff Listing....................................................................................................3Definitions ....................................................................................................7General Information & Regulations......................................................7Student Prizes............................................................................................ 21Postgraduate Studies.............................................................................. 22Course Listing ........................................................................................... 25Specials Accounting............................................................................................ 25 Banking and Finance.......................................................................... 25 Economics.............................................................................................. 26 International Relations...................................................................... 27 Management Studies......................................................................... 27 Psychology............................................................................................. 28 Public Sector Management ............................................................ 29 Social Work ........................................................................................... 29Majors Accounting............................................................................................ 30 Economics.............................................................................................. 31 Government.......................................................................................... 32 Hospitality Option............................................................................... 32 Tourism Option.................................................................................... 33 International Tourism Management............................................. 34 Diploma Leadership and Management......................................................... 35 Public Sector Management............................................................. 45 Management Studies......................................................................... 38 Caribbean Studies............................................................................... 46 Psychology . .......................................................................................... 39 Security Administration.................................................................... 46 Sociology................................................................................................ 39 Certificates Sports Management ......................................................................... 40 Public Administration........................................................................ 47Minors Local Government Studies............................................................... 47 Accounting............................................................................................ 41 Management Information Systems.............................................. 48 Criminology........................................................................................... 41 Public Sector Human Resource Management.......................... 48 Economics.............................................................................................. 41 Other Electives Finance.................................................................................................... 42 Workplace Protocol for Students . ................................................ 49 Gender and Development Studies............................................... 42 Language Courses............................................................................... 49 Government ......................................................................................... 42 Course Descriptions for all Courses................................................... 50 Human Resource Management .................................................... 42 Appendices: Special Regulation International Relations...................................................................... 42 I. “Summer” School....................................................................... 97 Management Information Systems.............................................. 42 II. Degrees in Hospitality & Tourism Management............ 98 Management Studies......................................................................... 43 III. Dip. in Public Sector Management...................................... 99 Marketing............................................................................................... 43 IV. Dip. in Caribbean Studies........................................................ 99 Public Sector Management............................................................. 43 V. Dip. in Security Administration............................................. 99 Psychology . .......................................................................................... 43 VI. Cert. in Public Administration..............................................100 Social Policy . ........................................................................................ 43 VII. Cert. in Local Government Studies....................................100 Sociology................................................................................................ 44 VIII. Cert. in Management Information Systems....................100 Sports Management........................................................................... 45 IX. Cert. in Public Sector Human Resource Management.. 101 
  • 2. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN Greetings from the Faculty of Social Sciences! I take pleasure in directing your attention to the contents of the Faculty of Social Sciences Regulations and Syllabus booklet. It is designed to provide the student and other interested persons with a condensed and informative introduction to the Faculty’s undergraduate programmes. We at the Faculty trust that you will make good use of this op- portunity to review the courses we offer. As you discover the wide range of possibilities that the Faculty places at your disposal, do not hesitate to ask questions and provide us with suggestions to make this brochure easier to use. Once again, I invite you to explore our environment. It is our proud tradition to encourage you to ask questions about, and to provide answers to, the challenges and issues facing the Carib- bean and the wider world. Please ensure that you read this booklet carefully. Best wishes, Hamid Ghany Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences
  • 3. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESStaff Listing IT OFFICER IThe Faculty Office is located in the new Social Sciences Mr. Manohar SookhooAdministration Building B.Sc., M.Sc. UWITelephone: 1 (868) 662 2002 Ext. 2027 Implementation, monitoring and security of theFax: 1 (868) 662 6295 Faculty’s Computer SystemE-mail: fss@fss.uwi.tt Tel: Ext.. 3851Dean PC support technicianDr. Hamid Ghany Mr. Nigel MoorganAdministration of Faculty’s affairs B.Sc. Information Systems and ManagementTel: Ext. 2028 Installation, maintenance and security of the Faculty’s computer systemAg. Dean’s Secretary Tel: Ext. 2574Mrs. Chanroutee NaraineB.Sc. Ag. ACCOUNTING ASSISTANTCoordinates meetings, schedules and visits, ATSS, HRM Ms. Melissa DilbarTel: Ext. 2027 B.Sc. Processing all Faculty financial transactionsAg. Secretary/Stenographer Tel: Ext. 2407Ms. Alicia Blaise-FergusStudent matters (course registration, appointments with the Clerical AssistantSDeputy Dean (Undergraduate Studies) Ms. Merquina LawsonTel: Ext. 3042 Assists with classroom and tutorial scheduling Tel: Ext. 2406Secretary/StenographerMrs. Karen Harrison Ms. Jeselle JosephPostgraduate student matters, appointments with the Deputy AdministrationDean (Graduate Studies and Research) Tel: Ext. 2404and Secretary to Faculty BoardTel: Ext. 2673 Mrs. Melissa Robertson-Llewellyn AdministrationAdministrative Assistants Tel: Ext 2406Mrs. Sandra Roopchand-KhanB.Sc. Ms. Bernadette BethelUndergraduate Programmes, Faculty’s business projects, “Summer” School AdministrationStudy Abroad Programmes and Events Management Tel: Ext. 2408(FSS Computer Laboratory, ATSS staff and the Faculty’s website)Tel: Ext. 3232 Ms. Romona Ramnarain AdministrationMrs. Sharon Reddock Tel: Ext. 2405Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justiceand Distance Education Programme Mr. Azariah HoyteTel: Ext. 3352 Administration Tel: Ext. 3048Mrs. Vidiya Mahabir-RamlakhanGraduate Studies and Maintenance of Plant and Equipment Mr. Kwasi JobityTel: Ext. 2672 Banner Support Tel: Ext. 2674Mrs. Marissa Joseph-VictorAPS OFFICE ASSISTANTSFaculty’s Evening University and “Summer” School Programmes Mr. David JohnsonTel: Ext. 2408, 3048 or 645-5383 Maintenance Supervisor Tel: Ext. 3870 
  • 4. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESMr. Emrold Sampson Cameron-Padmore, Jacqueline (Mrs.)Day Programmes B.Sc., UWI, M.Sc. Columbia UniversityTel: Ext. 2409 Lecturer/Practicum Coordinator Rm. 213Mr. Ronnie Budhooram Tel: Ext. 3046Evening University ProgrammesTel: Ext. 2409 Chadee, Derek (Dr.) B.Sc., Ph.D. UWIMr. Geeno Sookhoo Senior LecturerDay Programmes Rm. 04Tel: Ext. 2409 Tel: Exts. 2172/2402Mr. Anthony Sumair-Worrell Onwubiko Agozino (Professor)Evening University Programmes B.Sc. Calabar, M.Phil. Cambridge University, Ph.D. EdinburghTel: Ext. 2409 Tel: Exts. 2172/ 2402Department of Behavioural Sciences Ghany, Hamid (Dr.)Office: Rooms 233, 235, 237 B.A. UWI, M.A. Fordham, Ph.D. LondonTel: Exts. 2539, 2024, 2020 Senior Lecturer, Office of the DeanE-mail: deptbhsc@fss.uwi.tt Tel: Ext. 2028Head Hadeed, Linda (Dr.)Mustapha, Nasser (Dr.) B.A. Pennsylvania, M.SW., Ph.D. Columbia UniversityB.Sc., M.Phil., Ph.D. UWI LecturerTel: Ext. 2023 Rm. 212 Tel: Ext. 3576SecretaryMrs. Nisha Alladin-Motilal Holder-Dolly, Jennifer (Dr.)Tel: Ext. 2020 B.Sc., UWI, M.Sc. Col.,Ph.D. Union Institute & Ohio University, LecturerAdministrative Assistant Deane HouseMs. Wenda Rocke Tel: 663 6810Tel: Ext. 3865 Kamugisha, AaronACADEMIC STAFF B.Sc., M.Phil UWI, Ph.D YorkAlea, Nicole (Dr.)B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D University of Florida Mahabir, Raghunath (Dr.)Rm. 02 B.A., M.Sc. Ph.D., UWITel: Ext. 2671 Lecturer Campus HouseBissessar, Anne Marie (Dr.) Tel: Ext. 3663B.A., M.Sc., Ph.D. UWISenior Lecturer Marshall, Ronald (Dr.)Rm. 207 B.A. UWI, M.A., Ph.D. Howard UniversityTel: Ext. 2019 Lecturer Rm. 225ABrown, Dennis A (Dr.) (on leave 2008/2009) Tel: Ext. 3056B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.UWILecturer Phillips, Daphne (Dr.)Rm. 220 B.Sc., M.Sc. UWI, Ph.D. IllinoisTel: Ext. 3053 Lecturer Tel: Ext. 2670Cambridge, Innette (Dr.)B.A. Moorhead, L.Soc., M.Soc. Paris, Ph.D. University of Bristol Ragoonath, Bishnu (Dr.)Lecturer B.Sc. M.Sc., Ph.D. UWIRm. 211 Senior LecturerTel: Ext. 3062 Rm. 209 Tel: Ext. 3047
  • 5. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESRollocks, Steve (Dr.) Henry, Lester (Dr.)B.Sc., M.A. Long Island University, B.A. Brooklyn College, CUNY, M.A., Ph.D., Mass.M.A., Ph.D. New Sch. for Social Research LecturerLecturer Rm. 214Rm. 06 Tel: Ext. 3044Tel: Ext. 2400 Hosein, Roger (Dr.)Sogren, Michele (Ms.) B.Sc., M.Sc., UWI, Ph.D. Cantab.Cert. in Social Work, B.Sc., M.SW., UWI (Mona), CSW, B.Sc. UWI, LecturerM.Sc. Columbia University Rm. 218Lecturer Tel: 3041Rm. 224ATel: Ext. 3061 La Foucade, Althea (Dr.) B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. UWI, Univ. of TorontoValtonen, Kathleen (Dr.) (on leave 2008/2009) LecturerM.A., University of Aberdeen, M.SW., University of Alabama, Rm. 208Ph.D. University of Turku Tel: Exts. 3050/3057Senior Lecturer & HeadRm. 239 Laptiste, Christine (Ms.)Tel: Ext. 2023 B.Sc., M.Sc. UWI LecturerDepartment of Economics Rm. 204Office: Room 203 Tel: Ext. 2631E-mail: economics.department@sta.uwi.eduTel: Ext. 2630 Mahabir, Dhanayshar (Dr.) B.Sc. UWI, M.A., Ph.D. McGillHead LecturerProf. Dennis A. Pantin Rm. 216Tel: Ext. 2017 Tel: Ext. 3233Secretary Mc Guire, Gregory (Mr.)Mrs. Avril Patterson-Pierre B.Sc., M.Sc. , UWITel: Ext. 2018 Lecturer Rm. Faculty of Social SciencesClerical Assistant Tel: Ext. 3852Mrs. Bernadette HamletTel: Ext. 3231 Mc Lean, Roger (Mr.) B.Sc., M.Sc., UWIACADEMIC STAFF LecturerAlghalith, Moawia (Dr.) Rm. 222Lecturer Tel: Ext. 3055Rm. 204 BTel: Ext. 3875 Mohammed, Anne-Marie (Dr.) B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. UWI Assistant LecturerAttzs, Marlene (Dr.) Evening UniversityB.Sc., M.Sc. Ph.D. UWI, Tel: Ext. 2306LecturerRm. 200 Pantin, Dennis A. (Professor)Tel: Ext. 3814 Professor & Head B.Sc. UWI, M.Phil. SussexFranklin, Martin (Mr.) Rm. 205B.Sc. UWI, M.Sc. McGill Tel: Ext. 2017LecturerRm. 222 Scott, Ewan (Dr.)Tel: Ext. 3055 A.Sc., B.Sc. (Agric.), M.Sc. (Agric. Econ.) UWI, Ph.D. Univ. of Florida Lecturer Rm. 208 Tel: Ext. 3057 
  • 6. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESTeelucksingh, Sonja (Dr.) Bhatnagar, Chandra S. (Dr.)B.Sc. UWI, M.Sc., Ph.D. York (U.K.) B. Comm., M.B.A., Ph.D. Punjabi Univ.Lecturer Senior LecturerRm. 210 Rm. 214Tel: Ext. 2398 Tel: Ext. 3299Theodore, Karl (Professor) Bowrin, Anthony (Dr.)B.A., M.Sc. Lond., Ph.D. Boston B.Sc., M.Sc. Accounting UWI,Rm. 206 Ph.D. Southern Illinois UniversityTel: Ext. 662-9459 Lecturer Rm. 209Department of Management Studies Tel: Ext. 3303Office: Management Studies BuildingTel: Exts. 3297/2105 Brunton, Terence (Mr.)E-mail: deptmgmt@fss.uwi.tt B.Sc. UWI, M.Sc. Acc. UWI, M.Sc. MIS Penn State Univ. LecturerMr. Errol Simms Rm. 206Head Tel: Ext. 3305Tel: Ext. 2104 Fraser, Simon (Mr.)Ms. Patsy Marcano B.Sc., UWI, M.B.A. ColumbiaAdministrative Assistant LecturerTel: Exts. 3297/2105 Rm. 210 Tel: Ext. 2303Mrs. Pavitra MoonsammySecretary Gundala, Rhaghava Rao (Dr.)Tel: Ext. 2105 M.B.A. and M.Com. Andhra University Ph.D. Berhampur UniversityMs. Carlene Stephens Rm. 109-1Clerical Assistant Tel: Ext. 3926Tel: Ext. 3297 Jordan-Miller, Leslie-Ann (Dr.)ACADEMIC STAFF B.Sc. UWI, Dip., Ph.D. Otago LecturerArjoon, Surendra (Mr.) Rm. 219BB.Math Waterloo, M.A. Western Ontario Tel: Ext. 3530Senior LecturerRm. 215 Katwaroo-Rabgir, Sherry (Mrs.)Tel: Ext. 2302 Lecturer ACMA and B.Sc., UWIBalwant, Paul (Mr.) Rm. 207M.Sc., B.Sc., UWI, St. Augustine Tel: Ext. 3502LecturerRm. 218 Lewis-Cameron, Acolla (Dr.)Tel: Ext. 3298 B.Sc. UWI, M.Sc. Surrey, Ph.D. Brunel University LecturerBaptiste, Roland (Mr.) Rm. 219AB.A., M.A. Howard, M.Sc. UMIST Tel: Ext. 2621Senior LecturerRm. 208 Pacheco, Barney (Dr.)Tel: Ext. 3301 B.Sc. UWI, M.Sc. Concordia, Ph.D. Colorado LecturerBaptiste-Cornelis, Therese (Mrs.) Rm. 212B.Sc. UWI, M.B.A University of British Columbia Tel: Ext. 3300LecturerRm. 109-3Tel: Ext. 3927
  • 7. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESRaghunandan, Moolchand (Mr.) DEFINITIONSB.Sc. Univ Guyana, M.Sc. UWI In the Regulations, “Free electives” refers to courses listed in theLecturer Faculty Handbook which are optional in the degree programmeRm. 211 concerned.Tel: Ext. 3304 “Level I” in relation to a Faculty other than the Faculty of Social ,Ramlakhan, Prakash (Mr.) Sciences, refers to the stage of a degree programme at the end ofLecturer which a candidate who has completed all the examinations is eligibleB.Sc. and M.Sc. UWI, C.F.A. to complete the programme within the next two years withoutRm. 213 registering for “Summer” School sessions.Tel: Ext. 3563 “Prerequisite” means a course listed in the Faculty Handbook asRamlogan, Rajendra (Dr.) one that must be completed before being permitted to register forB.A., L.LB. UWI, L.E.C. Hugh Wooding Law School, another course.L.LM., New York Univ., Ph.D. Cantab.Senior Lecturer “Summer” School sessions refer to the sessions Appendices governedRm. 204 by the “Summer” School Regulations (see Page 87).Tel: Ext. 3724Simms, Errol (Mr.) GENERAL INFORMATION & REGULATIONSB.Sc., M.Sc. UWI, M.B.A. OhioSenior Lecturer & Head General Regulations for Bachelor of Science degrees*Rm. 221 *Special regulations for the degrees in Hospitality and TourismTel: Ext. 2104 Management can be found in the Appendices.Computer Laboratory Qualifications for AdmissionE-mail: comp_lab@fss.uwi.tt 1.1 Before registration and before beginning courses in the1-868-645-7856 or 662-2002 ext.3558 Faculty the candidate must have satisfied the UniversityAddress: House No. 2, Lewis Avenue, matriculation requirements for entry to a degreeSt. Augustine Campus programme.Laboratory Technician: Ms. Sophia Persad, B.Sc., UWI 1.2 On entry to the University at Mona and St. Augustine, students may be required by the Faculty Board to take an English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT). Students failing this test may be required by the Faculty Board to do a prescribed course in English as a prerequisite to the compulsory Foundation Course, FD10A – English for Academic Purposes. Students with the following qualifications are exempted from the ELPT examination: (i) A grade ‘A’ or ‘B’ in General Paper, (ii) Grade I in CXC English Language (General Proficiency). 1.3 Applicants for entry into Economics, Accounting, Management Studies; Psychology and Statistics (Mona) degree options (specials and majors) are required to have a minimum of a Grade II pass in CXC (General) Mathematics or a qualification deemed by the Faculty Board to be equivalent. 1.4 Level I Students who passed CXC General Proficiency Mathematics with a grade less than two (2) or who have been away from Mathematics for at least five (5) years, are required to read the EC08A Remedial Mathematics before reading ECON 1003. 
  • 8. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESTransfers 4.6 Subject to Faculty regulations, co-curricular credits willInter- and Intra-Faculty Transfers form part of the ninety (90) credits REQUIREDfor a degree.2.1 Students in another Faculty who have completed Level I of a However, in special circumstances, if credits are earned in degree programme of The University of the West Indies are excess of those required for the degree, these credits and eligible for transfer to the Level II of a degree programme the associated activity will be included on the student’s offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Such students must, transcript. at the time of transfer, have passed courses which satisfy the Level I requirements of the Faculty of Social Sciences, 4.7 Co-curricular course credits can only be counted as/in as well as the prerequisites of the relevant courses of the place of Level One course credits. programme into which they are seeking a transfer. Co-curricular course offered by the Faculty of Social2.2 Transfers may also be offered to any student registered in Sciences: “Workplace Protocol for Students Programme” any other Faculty of The University of the West Indies who has successfully completed the Level I prerequisites to Levels Level I Requirements II and III courses in the intended Major or Special and has 5.1 Students must satisfy the requirements for a minimum of also completed the required foundation course(s). thirty (30) credits at Level I comprising: a. such foundation courses as are required and offered;2.3 For transfer to the Level II of a degree programme offered b. other compulsory courses in the chosen degree option as by the Faculty of Social Sciences (Mona), students registered specified in the Faculty Handbook; prior to 1998-99 may include among the courses passed: c. free electives to bring the total credits to thirty (30). Essentials in English (UC010, UC001) or Use of English (UC120). Foundation Courses 5.2 a. As of 1998-99 all students registered in The University ofCourse of Study the West Indies will be required to complete a minimum3. Candidates for any of the degree programmes must pursue of nine (9) credits of foundation courses. These courses a course of study comprising at least ninety (90) credits with are Level I courses designed to promote sensitivity to, at least thirty (30) credits at Level I and sixty (60) credits and awareness of, distinctive characteristic features at Levels II and III. The Faculty Board may require that of Caribbean cosmologies, identities and culture. The registration in particular courses be timed to such as to foundation courses comprise: ensure that the course of study extends over either at least i. FD10A (FOUN 1001) - English for Academic five (5) semesters and two (2) “Summer” School sessions or Purposes six (6) semesters. ii. FD12A (FOUN 1201) - Science, Medicine and Technology in Society *Special regulations exist for the B.Sc. Degrees in Hospitality iii. FD11A (FOUN 1101) - Caribbean Civilization and Tourism Management (See page 88). iv. FD13A (FOUN 1301) - Law, Governance, Economy and Society v. any other course approved for this purpose by theCo-curricular Credits Board of Undergraduate Studies4.1 Students will be eligible for no more than three (3) credits for involvement in co-curricular activities. The activities may b. Students registered in the Faculty of Social Sciences will be Campus specific. be required to include among such foundation courses English for Academic Purposes.4.2 Co-curricular credits will be awarded on the following basis: c. The elective Foundation course "Law, Governance, a. students must be involved in the activity for at least Economy and Society" will not count for credit in the one (1) semester; programme of the Faculty of Social Sciences except b. explicit learning outcomes must be identified for each with the permission of the Dean. activity; c. there must be clearly defined mode(s) of assessment d. Exemption in whole or in part from the requirements for each activity. under [4.2(a–b)] may be granted from time to time by the Board for Undergraduate Studies.4.3 A Faculty Coordinator will be appointed, with the responsibility for the awarding co-curricular credits. Requirements for Entry to Level II and4.4 Co-curricular activities will be graded Pass/Fail. III 6. Students are required to satisfy prerequisites (where they4.5 All co-curricular activities/programmes must be approved exist) for Level II and III courses. in advance by the Faculty and Academic Board.
  • 9. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESRequirements for the Award of the 7.3.2 A major is available from among the following subject areas:Degree Accounting (Cave Hill, Mona)7.1 In order to qualify for the award of a degree a student Economics (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) must: Government (St. Augustine) a. have completed a minimum of ninety (90) credits International Relations (Mona) (normally equivalent to thirty (30) semester courses) International Tourism Management (St. Augustine) of which: Leadership and Management (St. Augustine) i. at least thirty (30) credits are from Level I Management Studies (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) semester courses (including the foundation course Political Science (Cave Hill, Mona) requirement), and Public Administration (Mona) ii. at least sixty (60) credits from Levels II and III Public Sector Management (Cave Hill) semester courses Psychology (Mona, St. Augustine) Sociology (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) b. have satisfied the requirements for their specific degree Sports Management (St. Augustine) programmes Statistics (Mona)7.2 Degrees are offered in the following categories: 7.3.3 Minors may be declared from among the following Special subject areas: Major Accounting (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) Double major African and African Diaspora Studies (Mona) Major and one minor Criminology (St. Augustine) Major and two minors Demography (Mona) Economics (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine)7.3 A student must be formally registered in one of these Finance (St. Augustine) categories: Gender & Development Studies (St. Augustine) • A special comprises a minimum of forty-five (45) credits Government (St. Augustine) in the subject area over Levels II and III. History (Cave Hill) • A major is made up of a minimum of thirty (30) credits Human Resource Management (St. Augustine) in the subject area over Levels II and III. International Relations (Mona, St. Augustine) • A double major is made up of a minimum of thirty (30) Law (Cave Hill) credits each in two subject areas over Levels II and III. Management Studies (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) Students cannot read for Psychology as a second major. Management Information Systems (St. Augustine) Students wishing to pursue a double major must apply Marketing (St. Augustine) in writing to The Assistant Registrar, Student Affairs, Mathematics (Cave Hill) Admissions Political Science (Cave Hill, Mona) • A major/minor comprises a minimum of thirty (30) Public Sector Management (Cave Hill, St. Augustine) Level II and III credits in the subject area of the major Psychology (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) and fifteen (15) Level II and III credits in the subject Sociology (Mona, St. Augustine) area of the minor. Minors must be declared in the first Social Policy Administration (Mona) semester of the final year of study. Social Policy (St. Augustine) Social Psychology (Mona)7.3.1 A special degree is available from among the following Sports Management (St. Augustine) subject areas only: Statistics (Mona) Accounting (Cave Hill, St. Augustine) Economics (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine) 7.3.4 The degree majors with which the above minors may Business, Economics & Social Statistics (Mona) be combined will be approved by the Faculty Board and Hospitality and Tourism Management Board for Undergraduate Studies and listed as programme (Cave Hill, St. Augustine) offerings in the Faculty Handbook. Hotel Management (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine, Bahamas) International Relations (St. Augustine) Management Studies (Cave Hill, St. Augustine) Psychology (St. Augustine) Public Sector Management (Cave Hill, St. Augustine) Sociology (Cave Hill) Social Work (Mona, St. Augustine) Tourism Management (Cave Hill, Mona, St. Augustine, Bahamas) 
  • 10. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES7.3.5 Students may also request to combine a Social Sciences Regulations for Part-time major with a minor offered by another Faculty. To do this, the permission of the Deans of both Faculties must Programme 9. a. A part-time programme is offered for Level I of the B.Sc. be obtained. At St. Augustine, which includes students degree at all campuses with the exception of the St. may register in the Faculty for a double major a major Augustine Campus where only the B.Sc. in Accounting is offered by another Faculty. By special arrangement with part-time. Equivalent registration is available under the the Faculty of Science & Agriculture (St. Augustine), Evening University programme (see Evening University students may register for a double major comprising any regulations). Part-time registration is permitted Levels of the majors offered in the Faculty of Social Sciences and II and III are available in all programmes offered at the Mathematics in the Faculty of Science & Agriculture (St. Cave Hill Campus. At the Mona Campus part-time Augustine).To do this, the permission of the Deans of both registration is permitted in the B.Sc. Management faculties must be obtained. Studies (major), B.Sc. Accounting (major) and the B.Sc. International Relations (major). Part-time registration7.3.6 A student may with the permission of the Dean change is not permitted at Levels II and III at the St. Augustine any Major, Special or Minor for which they registered. Campus execpt in the B.Sc. in Accounting.Regulations for Full-time Programme b. The Faculty Board may require that the timing of8. A full-time student: registration in particular courses ensure that the course a. shall complete the degree programme in not more than of study for the Level I programme extends over at least eleven (11) semesters and five (5) “Summer” School three (3) semesters inclusive of one (1) “Summer” School sessions; session. b. will, unless the Academic Board approves otherwise on c. A part-time student whose GPA for a given semester the recommendation of the Faculty Board, be required is less than or equal to 0.75 shall be deemed to be to register for ten (10) semester courses in any one performing unsatisfactorily, and shall be placed on (1) year and five (5) semester courses in any one (1) warning. A student on warning whose GPA for the semester. Permission may be sought for not more than succeeding semester is less than 0.75, will be required one additional course for the year by any student who to withdraw. needs that course for completion of the requirements for their degree or who has been awarded a grade of d. Once a part-time student transfers into the full-time ‘A’ as the examination mark for more than half of their programme, he/she is required to maintain the rate of courses which have been registered in the Faculty. progress associated with the full-time programme. c. a student whose GPA for a given semester is N.B.Credits gained from courses done in another less than or equal to 0.75 shall be deemed to be programme will not be counted towards the rate of performing unsatisfactorily and shall be placed on progress. warning. A student on warning whose GPA for the succeeding semester is less than 0.75, will be required to withdraw. Registration / Examinations 10. a. Students will be examined during each semester and the “Summer” session in the courses for which they are N.B. Credits gained from courses done in another registered. programme will not be counted towards the rate of progress. b. a course may be examined by one or more of the Full-time students may engage in employment for not following methods: more than twelve (12) hours per week. i. written examination papers ii. oral examination (under the conditions in Regulation 12 - see next page) iii. practical examinations iv. coursework (which may include written in- course tests, practical work, dissertations, essays, projects, studies and other forms of coursework as approved by the Faculty Board or the Campus Committee on Examinations). c. In the Faculty of Social Sciences at the St. Augustine Campus a course normally constitutes three (3) credits.10
  • 11. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES d. A student failing a course may, subject to the rate of Coursework progress requirements of these regulations, be allowed 11. a. In the case of examination by coursework a student to substitute another approved course in a subsequent gaining an overall mark higher than 40% but passing in semester or repeat the failed course. only one component will be required to repeat at the next available sitting the component that was failed. e. All optional courses (electives) listed in the various degree programmes in the Faculty Handbook will not b. Only a coursework mark of 40% will be transferred within necessarily be available in any one year. the period outlined i.e. 2 year limit. A student who meets this requirement must not attempt coursework for the f. Deadlines for changes of registration including said period, as this approval will become null and void. withdrawal from or addition of courses will be as prescribed in University Regulations. c. A student who is absent from a coursework examination may apply to the Dean of the Faculty for exemption g. Students wishing to pursue a course not for credit (NFC) from this examination no later than one (1) week after must seek approval prior to taking the course. All such the date of this examination. He/she must at the same requests must be made, in writing, to the Dean of the time submit to the Campus Registrar justification for Faculty. such absence (such as, in case of illness, a medical certificate complying with any applicable Examination h. Registration for a course constitutes registration for the Regulations). The Dean shall consider any such request examination in that course. for exemption in consultation with the relevant Head of Department and course lecturer. If the exemption is i. A student will be deemed to have registered for a course granted, the percentage mark available to be awarded when his/her financial obligations to the University for the final examination will be increased accordingly. have been fulfilled. d. A student may request to submit coursework j. A student who does not take an examination in a course assignments, essays, etc. after the stipulated deadline for which he/she is registered is deemed to have failed date on the basis of appropriate justification (such as, that examination unless permission to be absent has in case of illness, a medical certificate complying with been granted. any applicable Examination Regulations). This request must be normally made within forty-eight (48) hours k. A student who, on grounds of illness or in other special after the stipulated deadline date and must be addressed circumstances as referred to in Examination Regulation to the Dean, who in consultation with the relevant 25, fails to take an examination in a course for which Head of Department and course lecturer may allow he/she is registered, may be given special consideration the extension. The Dean, acting on the advice of the by the Board of Examiners to take the examination at relevant Head of Department and course lecturer, may the next available opportunity, without penalty. consider requests for exemption from submission of the coursework assignment, essays, etc. If the exemption is l. Students are asked to pay special attention to granted, the percentage mark available to be awarded Examination Regulation 23 which states: for the final examination will be increased accordingly. “Any candidate who has been absent from the University for a prolonged period during the year for Oral Examination for any reason other than illness or whose attendance at Final Year Students prescribed lectures, classes, practical classes, tutorial 12. a. The Board of Examiners MAY recommend to the or clinical instructions has been unsatisfactory or who department concerned that a student who has failed has failed to submit essays or other exercises set by his the last one or two course(s) required to complete their teachers may be debarred by the relevant Academic degree be offered an oral examination in the course(s) Board, on the recommendation of the relevant Faculty provided that he/she has obtained, in each instance, a Board, from taking any University examinations.” mark of at least 35% for the course(s). b. If an oral examination is granted the student may choose to decline the offer. c. The oral examination, which will be of a maximum length of one (1) hour, will be held as soon as possible after the previous examination. The student must contact the department concerned immediately so that arrangements may be made for the oral examination. 11
  • 12. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES d. The oral examination will concern the course as a b. From UWI Diplomas – whole, and not be restricted to the questions set in A student who, prior to pursuing a Degree, has the examination, which the student sat previously. The successfully completed a Diploma first examiner and at least one other examiner must be (i) will receive credits and exemptions up to a maximum present at an oral examination. of eighteen (18) credits/exemptions, i.e. 6 courses, of which nine (9) credits/exemptions must be Level I e. If the examination is passed, the student cannot be courses. awarded a grade higher than 40% (C) and this grade will replace the once up to this point previously gained c. A student who has successfully pursued both a UWI for course. Certificate and Diploma (i) will receive credits and exemptions up to a maximum f. If he/she fails the oral examination, the student will not of twenty-seven (27) credits/exemptions, i.e. 9 have any right of appeal or review. courses, of which eighteen (18) credits/exemptions must be Level I courses. g. A student will be allowed only one (1) oral examination for any one (1) course. d. A student who is currently enrolled in a Degree programme, and pursues courses in the “Summer”Policy Statement on the Award of Programme, will be granted credits and exemptions for all courses pursued towards the completion ofExemptions and/or Exemptions and his/her degree, providing that the course(s) pursuedCredits for Undergraduate Studies in in the “Summer” Programme is/are deemed the sameThe Faculty of Social Sciences or equivalent to that offered in the normal stream.13. The granting of exemptions and credit/exemptions are as follows:- e. A student who has successfully completed individual a. From UWI Certificates – courses in the “Summer” Programme before enrolment A student who, prior to taking the Certificate has: in a Degree programme, i.e. did not enrol in any of the (i) normal level matriculation (five (5) O-Levels and Certificate or Diploma programmes, will be granted up two (2) or more A-Levels) will receive credits and to a maximum of twelve (12) exemptions/credits i.e. 4 exemptions for all Level I courses successfully courses. completed up to a maximum of thirty (30) credits/ exemptions, i.e. 10 courses. f. A student who has been accepted to pursue any Certificate or undergraduate Diploma programme (ii) lower level matriculation (a minimum of five (5) offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences, and has O-Levels) will receive credits and exemptions for successfully completed a TLI approved programme, all Level I courses successfully completed up to a will be granted up to a maximum of nine (9) credits/ maximum of eighteen (18) credits/exemptions, i.e. 6 exemptions. courses.* g. A student seeking exemptions/credits in excess of (iii) no matriculation/mature route (up to four (4) the limits stated in f. above will be granted exemption O-Levels) will receive credits and exemptions for only and will be required to pursue a substitute course all Level I courses successfully completed up to a relevant to the field of study. maximum of twelve (12) credits/exemptions, i.e. 4 courses. * h. From three-year Associate Degree Programme Accredited Tertiary Learning Institutions (TLI): *no credit from a particular course which means that they must do another course approved fro their deree (i) Credits/ exemptions will be granted for all courses programme. that have been assessed by UWI (in 1998) for equivalency with specific UWI courses if a minimum Also, the granting of credits and exemptions in no way B grade (TLI grading) has been achieved. * exempts a student from the University requirement of pursuing and passing nine (9) credits of foundation *This exercise is an on-going one and TLI courses approved courses. by the relevant Assessment Committee after 1998 will be granted exemptions/credits. The granting of exemptions and credits/exemptions must be based on equivalency to courses in each i. From other universities: degree option. (i) A student transferring from another university to register for a UWI degree will have to do a minimum In keeping with UWI’s policy, exemptions and credits/ of two years of full-time study (60 credits). exemptions will only be granted for courses which have been successfully pursued within the last five (5) years.12
  • 13. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (ii) Unless Departments already have a record of Withdrawal the particular courses, course outlines are to be 14.1 A student whose GPA for a given semester is less than or equal submitted for departments to make an assessment. to 0.75 shall be deemed to be performing unsatisfactorily, and Any course approved by departments will earn shall be placed on warning. A student on warning whose GPA students credit/exemption from UWI equivalent for the succeeding semester is less than 0.75, will be required courses – up to the limit indicated by (a) above i.e. to withdraw up to a maximum of 30 credits/exemptions. 14.2 A candidate who has been required to withdraw from the (iii) Exemptions only may be granted for any course(s) Faculty may apply to the Faculty for re-admission one (1) in excess of limit indicated. year after withdrawal. Each case will be considered on its own merit, but will only succeed if the Faculty is satisfied thatj. Students doing Study Abroad (Exchange Programmes) the circumstances attending the reasons for the withdrawal at other universities: have altered substantially. (i) Students who seek to do part of their programme at another university (a maximum of two (2) semesters 14.3 Students thus admitted to a Faculty may in accordance with which must not include the final semester of full- its regulations be granted exemption from Level I courses time study) must have the courses they intend to do subject to there being no change in the content of the at the overseas university assessed for equivalence courses and provided that no more than five (5) years have by the relevant department at St. Augustine BEFORE elapsed since the date of withdrawal. Level II University proceeding to study abroad. courses, for the purposes of exemption, may be treated in the same way as Level I Faculty courses. The request to study abroad and the course approved by the department must then be submitted through the Faculty to obtain Academic Board approval. 14.4 Students from one faculty who had been required to withdraw from the University for failing to complete their (ii) When the students’ results are received from the degree programme within the stipulated period may be overseas university, and have been evaluated and admitted to another faculty after a minimum period of one approved, the student will then receive credit for (1) year has elapsed since their withdrawal. Such students the courses as substitutes for the St. Augustine may be granted exemption from Level I courses relevant to equivalent. the new programme subject to Regulations 13.3 and 13.4 above. (iii) It should be noted that first year (100 level) courses in the American four-year undergraduate programme 14.5 Students required to withdraw from the University for failing or elsewhere, will NOT usually warrant any exemption to complete their Diploma or Certificate programme may be from UWI courses. re-admitted to the Faculty after a minimum period of one (1) year has elapsed since their withdrawal. Such students shallk. Students doing a course(s) at other universities to not be granted exemptions from courses in the programme complete their degree programme: previously passed. (i) In an instance where students may be migrating/ must be away from the country for a significant Leave of Absence 15. i. A candidate who for good reason wishes to be absent period and have few courses to complete their UWI from an academic programme for a semester or more degree there may be discretionary decisions made must apply for formal leave of absence to the Campus by the Faculty and sanctioned by Academic Board Faculty Board, through the appropriate Dean, stating to accommodate them. the reason for the application. ii. The length of such leave of absence, if granted, will be subject to approval by the Academic Board of the Campus concerned, but will not exceed one (1) academic year in the first instance terminating at the end of the academic year for which the application is approved. iii. Leave of absence will not be granted for more than two (2) consecutive academic years. 13
  • 14. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES iv. Leave of absence may be granted for one (1) semester Award of Degrees or for an academic year. 18. Notification of Results For those candidates who have completed the requirements v. Applications for leave of absence for a semester shall of the B.Sc. degree a pass list shall be published and arranged normally be submitted by the end of the third week of alphabetically in the following categories: the relevant semester. i. First Class Honours ii. Second Class Honours vi. Applications for leave of absence for the academic year Upper Division shall normally be submitted by the end of the third Lower Division week of Semester I. iii. Pass vii. A student who voluntarily withdraws from the University and who applies for re-admission within Award of Honours – five (5) years shall be granted exemption and credit Grade Point Average System (GPA) for courses previously passed, subject to the time limit Regulations governing Award of for the maintenance of credit stipulated in the relevant Faculty Regulations. All grades previously obtained Degrees 19. (i) The class of degree to be awarded shall be determined shall be used in the determination of the student’s on the basis of a weighted Grade Point Average GPA. (GPA).Admission Criteria for Courses (ii) In the calculation of the weighted GPA, a weight of zeroOffered by the Department of shall be attached to all Level I courses.Management Studies (iii) Levels II and III courses shall have equal weight in the16. Students who wish to pursue Management Studies courses determination of the weighted GPA. and programmes and were not admitted under any of the approved Management Studies specializations, majors or (iv) A course designated at registration as not for credit (NFC) minors or approved double majors offered in conjunction shall not count in the determination of the weighted with the Faculty of Science and Agriculture must: GPA. (i) attain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 (B+ average) in their (v) Core courses satisfying the requirements of previous courses in order to be eligible for admission into specializations, majors and minors must be taken into Levels II /III Management courses. account in the determination of the weighted GPA. (ii) Students who are desirous of pursuing Level I Management (vi) The class of degree shall be awarded as follows: Studies courses will only be admitted with the approval First Class Honours – Weighted GPA of 3.60 and of the Head of the Department of Management Studies above or his/her designated nominee(s) Second Class Honours, Upper Division – Weighted GPA 3.00 – 3.59Admission Criteria for Courses Second Class Honours, Lower Division – Weighted GPAOffered by the Department of 2.00 – 2.99 Pass – Weighted GPA 1.00 – 1.99ECONOMICS17. Students who wish to pursue the Major in Economics and were not admitted under any of the approved Econmics specializations, majors or minors must: (i) attain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 in their previous courses in order to be eligible for admission into Levels II /III Economics courses.14
  • 15. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESMarking Scheme for Examinations in 2. All applications for an aegrotat degree, diploma or certificate must be referred by the Registrar to the Facultythe Faculty of Social Sciences Board of Examiners and the Board for Examinations for20. (i) In the determination of GPA, the grades with a recommendation to Board for Undergraduate Studies. corresponding quality points shall be as defined in the Applications from or on behalf of candidates must be University Regulations governing the GPA. accompanied by a medical certificate signed by (a) University Health Officer, or (b) the Dean of the Faculty of Medical (ii) The authorized marking scheme is as follows: Sciences in consultation with the appropriate members of the Medical School, (c) or other medical personnel GRADE GPA MARKS appointed for this purpose by the University, and shall reach the Registrar not later than thirty (30) days from the last A+ 4.3 86 and over examination paper written by the candidate. A 4.0 70 – 85 A- 3.7 67 – 69 3. In assessing an application for an aegrotat degree, diploma B+ 3.3 63 – 66 or certificate, reports from the appropriate Heads of B 3.0 60 – 62 Departments on the candidate’s work should be taken into B- 2.7 57 – 59 consideration. Oral examinations, where possible, by internal C+ 2.3 53 – 56 examiners may be an aspect of examinations for the award C 2.0 50 – 52 of an aegrotat degree. C- 1.7 47 – 49 D+ 1.3 43 – 46 4. An aegrotat degree, diploma or certificate will be awarded D 1.0 40 – 42 without distinction or class. F 0.0 Less than 40 5. Holders of an aegrotat degree, diploma or certificate willAward of Aegrotat Degree not be permitted to re-enter for the same examination but(Degree, Diploma & Certificate Programmes) may proceed to a higher degree if accepted by the Board1. A candidate taking examinations in respect of a final degree, for Graduate Studies. diploma or certificate programme and who had been absent through illness from one or more papers, may apply for the award of an aegrotat degree, diploma or certificate on the REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE UWI following conditions. EVENING UNIVERSITY For BSc Degrees in a. Where the whole of the final examination for a degree, the Faculty of Social Sciences diploma or certificate is taken at the end of the final year of the course and he/she has completed more than half of the final examination but has been absent from the Qualifications for Admission remainder of that examination. 1.1 Before registration and before beginning courses in the Evening University the candidate must have satisfied the b. Where the final examination is in two or more parts (the University matriculation requirements for entry to a degree award of the degree, diploma or certificate depending programme. on performance in each of these parts) and he/she has successfully completed the first one or two parts and more 1.2 On entry to the Evening University, students may be than half of the final part, but has been absent from the required by the Faculty Board to take an English Language remainder of the examination for the final part. Proficiency Test (ELPT). Students failing this test may be required by the Faculty Board to do a prescribed course c. Where the final examination is in two parts and the in English as a prerequisite to the compulsory Foundation student has completed the first part (second year) with a Course, FD10A – English for Academic Purposes. Students B average or higher and his coursework during the final with the following qualifications are exempt from the ELPT year of the course has been of a consistently high standard, examination: but he/she has been absent from the other part of the (i) A grade ‘A’ or ‘B’ in General Paper, examinations. (ii) Grade I in CXC English Language (General Proficiency). d. The examiners consider that in the work which the candidate has submitted at such of the final examination 1.3 Applicants for entry into Economics, Accounting, as he/she had attended, he/she reached a standard which, Management Studies, Sports Management, Banking and if also reached in the remainder of the examination, would Finance, Psychology and Computer Science degree options have qualified him/her for the award of a degree, diploma (specials and majors) are required to have a minimum of a or certificate. Grade II pass in CXC (General) Mathematics or a qualification deemed by the Faculty Board to be equivalent. 15
  • 16. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCourse of Study Foundation Courses2. Candidates for any of the degree programmes must pursue 5. a. As of 1998–99 all students registered in The University of a course of study comprising at least ninety (90) credits, at the West Indies will be required to complete a minimum least thirty (30) credits at Level I and at least sixty (60) credits of nine (9) credits of foundation courses. These courses at Levels II and III. The Faculty Board may require that the are Level I courses designed to promote sensitivity to, timing of registration in particular courses may be such as and awareness of, distinctive characteristic features of to ensure that the programme of study extends over at least Caribbean cosmologies, identities and culture. six (6) semesters and two (2) “Summer” School sessions. The foundation courses comprise:Co-Curricular Credits i. FD10A (FOUN 1001) - English for Academic3.1 Students will be eligible for no more than three (3) credits Purposes for involvement in co-curricular activities. The activities may ii. FD12A (FOUN 1201) - Science, Medicine and be campus specific. Technology in Society iii. FD11A (FOUN 1101) - Caribbean Civilization3.2 Co-curricular credits will be awarded on the following iv. FD13A (FOUN 1301) - Law, Governance, Economy basis: and Society a. students must be involved in the activity for at least one v. any other course approved for the purpose by (1) semester; the Board of Undergraduate Studies b. explicit learning outcomes must be identified for each activity; b. Students registered in the Faculty of Social Sciences will c. there must be clearly defined mode(s) of assessment for be required to include among such foundation courses each activity. English for Academic Purposes. 3.3 A Faculty Coordinator will be appointed with responsibility c. The elective Foundation Course, Law, Governance, for the award of co-curricular credits. Economy and Society will not count for credit in the programme of the Faculty of Social Sciences except3.4 The grading of co-curricular activities will be pass/fail. with the permission of the Dean.3.5 All co-curricular activities/programmes must be approved d. Exemption in whole or in part from the requirements in advance by the Faculty and Academic Board. under [5(a–b)] may be granted from time to time by the Board for Undergraduate Studies.3.6 Subject to Faculty regulations, co-curricular credits will form. part of the ninety (90) credits for a degree. However, Requirements for Entry to Levels II in special circumstances, if credits are earned in excess of and III those required for the degree, these and the associated 6. Students are required to satisfy prerequisites (where they activity will be included on the student’s transcript. exist) for Levels Il and III courses.3.7 Co-curricular course credits can only be counted as/in place of Level One course credits. Requirements for the Award of the Degree Co-curricular course offered by the Faculty of Social 7.1 In order to qualify for the award of a degree a student Sciences: “Workplace Protocol for Students Programme” must: a. have completed a minimum of ninety (90) creditsLevel I Requirements (normally equivalent to thirty (30) semester courses)4. Students must satisfy the requirements for a minimum of of which: thirty (30) credits at Level I comprising: i. at least thirty (30) credits are from Level I semester a. such foundation courses as are required and offered; courses (including the foundation course b. other compulsory courses in the chosen degree option requirement), and as specified in the Faculty Handbook; ii. at least sixty (60) credits from Levels II and III semester c. free electives to bring the total credits to thirty (30). courses b. have satisfied the requirements for their specific degree programmes 7.2 Degrees are offered in the following categories: Special Major Double major Major and Minor Major and Two Minors16
  • 17. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES7.3 A student must be formally registered in one of these 7.3.6 A student may, with the permission of the Dean, change categories: any major for which that student is registered. • A special comprises a minimum of forty-five (45) credits in the subject area over Levels II and III Rate of Progress/Credits Regulations • A major is made up of a minimum of thirty (30) credits in the subject area over Levels II and III for the Evening University • A double major is made up of a minimum of thirty programmes (30) credits each in two subject areas over Levels II 8. An Evening University student: and III a. shall complete the degree programme in not more than • A minor comprises a minimum of fifteen (15) credits fifteen (15) semesters and seven (7) “Summer” School in the subject area over Levels II and III sessions; • A major/minor comprises a minimum of thirty (30) Levels II and III credits in the subject area of the major b. will, unless the Academic Board approves otherwise and fifteen (15) Levels II and III credits in the subject on the recommendation of the Faculty Board, be area of the minor. required to register for a maximum of eight (8) courses per year/four (4) courses per semester, i.e. twenty-four7.3.2 A major is available from among the following areas: (24) credits per year/twelve (12) credits per semester, B.Sc. Accounting provided that permission may be sought for not more B.Sc. Economics than one additional course per semester by any student B.Sc. Government who needs that one course for completion of the B.Sc. Hospitality & Tourism (Hospitality Option) requirements for the degree or who has been awarded B.Sc. Hospitality & Tourism (Tourism Option) a grade of ‘A’ as the examination mark for more than B.Sc. Hotel Management (Bahamas) half of the courses for which that student has been B.Sc. International Tourism Management examined when registered in the Faculty. B.Sc. Leadership and Management B.Sc. Management Studies c. An Evening University student whose GPA for a given B.Sc. Psychology semester is less than or equal to 0.75 shall be deemed B.Sc. Sociology to be performing unsatisfactorily, and shall be placed B.Sc. Sports Management on warning. A student on warning whose GPA for the succeeding semester is less than 0.75, will be required to7.3.3 A Special is available in the following areas: withdraw. B.Sc. Accounting B. Sc. Economics d. Once an Evening University student transfers into B.Sc. International Relations another programme, he/she is required to maintain B.Sc. Management Studies the rate of progress associated with that programme. B. Sc. Public Sector Management B.Sc. Banking and Finance N.B. Credits gained from courses done in another B.Sc. Psychology programme will not be counted towards the rate of B.Sc. Social Work progress.7.3.4 The degree majors/minors with which the above listed Registration/Examinations majors may be combined will be approved by the Faculty 9. a. Students will be examined during each semester and Board and Board for Undergraduate Studies and listed as the “Summer” School session in the courses for which programme offerings in the Faculty Handbook. they are registered.7.3.5 Students may also request to combine a Social Sciences b. A course may be examined by one or more of the major with a minor offered by another faculty. To do following methods: this, the permission of the Deans of both faculties must i. written examination papers be sought and obtained. Students may also apply to ii. oral (under the conditions in Regulation register in the Faculty of Social Sciences for a double major 10 below) involving any of the Faculty of Social Sciences majors iii. practical examinations and any other majors offered in another faculty at the St. iv. coursework (which may include written in- Augustine campus.To do this, the permission of the Deans course tests, on-line tests, practical work, of both faculties must be sought and obtained. By special dissertations, essays, projects, studies and other arrangement with the Faculty of Science & Agriculture form’s of coursework exercise as approved by (St. Augustine), students may register for a double major the Faculty Board, or the Campus Committee on comprising any of the majors offered in the Faculty of Examinations as appropriate). Social Sciences as one of the two required subject areas and Mathematics in the Faculty of Science & Agriculture c. In the Faculty of Social Sciences, St. Augustine Campus (St. Augustine) as the other. a course constitutes three (3) credits, unless otherwise specified. 17
  • 18. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES d. A student failing an elective course may, subject to the Coursework rate of progress requirements of these regulations be 10. a. In the case of examination by coursework a student allowed to substitute another approved course in a gaining an overall mark higher than 40% but passing subsequent semester or repeat the failed course. in only one component will be required to repeat at the next available sitting the component that was failed. e. All optional courses (electives) listed in the various degree programmes in the Faculty Handbook will not b. A student who is absent from a coursework examination necessarily be available in any one year. may apply to the Dean of the Faculty for exemption from this examination no later than one (1) week f. Deadlines for changes of registration including following the date of this examination. He/she must withdrawal from or addition of courses will be as at the same time submit to the Campus Registrar prescribed in University Regulations. justification for such absence (such as, in case of illness, a medical certificate complying with any applicable g. Students wishing to pursue a course not for credit (NFC) Examination Regulations). The Dean shall consider any must seek approval prior to taking the course. All such such request for exemption in consultation with the requests must be made, in writing, to the Dean of the relevant Head of Department and course lecturer. If the Faculty. exemption is granted, the percentage mark available to be awarded for the final examination will be increased h. Registration for a course constitutes registration for the correspondingly. examination in that course. c. A student may request to submit coursework i. A student will be deemed to have registered for a course assignments, essays, etc. after the stipulated deadline when his/her financial obligations to the University date on the basis of appropriate justification (such have been fulfilled. as, in case of illness, a medical certificate complying with any applicable Examination Regulations). This j. A student who does not take an examination in a course request must be made normally within forty-eight (48) for which he/she is registered is deemed to have failed hours after the stipulated deadline date and must be that examination unless permission to be absent has addressed to the Dean, who in consultation with the been granted. relevant Head of Department and course lecturer may allow the extension. The Dean, acting on advice of k. A student who, on grounds of illness or in other special the relevant Head of Department and course lecturer, circumstances as referred to in Examination Regulation may consider requests for exemption from submission 25 fails to take an examination in a course for which of the coursework assignment, essays, etc. If the he/she is registered, may be given special consideration exemption is granted, the percentage mark available to by the Board of Examiners to take the examination be awarded for the final examination will be increased at the next available opportunity, without academic correspondingly. penalty. Oral Examination for Final Year Students l. Students are asked to pay special attention to 11. a. The Board of Examiners MAY recommend to the Examination Regulation 23 which states: Department concerned that a student who has failed the last one or two course(s) required to complete “Any candidate who has been absent from the the degree be offered an oral examination in that University for a prolonged period during the year for one or those two course(s) provided that he/she has any reason other than illness or whose attendance at obtained in each instance a mark of at least 35% for prescribed lectures, classes, practical classes, tutorial the course(s). or clinical instructions has been unsatisfactory or who has failed to submit essays or other exercises set by his b. If an oral examination is granted the student may teachers may be debarred by the relevant Academic choose to decline the offer. Board, on the recommendation of the relevant Faculty Board, from taking any University examinations.” c. The oral examination, which will be of maximum length of one (1) hour, will be held as soon as possible after m. An Evening University student is subject to all the rules the previous examination. The student must contact and policies on examination matters and exemption the Department concerned immediately so that and credits as stated in the Regulations & Syllabuses arrangements may be made for the oral examination. Booklet of the Faculty of Social Sciences, and other University documents, except when otherwise stated. d. The oral examination will concern the course as a whole, and not be restricted to the questions set in the examination, which the student did. The first examiner and at least one other examiner shall normally be present at an oral examination.18
  • 19. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES e. If the examination is passed, the student cannot be 13.3 Students thus admitted to a Faculty may in accordance awarded a grade higher than 40% - D and this grade will with its regulations be granted exemption from Level I replace that previously gained for the entire evaluation courses subject to there being no change in the content in that course. of the courses and provided that no more than five (5) years have elapsed since the date of withdrawal. Level II f. If he/she fails the oral examination, the student will not University courses, for the purposes of exemption, may be have any right of appeal or review. treated in the same way as Level I Faculty courses. g. A student will be allowed only one (1) oral examination 13.4 Students whose performance in the Level I programme for any one (1) course. indicated general weakness (e.g. bare passes in all courses) may be required by the Faculty to repeat Level I FacultyTransfers courses.Inter and Intra Faculty Transfers12.1 Students registered in programmes offered by the Faculty 13.5 Students from one faculty who had been required to of Social Sciences who have completed Level I of a degree withdraw from the University for failing to complete their programme of The University of the West Indies are eligible degree programme within the stipulated period may be for transfer to the Level II of a degree programme offered admitted to another faculty after a minimum period of one by the Evening University. Such students must at the time (1) year has elapsed since their withdrawal. Such students of transfer, have passed courses which satisfy the Level may be granted exemption from Level I courses relevant to I requirements of the Evening University as well as the the new programme subject to Regulations 13.3 and 13.4 prerequisites of the relevant courses of the programme into above. which the transfer is sought. All transfers will be subject to availability of space. 13.6 Students required to withdraw from the University for failing to complete their Degree, Diploma or Certificate Note: Transfers will be considered at the end of Semester Programme may be re-admitted to the Faculty after a II and will be subject to (i) availability of space; and (ii) minimum period of one (1) year has elapsed since their achievement of a B+ average in courses previously withdrawal. Such students shall not be granted exemptions pursued. from courses in the programme previously passed. 12.2 Transfer to the Evening University may also be offered to Leave of Absence any student registered in any other Faculty of The University 14. i. A candidate who for good reason wishes to be absent of the West Indies and who has successfully completed the from an academic programme for a semester or more Level I prerequisites to Levels II and III courses in the area must apply for formal leave of absence to the Campus of intended major or special and has also completed the Faculty Board, through the appropriate Dean, stating required foundation courses. All transfers will be subject the reason for the application. to availability of space. ii. The length of such leave of absence, if granted, will Note: Transfers will be considered at the end of Semester be subject to approval by the Academic Board of II and will be subject to (i) availability of space; and (ii) the campus concerned, but will not exceed one (1) achievement of a B+ average in courses previously academic year in the first instance exterminating the pursued. end of the academic year for which the application is approved.Withdrawal13.1 A student whose GPA for a given semester is less than or equal iii. Leave of absence will not be granted for more than two to 0.75 shall be deemed to be performing unsatisfactorily, and (2) consecutive academic years. shall be placed on warning. A student on warning whose GPA for the succeeding semester is less than 0.75, will be required iv. Leave of absence may be granted for one (1) semester to withdraw. or for an academic year.13.2 A candidate who has been required to withdraw from the v. Applications for leave of absence for a semester shall Faculty may apply to the Faculty for re-admission one (1) normally be submitted by the end of the third week of year after withdrawal. Each case will be considered on its the relevant semester. own merit, but will only succeed if the Faculty is satisfied that the circumstances attending the reasons for the vi. Applications for leave of absence for the academic year withdrawal have altered substantially. shall normally be submitted by the end of the third week of Semester I. 19
  • 20. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESAward of Degrees General Regulations for15. Notification of Results Diploma Programmes For those candidates who have completed the requirements of the B.Sc. degree a pass list shall be published and arranged alphabetically in the following categories: Evening University Study i. First Class Honours 1. An evening student shall normally complete the Diploma ii. Second Class Honours Programme in not more than three (3) consecutive Upper Division semesters, ie. two (2) semesters and one (1) summer school Lower Division session. iii. Pass 2. An evening student whose GPA for a given semester is lessAward of Honours – than or equal to 0.75 shall be deemed to be performing unsatisfactorily, and shall be placed on warning. An eveningGrade Point Average System (GPA) student on warning whose GPA for the succeeding semester16. (i) The class of degree to be awarded shall be determined is less than 0.75 will be required to withdraw. on the basis of a weighted Grade Point Average (GPA). 3. An evening student shall normally register for a maximum (ii) In the calculation of the weighted GPA, a weight of zero of ten (12) courses per year/ four (4) courses per semester shall be attached to all Level I courses. and four (4) courses in the summer school session. (iii) Levels II and III courses shall have equal weight in the determination of the weighted GPA. (iv) A course designated at registration as not for credit Entry to Examination (NFC) shall not count in the determination of the 4. Entry to the examination will be made at the same time as weighted GPA. registration for the course. Such registration shall take place (v) Core courses satisfying the requirements of during the University registration period. specializations, majors and minors must be taken into account in the determination of the weighted GPA. A fine will be imposed on students whose registration forms (vi) The class of degree shall be awarded as follows: are received late. First Class Honours Notification of Results Weighted GPA of 3.60 and above 5. Candidates who gain the award of the Diploma with Second Class Honours, Upper Division outstanding merit may be awarded a distinction. Weighted GPA 3.00 – 3.59 Second Class Honours, Lower Division a. For the award of the Diploma with Distinction candidates Weighted GPA 2.00 – 2.99 must achieve either: Pass - Weighted GPA 1.00 – 1.99 (i) At least eight (8) grades of A and four (4) grades of B+ or;Marking Scheme for Examinations in (ii) At least ten (10) grades of A and two (2) grades of B.the Faculty of Social Sciences17. (i) In the determination of GPA, the grades with corresponding b. For the award of the Diploma with Honours candidates quality points shall be as defined in the University must achieve either: Regulations governing the GPA. (i) At least eight (8) grades of B+ and four (4) grades (ii) The authorized marking scheme is as follows: of B or; GRADE GPA MARKS (ii) At least ten (10) grades of B+ (including all the A+ 4.3 86 and over compulsory subjects) and two (2) grades of C. A 4.0 70 – 85 A- 3.7 67 – 69 6. The results of the examination shall be published in a B+ 3.3 63 – 66 separate pass list in which the names of the successful B 3.0 60 – 62 candidates shall be arranged alphabetically as follows:- B- 2.7 57 – 59 i. Distinction C+ 2.3 53 – 56 ii. Honours C 2.0 50 – 52 iii. Pass C- 1.7 47 – 49 D+ 1.3 43 – 46 D 1.0 40 – 42 F 0.0 Less than 4020
  • 21. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESOral Examination for student PrizesDiploma Students The following prizes are awarded to students in the Faculty of11. Oral examinations are available to Diploma students under Social Sciences each year:- the same regulations that govern such examinations in the undergraduate programme EXCEPT that only ONE (1) Oral Campus Faculty Prizes Supplemental will be offered to Diploma students who fail i. A First Year Faculty prize of books is awarded to the Level I with a mark of 35% - 39%. student with the best academic performance Second Year Faculty prize of books is awarded to the Level II student withAward of the Diploma the best academic performance.12. The report of the examiners and the pass list shall be laid ii A Silver Gilt medal is awarded to the Level III (Final) year student before the Senate for approval. with the best academic performance.General Regulations for Certificate Cross-Campus Faculty Prizes i. Three prizes of books are awarded to students obtaining theProgrammes highest marks at the Level I Social Sciences examinations onEvening University Study each campus.1. An evening student shall normally complete the Certificate Programme in not more than three (3) consecutive Charles M. Kennedy Prize semesters, ie. two (2) semesters and one (1) summer school ii. One cash prize is awarded to the student with the highest marks session. in the B.Sc. (Economics) degree in all courses taken at the Levels II and III examinations.2. An evening student whose GPA for a given semester is less than or equal to 0.75 shall be deemed to be performing unsatisfactorily, and shall be placed on warning. An evening Hugh Springer Prize student on warning whose GPA for the succeeding semester iii. One prize, half the value of which is for books, is awarded to is less than 0.75 will be required to withdraw. the most distinguished Final Year student in the Faculties of Humanities and Education and the Faculty of Social Sciences3. An evening student shall normally register for a maximum who have completed Levels II and III examinations. of ten (10) courses per year/ four (4) courses per semester and two (2) courses in the summer school session. George Wadinambiaratchi Prize vi. This prize consists of a plaque and a cheque in the amountOral Examination for Certificate Students of TT$2,500 and is awarded to the student graduating at4. Oral examinations are available to students in this the top of the class in the B.Sc. Management Studies special programme under the same regulations that govern such programme. examinations in the undergraduate programme EXCEPT that only ONE (1) Oral Supplemental will be offered to Certificate students who fail with a mark of 35% - 39%.Award of the Certificate5. In order to be awarded a Certificate, candidates must complete thirty (30) credits, (equivalent to ten (10) semester courses), and have satisfied the Examiners for the award of the Certificate. The report of the examiners and the pass list shall be laid before the Senate for approval. 21
  • 22. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESTime to start thinking about … M.Sc. Programmes These are also referred to as “Taught” as opposed to “Research”Postgraduate studies in the programmes. To be admitted to the prescribed course of study for the M.Sc., candidates mustFaculty of Social Sciences i. hold a bachelor’s degree from an approved university. ii. normally the class of degree should be at least lower secondBefore you select your programme of study or your courses for class honours.the year, consider whether or not you would like to proceed to iii. in some programmes, practical experience or otherthe postgraduate level after graduation. In most professions a qualifications of special relevance to the course programmeBachelor’s degree is only the first step in the learning process may be required.that you should continue throughout your professional career. iv. in some programmes, applicants may have to write an entrance examination or may have to do qualifying courses.However, your choices at the undergraduate level can affect in the latter instance, that student will be deemed to be ayour postgraduate options. This brief guide provides you with qualifying student.basic Information on the Faculty’s current graduate programme,our research areas and any undergraduate requirements or M.Phil./Ph.D. Programmesprerequisites. For more detailed information and advice, please The Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) and the Doctor of Philosophyconsult the Postgraduate Information Guide and speak with (Ph.D.) degrees are research degrees. Research degrees involveyour Academic Advisor. independent study, directed by a supervisor, and the production of a thesis. The essential difference between the Master andAbout Postgraduate Study Doctoral levels, aside from the length of the registration period,The Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of the West lies in the quality of a successful Ph.D. thesis, which must beIndies offers 4 Diploma programmes, 14 MSc programmes, judged to be the result of original research, to be an addition to10 MPhil programmes and 8 PhD programmes. Our Diploma knowledge and to be worthy of publication either in full or in anand taught Masters programmes (eg. MSc ) are particularly abridged form in a refereed journal.well suited to those who have already embarked upon theirprofessional career and are looking to gain deeper insight into a The award of a Ph.D. also requires the candidate to defend his/specialised area In their field. Our research programmes (MPhil her thesis at a public oral examination. Many research degreesand PhD) allow students to follow their passion and provide now contain a taught element. The intention of these taughtthe opportunity, resources and support for you to develop your courses is to provide students with research techniques andown innovative ideas and approaches to the problems facing skills that will not only help them to complete their currentthe Caribbean and the world today. research topic, but will also stand them in good stead for life after University. Students will be considered for the M.Phil./Ph.D. programmesDefinitions and Admission Requirements having satisfied the criteria set below:Below are brief descriptions of the different types of programmes i Candidates seeking entry to the M.Phil. programme shouldoffered by the Faculty and the general admission requirements. hold a Bachelor’s degree (Second Class Honours or above)Please consult the Postgraduate Information Guide for more in the area in which they wish to pursue.detailed information. ii. Candidates seeking entry into the Ph.D. programmes should hold Master’s degree from an approved University with aPostgraduate Diplomas - These programmes involve specialty in the area of study.a mix of taught classes, examinations, coursework and a written iii. Students may be required to attend an interview prior topaper. The duration is generally one year for full-time study and being accepted.two years for part-time study. To be admitted to the prescribed iv. Students applying for M.Phil. or Ph.D. degrees must preparecourse of study for the Postgraduate Diploma, candidates must an appropriate research proposal for consideration.i. hold a bachelor’s degree from an approved university.ii. normally the class of degree should be at least lower second class honours.iii. in some programmes, practical experience or other qualifications of special relevance to the course programme may be required.iv. in some programmes, applicants may have to write an entrance examination.22
  • 23. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESPostgraduate Programmes 2008-2009Postgraduate programmes offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences in the current academic year are as follows: Diploma MSc MPhil PhDEconomics • • • •International Relations •(ft/pt) • • •Human Resource Management • • Mediation Studies* •(ft/pt) • Criminology and Criminal Justice • • •Government • • •Management Studies • • •Sociology • • •Social Work • • •Aviation Management • Marketing • Master of Business Administration (for Executives) • Master in Business Administration (International) • Public Sector Management •(pt) Psychology • • Programmes offered by the Centre For Gender and Development Studies (CGDS) Diploma MSc MPhil PhDGender & Development ** • • Interdisciplinary Gender Studies*** •(ft) •(ft) Programmes offered by the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute Of Social & Economic Studies (SALISES)NOTE: the following MSc programmes are delivered only at the Mona Campus with the exceptionof the MSc in Development Statistics. Diploma MSc MPhil PhDEconomic Development Policy • • •Development Statistics o • •Governance • • •Social Policy • • •Admission Requirements:* Mediation Studies: Preference will be given, in the first instance, to people with work experience in the field of mediation. Competence in Social Work, Law, Business, Politics, Probation, Corrections, Psychology, Human Resource Management and Communication would be a distinct advantage.** Gender and Development: First Degree with at least 2nd Class Honours or its equivalent (GPA 3.5). Preference will be given to students with some prior training in gender studies. This could include the UWI Minor in Gender and Development or Gender Studies or its equivalent or at least three (3) relevant qualifying courses chosen from the following:• GEND2203 Feminist Theoretical Frameworks• GEND 2013 Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean• SOCI 3039 Gender and Development with reference to the Caribbean• SOCI 3031 Sex, Gender and Society: Sociological Perspectives• SOCI 3038 Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender in the Anglophone Caribbean• GEND 3260 Gender and Science• GEND 3501 The Philosophy of Gender• GEND 3502 The Philosophy of Gender in Caribbean Thought• GEND 3001 Gender, Violence and Trauma in Discourse OR• UWI Diploma in Gender and Development plus Associate Degree or equivalent tertiary level diploma and extensive working experience in a related field; 23
  • 24. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES*** Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: A recognized B.Sc or B.A. with a minimum of upper second class honours or a 3.50 GPA or M.A./ M.Sc from UWI or any other recognized tertiary institution; or satisfactory completion of specified in qualifying courses as required from among the following:• GEND2203 Feminist Theoretical Frameworks• GEND 2013 Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean• SOCI 3039 Gender and Development with reference to the Caribbean• SOCI 3031 Sex, Gender and Society: Sociological Perspectives• SOCI 3038 Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender in the Anglophone Caribbean• GEND 3260 Gender and Science• GEND 3051 The Philosophy of Gender• GEND 3052 The Philosophy of Gender in Caribbean ThoughtFor More Information and AdviceFIRSTRequest the 2008-2009 Faculty of Social Sciences Postgraduate Information Guide ORdownload the guide from the UWI St. Augustine website.THENContact any of the following persons for an appointment:Dean’s Office -Mrs. Vidiya Mahabir-Ramlakhan - ext. 2672Mrs. Karen Harrison - ext. 2673.Department of Behavioural Sciences –Ms. Michylle Arthur - ext. 3234Department of Economics –Mrs. Avril Patterson-Pierre - ext. 2018Department of Management Studies –Ms. Patsy Marcano - ext. 329724
  • 25. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCourse LISTING for B.Sc. Programmes: Specials, Majors, MinorsSpecialsB.Sc. Accounting SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management or 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IIEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IILevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 IMS23B (MGMT 2011) Caribbean Business Environment 3 IIMS23C (MGMT 2012) Quantitative Methods 3 IMS25A (ACCT 2014) Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 IMS25B (ACCT 2015) Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 IIMS25H (ACCT 2021) Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IMS26A (MGMT 2032) Managerial Economics 3 IIMS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3 I & IIMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS31B (MGMT 3011) Management Information Systems II 3 IMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy and Policy 3 I & IIMS35F (ACCT 3041) Advanced Accounting 3 IMS35J (ACCT 3040) Accounting Theory 3 IIMS35K (ACCT 3039) Advanced Management Accounting 3 IIMS36B (ACCT 3043) Auditing I 3 IMS37B (MGMT 3046) Company Law 3 IMS38E (MGMT 3051) Taxation I 3 IIMS38H (MGMT 3048) Financial Management II 3 IPLUS: Three (3) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. one (1) additional Level II/III courseB.Sc. Banking & Finance Special(Offered in Evening University only)Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management or 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS13A (MGMT 1022) Introduction to Banking 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II 25
  • 26. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 IMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 IMS23C (MGMT 2012) Quantitative Methods 3 IMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS28E (MGMT 2024) Money and Capital Markets 3 IIMS24B (MGMT 2030) Banking Law 3 IMS24C (MGMT 2031) Banking Risk Management 3 IIEC20A (ECON 2000) Intermediate Microeconomics I 3 IEC21A (ECON 2002) Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3 ILevel IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS34D (MGMT 3079) Advanced Banking Law 3 Not OfferedMS34E (MGMT 3080) Bank Treasury Management 3 Not OfferedMS34G (MGMT 3081) Credit Analysis and Lending 3 Not OfferedMS33K (MGMT 3035) Ethics in Business 3 I & IIMS38D (MGMT 3050) Investment and Analysis 3 IIMS38H (MGMT 3048) Financial Management II 3 IMS38N (MGMT 3053) International Financial Management 3 IIEC31E (ECON 3005) Monetary Theory and Policy 3 IPLUS: Nine (9) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. three (3) additional Level II/III coursesB.Sc. Economics SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Six (6) additional Level I course credits i.e. two (2) additional Level I coursesLevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterEC20A (ECON 2000) Intermediate Microeconomics I 3 IEC20B (ECON 2001) Intermediate Microeconomics II 3 IIEC21A (ECON 2002) Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3 IEC21B (ECON 2003) Intermediate Macroeconomics II 3 IIEC23J (ECON 2006) Economic Statistics 3 IEC23E (ECON 2005) Social and Economic Accounting 3 IIEC25F (ECON 2020) Caribbean Economy 3 IIEC24B (ECON 2015) Mathematical Methods in Economics I 3 IEC30B (ECON 3052) Fiscal Policy and Economic Development 3 IIEC30N (ECON 3006) International Trade and Policy 3 IEC36C (ECON 3049) Econometrics I 3 IEC33B (ECON 3007) International Monetary and Financial Theory 3 IIPLUS: Three (3) additional Level III EC courses OR Two (2) additional Level III EC courses and one (1) additional Level II EC coursePLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. five (5) additional Level II/III coursesNote: EC36D (ECON 3050) is highly recommended26
  • 27. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESB.Sc. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3 IGT11D (GOVT 1001) Introduction to Politics II 3 II EC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 II(SOCI 1005) Introductory Statistics for Behavioural Sciences 3 IFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II PLUS: Six (6) additional Level I course credits i.e. two (2) additional Level I coursesLevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT38A (GOVT 3053) Introduction to International Politics 3 IGT38B (GOVT 3054) Introduction to International Relations in the Caribbean 3 IIGT24A (GOVT 2060) International Relations: Theories and Approaches 3 IGT27M (GOVT 2049) International Political Economy 3 IGT25M (GOVT 2061) Principles of Public International Law 3 II(GOVT 2062) International Security 3 II(GOVT 2063) Cyber Politics 3 IGT37M (GOVT 3052) Contemporary Issues in International Relations 3 IGT38M (GOVT 3055) Theories and Practices of International Negotiations 3 IGT30A (GOVT 3046) International Organizations 3 IGT36M (GOVT 3066) International Law and Development 3 IGT30B (GOVT 3047) International Financial Organisation 3 IIGT31C (GOVT 3003) Foreign Policy in the Third World 3 II(GOVT 3065) Religion and World Politics 3 II(GOVT 3067) CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME): Internal and External Relations 3 IIPLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. five (5) additional level II/III coursesB.Sc. Management Studies SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management or 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II 27
  • 28. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 I &IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS23B (MGMT 2011) Caribbean Business Environment 3 IIMS23C (MGMT 2012) Quantitative Methods 3 IMS25C (ACCT 2017) Management Accounting 3 IMS26A (MGMT 2032) Managerial Economics 3 IIMS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3 I & IIMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS30A (MKTG 3000) Marketing Management 3 IMS31B (MGMT 3011) Management Information Systems II 3 IMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 IMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy and Policy 3 I & IIMS34B (MGMT 3037) International Business Management 3 IIMS39M (MGMT 3057) Production and Operations Management 3 IIPLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. five (5) additional Level II/III courses.Note: Students offering EC20A (ECON 2000) and /or EC20B (ECON 2001) for credit will not be allowed to offer MS26A (MGMT 2032) for credit. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC23J (ECON 2006) and MS23C (MGMT 2012) for credit. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC25F (ECON 2020) and MS23B (MGMT 2011) for credit.B.Sc. Psychology Special(Not offered in the Evening University)Level 1Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I OR 3 I SY13F (SOCI 1000) Introduction to Sociology II 3 II PS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3 I PS11B (PSYC 1004) Introduction to Social Psychology 3 II EC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics OR 3 IISOCI 1005 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences 3 I FD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & II FD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & II FD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IILevel II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterPS24A (PSYC 2004) Personality Theory 3 I PS24B (PSYC 2010) Statistics and Research Design in Psychology 3 I PS24C (PSYC 2003) Physiological Psychology 3 II PS24D (PSYC 2011) Selected Theories in Social Psychology 3 I PS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology 3 I PS24F (PSYC 2002) Abnormal and Clinical Psychology 3 II PS320 (PSYC 3025) Research Projects in Psychology 6 Year Long PS33F (PSYC 3023) Contemporary Issues in Social Psychology 3 I PS34A (PSYC 3004) Experimental and Applied Psychology 3 II In addition, the following five (5) courses:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterPS20C (PSYC 2016) Sensation and Perception 3 I PS20B (PSYC 2015) Introduction to Cognitive Psychology 3 IIPS30G (PSYC 3021) Motivation and Emotions 3 II PS30J (PSYC 3022) Learning and Memory 3 I PS34D (PSYC 3002) Advanced Topics in Personality OR 3 II PS30H (PSYC 3026) History and Systems in Psychology 3 I Plus: Nine (9) additional Level I course credits and fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits.28
  • 29. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESB.Sc. Public Sector Management SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3 IGT12C (GOVT 1006) Introduction to Public Administration 3 IGT19B (GOVT 1005) Introduction to Public Policy Analysis 3 IISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management 3 I FD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Three (3) additional Level I course credits i.e. one (1) additional Level I courseLevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT20A (GOVT 2051) Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations in the Public Sector 3 IGT20B (GOVT 2052) Public Sector Accounting 3 IIGT21P (GOVT 2030) Project Administration 3 IIGT29B (GOVT 2023) Issues in the Government and Politics of the West Indies 3 IIGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3 IGT29H (GOVT 2034) Human Resource Management in the Public Sector 3 IIGT37A (GOVT 3037) Public Administration 3 IGT37B (GOVT 3062) Comparative Public Administration 3 IIGT38B (GOVT 3054) Introduction to International Relations in the Caribbean 3 IIGT39E (GOVT 3021) Public Policy Analysis 3 IGT39K (GOVT 3023) Administrative Law I 3 IMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 IMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 IEC22A (ECON 3051) Topics in Economic Development 3 ISY23C (SOCI 2010) Anthropology of the Peoples of the Caribbean I 3 IPLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. five (5) additional Level II/III coursesRecommended Electives:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT32A (GOVT 3004) Scope and Methods in Political Analysis 3 I & IISY35C (SOCI 3020) Social Policy and Administration III 3 IIStudents who wish to read for a Minor in International Relations and are reading the B.Sc. in Public Sector Management Special willnot be allowed to count GT38B (GOVT 3054) for the Minor in International Relations and as such should read either GT28A (GOVT3019) or GOVT 2020 as its replacement.B.Sc. Social Work SpecialLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSOCI 1005 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences 3 I & IIPS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3 ISW17A (SOWK 1001) Introduction to Social Work 3 ISW17B (SOWK 1003) Theory and Practice of Social Work I 3 II SW18B (SOWK 1007) Law for Social Workers 3 IISW19C (SOWK 1010) Practicum I (168 Contact Hours) 3FD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II 29
  • 30. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESPLUS: Either SY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I OR 3 ISY13F (SOCI 1000) Introduction to Sociology II 3 IILevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSW27A (SOWK 2000) Theory and Practice of Social Work II 3 ISW27B (SOWK 2003) Theory and Practice of Social Work III 3 IISW290 (SOWK 2008) Practicum II and III 6 Year LongSW30A (SOWK 3009) Theory and Practice of Social Work IV 3 ISW30B (SOWK 3011) Theory and Practice of Social Work V 3 IISW31B (SOWK 3002) Family and Child Welfare 3 IISW350 (SOWK 3017) Practicum IV 6 Year Long SY25A (SOCI 2023) Social Policy and Administration I 3 IMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IISW32B (SOWK 3012) Group and Individual Counseling 3 IPS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology 3 IPS24F (PSYC 2002) Abnormal and Clinical Psychology 3 IISY22E (SOCI 2007) Survey Design and Analysis 3 IPLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. five (5) additional Level II/III coursesPreferred Electives:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSW31A (SOWK 3016) Residential Social Work 3 IISY23F (SOCI 2012) Social Change and Development 3 I SY23C (SOCI 2010) Anthropology of the Peoples of the Caribbean I 3 I SY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 3 IISY31C (SOCI 3005) Sociology of Health and Illness 3 IISY35B (SOCI 3019) Social Policy and Administration II 3 IThe Social Work Courses are designated for B.Sc. Social Work Special and MSW, M.Phil, Ph.D (Qualifying) ONLY with the followingexceptions:Course Code Course Title SOWK 1001 (SW17A) Introduction to Social WorkSOWK 2001 (SW18B) Law for Social WorkersSOWK 3002 (SW31B) Family and Child WelfareSOWK 3012 (SW32B) Group and Individual CounsellingSOWK 3016 (SW31A) Residential Social WorkMajorsB.Sc. Accounting MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management OR 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II30
  • 31. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS25H (ACCT2021) Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IMS25A (ACCT2014) Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 IMS25B (ACCT2015) Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 IIPLUS: Twenty one (21) additional approved Level II/III course credits i.e seven (7) additional Level II/IIILevel IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS35F (ACCT3041) Advanced Accounting 3 IMS31B (MGMT3011) Management Information Systems II 3 IMS36B (ACCT3043) Auditing I 3 I MS37B (MGMT3046) Company Law 3 IMS38E (MGMT3051) Taxation 3 IIMS35K (ACCT3039) Advanced Management Accounting 3 IIPLUS: One approved MS elective 3 I or IIPLUS: Nine (9) additional approved Level II/III course credits i.e. three (3) additional Level II/III coursesB.Sc. Economics MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 I & IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Six (6) additional Level I course credits i.e. two (2) additional Level I coursesLevels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterEC20A (ECON 2000) Intermediate Microeconomics I 3 IEC20B (ECON 2001) Intermediate Microeconomics II 3 IIEC21A (ECON 2002) Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3 IEC21B (ECON 2003) Intermediate Macroeconomics II 3 IIEC23J (ECON 2006) Economic Statistics 3 I PLUS: Five (5) additional Level II/III Economics courses at least two of which must be at Level IIIPLUS: Thirty (30) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. ten (10) additional Level II/III coursesNote:i. EC36C (ECON 3049) and EC36D (ECON 3050) are highly recommendedii. Students in the Economics special/major doing both M 25A (MATH 2140) and M 25B (MATH 2150) will be exempt from EC23J (ECON 2006) (which must be replaced by an elective EC level II/III course).iii. No student will receive credit for EC23J (ECON 2006) if he/she is at the same time receiving credit for M 25A (MATH 2140) and/or M 25B (MATH 2150).iv. Students offering EC20A (ECON 2000) and /or EC20B (ECON 2001) for credit will not be allowed to offer MS26A (MGMT 2032) for credit.v. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC23J (ECON 2006) and MS23C (MGMT 2012) for credit.vi. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC25F (ECON 2020) and MS23B (MGMT 2011) for credit. 31
  • 32. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESB.Sc. Government MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3 IGT11D (GOVT 1001) Introduction to Politics II 3 II GT19B (GOVT 1005) Introduction to Public Policy Analysis 3 IIGT12C (GOVT 1006) Introduction to Public Administration 3 I(SOCI 1005) Introductory Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Fifteen (15) additional Level I course credits.Levels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT27B (GOVT 2015) Modern Political Thought 3 IIGT28A (GOVT 2019) Comparative Politics 3 IGT29B (GOVT 2023) Issues in the Government and Politics of the West Indies 3 IIGT32A (GOVT 3004) Scope and Methods in Political Analysis 3 IGT37A (GOVT 3037) Public Administration 3 IGT38A (GOVT 3053) Introduction to International Politics 3 IGT38B (GOVT 3054) Introduction to International Relations in the Caribbean 3 IIGT38C (GOVT 3019) Latin American Government, Politics and Development 3 IGT39E (GOVT 3021) Public Policy Analysis 3 IGT39K (GOVT 3023) Administrative Law I 3 IPLUS: Thirty (30) additional Level II/III course credits i.e. ten (10) additional Level II/III coursesNote: The courses GT38A (GOVT 3053) and GT38B (GOVT 3054) are core courses to both the B.Sc. (Government) Major and the Minor inInternational Relations. As such, B.Sc. (Government) major students, in addition to pursuing GT30A (GOVT 3046), GT30B (GOVT 3047)and GT31C (GOVT 3003), will be required to pursue the two (2) of the courses listed below in order to qualify for Minor in InternationalRelations:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT31A (GOVT 3001) Third World Political Thought 3 IORGT38D (GOVT 3020) Power and Politics in Latin America 3 IIORGT24A (GOVT 2060) International Relations: Themes and Approaches 3 I B.Sc. Hospitality and Tourism Management Major (Hospitality Option) Year IIISemester: ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS23C (MGMT 2012) Quantitative Methods 3 IMS20D (MGMT 2029) Contemporary Hospitality and Tourism Trends 3 IHM30B (HOTL 3001) Meetings & Conventions Management 3 IFD 10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIYear IIISemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS26A (MGMT 2032) Managerial Economics 3 IIMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIHM22A (HOTL 2010) Cruise Line Operations & Management 3 IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization OR 3 I & IIFD 12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II32
  • 33. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESYear IVSemester ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 ITR31A (TOUR 3003) Integrated Service Management 3 IHM30A (HOTL 3000) Resort Planning & Development 3 IElective Two (2) Electives 6Year IVSemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy and Policy 3 I & IIMS30D (MKTG 3007) Marketing Planning 3 IIMS33C (MGMT 3032) Entrepreneurial Studies 3 II HM33B (HOTL 3004) Hospitality & Tourism Research Project 3 II MS32B (MGMT 3018) Industrial Relations 3 IIRecommended Electives:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterTR32B (TOUR 3008) Tourism Impact Analysis 3TR21C (TOUR 2005) Transportation and Travel 3 ITR31B (TOUR 3004) Tourism Destination Marketing 3 ITR31C (TOUR 3005) Tourism Planning and Development 3 IAM33D (AGBU 3003) Introduction to Ecotourism 3 IIMS21E (MGMT 2007) Introduction to E-Commerce 3 IMS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3 I & IIMS34C (MGMT 3062) Compensation Management 3 IIMS32H (MGMT 3024) Business Communication 3 I & IIMS32K (MGMT 3025 Human Resource Development 3 IIMS33K (MGMT 3035) Ethics in Business 3 I & IINote: Any student who completed Resort Planning at TTHTI will not be allowed to register for HOTL 3000 Resort Planning andDevelopment.Languages: Any foreign language being offered by Centre for Language and Learning (CLL) (not for credit)Seminar: Advanced Professional Seminar in Hospitality and Tourism ManagementAny other course(s) offered by any other department(s) and approved by the Head, Department of Management Studies and theHead of the other department(s) concerned.B.Sc. Hospitality and Tourism Management Major (Tourism Option)Year IIISemester ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS23C (MGMT 2012) Quantitative Methods 3 IMS20D (MGMT 2029) Contemporary Hospitality and Tourism Trends 3 IMS30C (MKTG 3002) Marketing Research 3 IFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIYear IIISemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS26A (MGMT 2032) Managerial Economics 3 IIMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IITR21C (TOUR 2005) Transportation and Travel 3 IFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization OR 3 I & IIFD 12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II 33
  • 34. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESYear IVSemester ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 ITR31A (TOUR 3003) Integrated Service Management 3 ITR31C (TOUR 3005) Tourism Planning and Development 3 IElective Two (2) Electives 6Year IVSemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy and Policy 3 I & IIMS30D (MKTG 3007) Marketing Planning 3 IIMS33C (MGMT 3032) Entrepreneurial Studies 3 IITR31B (TOUR 3004) Tourism Destination Marketing 3 IMS32B (MGMT 3018) Industrial Relations 3 IIRecommended Electives:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterTR32B (TOUR 3008) Tourism Impact Analysis 3 IITR21C (TOUR 2005) Transportation and Travel 3 IITR31B (TOUR 3004) Tourism Destination Marketing 3 IIHM22A (HOTL 2010) Cruise Line Operations and Management 3 IIHM33B (HOTL 3004) Hospitality and Tourism Research Project 3 IIHM30A (HOTL 3000) Resort Planning and Development 3 IHM30B (HOTL 3001) Meetings and Convention Management 3 IAM33D (AGBU 3003) Introduction to Ecotourism 3 II MS21E (MGMT 2007) Introduction to E-Commerce 3 IMS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3 I & IIMS34C (MGMT 3062) Compensation Management 3 IIMS32H (MGMT 3024) Business Communication 3 I & IIMS32K (MGMT 3025 Human Resource Development 3 IIMS33K (MGMT 3035) Ethics in Business 3 I & IINote: Any student who completed Resort Planning at TTHTI will not be allowed to register for HOTL 3000 Resort Planning andDevelopment.Languages: Any foreign language being offered by Centre for Language and Learning (CLL) (not for credit)Any other course(s) offered by any other department(s) and approved by the Head, Department of Management Studies and theHead of the other department(s) concerned.B.Sc. International Tourism Management MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 ITOUR 1001 Introduction to International Tourism 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & II34
  • 35. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 I & II MS22A (MGMT 2008) Organisational Behaviour 3 I & IIHM30B (HOTL 3001) Meetings & Convention Mgmt 3 IMS20D (MGMT 2029) Contemporary Hospitality & Tourism Trends 3 IMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIAM33D (AGBU 3003) Introduction to Ecotourism 3 IITR21C (TOUR 2005) Transportation & Travel 3 IPLUS : Two (2) additional Level II/III coursesLevel IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 IMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy & Policy 3 I & IITR31C (TOUR 3005) Tourism Planning & Policy Development 3 ITR31A (TOUR 3003) Integrated Service Management 3 IMS26A (MGMT 2032) Managerial Economics 3 IITR31B (TOUR 3004) Tourism Destination Marketing 3 IHM33B (HOTL 3004) Hospitality & Tourism Research Project 3 IITR32B (TOUR 3008) Tourism Impact Analysis 3 IIPLUS : Two (2) additional Level II/III coursesNote:1. LANG 0100 - Language Requirement: It is compulsory for all students to complete Level one (1) in any foreign language being offered by Centre for Language and Learning (CLL). This is a departmental requirement with no credits attached2. TOUR 3088- Internship: It is compulsory for all students to complete a six (6) month internship at the end of the final semester of this degree program. This is a departmental requirement with no credits attachedB.SC. LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT(Evening University Only)Level ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management 3 IMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3 IPS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3 I(HIST 1001) The Caribbean World to C.1660 3 I(COMS 1101) Communication Skills 3 IThree foundation courses from the following:FD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIFD13A (FOUN 1301) Law, Governance, Economy and Society 3 I & IIPLUS: A co-curricular 3-credit programme on Armed Forces and (i) A Management/Leadership Seminar (ii) Spanish Language (not for credit) 35
  • 36. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel II (i) Eight core courses in Leadership and Management and (ii) Two electives that would inform the student’s choice of option at Level IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT39K (GOVT 3023) Administrative Law I 3 IGT20C (GOVT 2053) Introduction to Public Information Systems 3 IEitherGT29H (GOVT 2034) Public Sector Human Resource Management OR 3 IGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3 IMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 IGT28B (GOVT 2020) Government and Politics an a Selected Region 3 IGT38A (GOVT 3053) Introduction to International Politics 3 IGT32C (GOVT 3006) Political Sociology 3(ENGR 3001) Natural Hazards & Disaster Management in the Caribbean 3PLUS: Two Electives*Electives will comprise Level I courses in the option selected for Level III options from either Engineering, or Humanities andEducation, or Science & Agriculture and Medicine or Social Sciences.Level III Students would be required to select an option from EITHER Social Sciences OR Engineering OR Humanities and Education OR Science, Agriculture and Medicine.Level III options must comprise• EITHER one major in the subject area, OR• two minors in the subject area, OR• one minor AND five electives in the subject area• OR ten courses to be selected from Levels I, II and III of the subject area by consultation with the Faculty student advisor.Level III OptionsOption 1 – Engineering & Operations(This option was designed specifically for Defence Force Personnel)Semester I – 10 CreditsCVNG 1003: Construction Techniques CVNG 1005: Science of Materials B MENG 1005: Workshop Technology MENG 1000: Engineering Graphics Semester II – 14 CreditsCHNG 2005: Plant & Safety Engineering SURV 2004: Surveying for Civil Engineers SURV 2001: Elements of GIS IENG 2004: Industrial Database & Design IENG 2003: Engineering Economics & Financial Management Semester III – 9 CreditsIENG 3016: Applied Project Management IENG 3000: Industrial Management IENG 3001: Production Planning & Control AND either one additional course taken from level II or III in the subject area OR an approved ProjectOption II - Humanities and Education• EITHER one major in the subject area, OR• two minors in the subject area, OR• one minor AND five electives in the subject area• OR ten courses taken from Levels II and III of the subject area by consultation with the Faculty student advisor.36
  • 37. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESMajors Communication Studies History Latin American Studies Spanish Festival ArtsMinors Communication Studies Cultural Studies History Music Spanish Festival ArtsOption III - Science, Agriculture and Medicine• EITHER one major in the subject area, OR• two minors in the subject area, OR• one minor AND five electives in the subject area• OR ten courses taken from Levels II and III of the subject area by consultation with the Faculty student advisor.Majors Mathematics Physics Chemistry Computer Science Biology Nutritional Sciences Environment and Natural Resource ManagementMinors Mathematics Statistics Computer Science Entrepreneurship Chemistry Biotechnology Biology Environmental and Natural Resource Management Environmental Biology Electronics Material Science Environmental Physics Food and Food Service Management Family and Consumer Sciences Zoology Botany Marine Biology Sport NutritionOption IV - Social Sciences• EITHER one major in the subject area, OR• two minors in the subject area, OR• one minor AND five electives in the subject area• OR ten courses taken from Levels II and III of the subject area by consultation with the Faculty student advisor. 37
  • 38. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESMajor Management StudiesMinors Finance Government Human Resource Management International Relations Management Studies Management Information Systems Marketing Public Sector Management Psychology Sociology Social Policy Administration Social Policy Social Psychology Sports ManagementB.SC. MANAGEMENT STUDIES MAJORLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management or 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics I 3 IEC10F (ECON 1002) Introduction to Economics II 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IILevels II/IIISemesterCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 I & IIMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 IMS33B (MGMT 3031) Business Strategy and Policy 3 I & IIPLUS: Four (4) elective MS courses drawn from Levels II or IIIPLUS: Thirty (30) additional Level II/III course creditsNote: i. Students offering EC20A (ECON 2000) and /or EC20B (ECON 2001) for credit will not be allowed to offer MS26A (MGMT 2032) for credit.ii. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC23J (ECON 2006) and MS23C (MGMT 2012) for credit.iii. Students cannot simultaneously offer EC25F (ECON 2020) and MS23B (MGMT 2011)for credit.38
  • 39. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESB.Sc. Psychology MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I OR 3 ISY13F (SOCI 1000) Introduction to Sociology II 3 IIPS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3 IPS11B (PSYC 1004) Introduction to Social Psychology 3 IIEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics OR 3 IISOCI 1005 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences 3 IFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Nine (9) additional Level I course credits.Levels II/IIISemesterCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterPS24A (PSYC 2004) Personality Theory 3 IPS24B (PSYC 2010) Statistics and Research Design in Psychology 3 IPS24C (PSYC 2003) Physiological Psychology 3 IIPS24D (PSYC 2011) Selected Theories in Social Psychology 3 I PS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology 3 I PS24F (PSYC 2002) Abnormal and Clinical Psychology 3 IIPS320 (PSYC 3025) Research Project in Psychology 6 Year LongPS33F (PSYC 3023) Contemporary Issues in Social Psychology 3 IPS34A (PSYC 3004) Experimental and Applied Psychology 3 IIPLUS: Thirty (30) additional Level II/III course creditsB.Sc. Sociology MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 ISY13F (SOCI 1000) Introduction to Sociology II 3 IISOCI 1005 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences 3 I & IIFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medication and Technology in Society 3 I & IIPLUS: Twelve (12) additional Level I course credits.Levels II/IIICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY20E (SOCI 2000) Classical Social Theory 3 ISY20F (SOCI 2001) Modern Social Theory 3 IISY22E (SOCI 2007) Survey Design and Analysis 3 ISY22F (SOCI 2006) Qualitative Methods in Sociological Research 3 IISY23C (SOCI 2010) Anthropology of the Peoples of the Caribbean I 3 ISY23D (SOCI 2011) Anthropology of the Peoples of the Caribbean II 3 IISY23F (SOCI 2012) Social Change and Development 3 ISY31F (SOCI 3006) The Third World in Global Development 3 IISY32E (SOCI 3008) Industrial Sociology I: Theory and Methods 3 IISY36E (SOCI 3028) Caribbean Social Structure I 3 IPLUS: Thirty (30) additional Level II/III course credits 39
  • 40. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESB.Sc. Sports Management MajorLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management OR 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology I 3 IMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Managerial Accounting 3 IIEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 IIEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 IEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics 1 3 IFD10A (FOUN 1001) English for Academic Purposes 3 I & IIFD12A (FOUN 1201) Science, Medicine and Technology in Society 3 I & IIFD11A (FOUN 1101) Caribbean Civilization 3 I & IIPLUS: One (1) Elective chosen from Level I courses.Level IISemester ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS22G (MGMT 2009) Sociology of Sport 3 IMS22M (MGMT 2010) Introduction to Sports Management 3 ILevel IISemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS27E (MGMT 2022) The Law and Sport 3 IIMS28G (MGMT 2025) Fiscal Management in Sport 3 IIPLUS: Eighteen (18) additional Level II/III course creditsLevel IIISemester ICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS33K (MGMT 3035) Ethics in Business 3 I & IIMS32P (MGMT 3028) Physical Resource Management in Sport/ Facility Planning and Management 3 IMS32M (MGMT 3026) Human Resources Management in Sports 3 IOne (1) Elective*Level IIISemester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS32N (MGMT 3027) Sports Marketing and Public Relations 3 IIMS32R (MGMT 3029) Internship in Sport 3 IIPLUS: Twelve (12) additional Level II/III course credits* The elective may be taken in Semester II of Level III depending on the course to be selected, drawn from among those listed below.It is to be noted that all the following electives may not be offered in a given year. Thus the approval of the Head of the Department isrequired before signing for the elective.Recommended Electives:LevelCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS30C (MKTG 3002) Marketing Research 3 IMS39M (MGMT 3057) Production and Operations Management 3 IMS30M (MKTG 3010) Integrated Marketing Communication 3 IEC64B Applied Microeconomics (Sport)SP42A Issues and Values in Sport and Physical Education 40
  • 41. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESMinorsAccounting MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS25A (ACCT 2014) Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 IMS25B (ACCT 2015) Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 IIMS28D (MGMT 2023) Financial Management I 3 I & IIPLUS: Two (2) additional MS Level II/III coursesCRIMINOLOGY MINORCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT23B (GOVT 2011) Criminal Justice Systems 3 I SY37C (SOCI 3030) Sociology of Penal Practice 3 I SY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 3 IISY39B (SOCI 3036) Police and Society 3 IIPLUS: One (1) of the following:SY22E (SOCI 2007) Survey Design and Analysis 3 ISY22F (SOCI 2006) Qualitative Methods 3 IINote: Where any course is already counted for another major, special or minor, the student is required to select another Level II/IIIelective in order to qualify for a minor in CriminologyEconomics MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterEC20A (ECON 2000) Intermediate Microeconomics I 3 IEC21A (ECON 2002) Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3 IPLUS: Three (3) other Level II/III EC courses at least one of which should be at Level III.Finance MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS28E (MGMT 2024) Money and Capital Markets 3 IIMS38H (MGMT 3048) Financial Management II 3 IMS38L (MGMT 3055) Applied Topics in Corporate Finance 3 IPLUS: One (1) of:MS38D (MGMT 3050) Investment and Analysis 3 II MS38M (MGMT 3054) Capital Budgeting 3 Not OfferedMS38N (MGMT 3053) International Financial Management 3 IIPLUS: One (1) Management Studies Elective 3 41
  • 42. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESGender and Development Studies MinorThis minor is now being offered in the Faculty of Social Sciences. Fifteen (15) credits are available for this minor – three (3) corecourses and two (2) elective courses. The introductory course (AR11C)(GEND 1103): Introduction to Women’s Studies, although nota required course is highly recommended for persons wishing to do this minor. The required courses are:LevelSemesterCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterAR22C (GEND 2203) Feminist Theoretical Frameworks 3 ISY27D (SOCI 2016) Gender and Development: with reference to Caribbean Society 3 ISY37G (SOCI 3031) Sex, Gender and Society: Sociological Perspectives 3 II PLUS: Two (2) electives chosen from the following courses:SOCI 3038 Gender, Race and Class: Issues of Identity, Nation and Citizenship 3 IIGEND 3051 Gender and Philosophy I 3 IGEND 3052 Gender and Philosophy II 3 IIAX39A (AGEX 3003) Gender Issues in Agriculture 3 INS21B (GEND 3260) Gender and Science 3 IIH30C (HIST 3003) Women & Gender in the History of the English-speaking Caribbean 3 ISY35C (SOCI 3020) Social Policy and Administration III 3 IIL25A (LING 2501) Language, Gender and Sex 3 IAR20M (GEND 2013) Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean 3 IIOr any other approved courses. Please note that all courses may not be offered in any given year.Government MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT37A (GOVT 3037) Public Administration 3 IGT39E (GOVT 3021) Public Policy Analysis 3 IGT29B (GOVT 2023) Issues in Government and Politics of the West Indies OR 3 IIGT38C (GOVT 3019) Latin American Government, Politics and Development 3 IGT38A (GOVT 3053) Introduction to International Politics OR 3 IGT38B (GOVT 3054) Introduction to International Relations in the Caribbean 3 IIPLUS: One (1) of:GT27B (GOVT 2015) Modern Political Thought 3 IIGT28A (GOVT 2019) Comparative Politics 3 IGT39K (GOVT 3023) Administrative Law I 3 IHuman Resource Management MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS32A (MGMT 3017) Human Resource Management 3 IMS34C (MGMT 3062) Compensation Management 3 IIPLUS: Two (2) MS Level II/III courses 6International Relations MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT24A (GOVT 2060) International Relations: Theories & Approaches 3 IGT30A (GOVT 3046) International Organizations OR 3 IGT30B (GOVT 3047) International Financial Organizations 3 II GT38A (GOVT 3053) Introduction to International Politics 3 IGT38B (GOVT 3054) Introduction to International Relations in the Caribbean 3 IIGT31C (GOVT 3003) Foreign Policy in the Third World 3 IIManagement Information Systems MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIMS31B (MGMT 3011) Management Information Systems II 3 IMS31D (MGMT 3013) Database Design and Business Application 3 IIPLUS: Two (2) MS Level II/III courses 642
  • 43. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESManagement Studies MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 I & IIMS21B (MGMT 2006) Management Information Systems I 3 I & IIMS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3 I & IIMS25C (ACCT 2017) Management Accounting 3 IPLUS: One (1) MS Level III course 3Marketing MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS20A (MGMT 2003) Principles of Marketing 3 I & IIMS30A (MKTG 3000) Marketing Management 3 IMS30D (MKTG 3007) Marketing Planning 3 IIPLUS: Two (2) MS Level II/III courses 6Public Sector Management MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3 IGT29H (GOVT 2034) Human Resource Management in the Public Sector 3 IIGT39K (GOVT 3023) Administrative Law I 3 IEITHER GT37A (GOVT 3037) Public Administration OR 3 IGT37B (GOVT 3062) Comparative Public Administration 3 IIEITHER GT39E (GOVT 3021) Public Policy Analysis OR 3 IGT39F (GOVT 3035) Comparative Public Policy Analysis 3 IIPsychology MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterPS24A (PSYC 2004) Personality Theory 3 IPS24D (PSYC 2011) Selected Theories in Social Psychology 3 IPS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology OR 3 IPS24B (PSYC 2010) Statistics and Research Design in Psychology 3 IPS24F (PSYC 2002) Abnormal and Clinical Psychology OR 3 II PS24C (PSYC 2003) Physiological Psychology 3 IIPS33F (PSYC 3023) Contemporary Issues in Social Psychology OR 3 IPS34A (PSYC 3004) Experimental and Applied Psychology 3 IISocial Policy MinorAll students wishing to pursue a minor in Social Policy are required to do the following four (4) compulsory core courses at LevelsII and III.Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY25A (SOCI 2023) Social Policy and Administration I 3 ISY25B (SOCI 2015) Social Policy Organization and Administration 3 ISY35B (SOCI 3019) Social Policy and Administration II 3 ISY35C (SOCI 3020) Social Policy and Administration III 3 IIPLUS: One (1) of the following from Government, Sociology or Gender Studies for a total of fifteen (15) credits.Government coursesCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3 IGT39F (GOVT 3035) Comparative Public Policy 3 IIGT21P (GOVT 2030) Project Administration 3 II 43
  • 44. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESSociology coursesCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY21C (SOCI 2022) Social Gerontology 3 ISY30E (SOCI 3002) Sociology of Education I 3 ISY30F (SOCI 3003) Sociology of Education II 3 IISY31C (SOCI 3005) Sociology of Health and Illness 3 IISY35E (SOCI 3023) Population Studies I 3 ISY35F (SOCI 3037) Population Studies II 3 IISY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 3 IISY37C (SOCI 3030) Sociology of Penal Practice 3 II Gender Studies coursesCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits Semester(GENDER COURSES ARE OFFERED IN OTHER FACULTIES BUT ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES)AR11C (GEND1103) Introduction to Women’s Studies: Theoretical Concepts and Sources of Knowledge 3 1AR20M (GEND2013) Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean 3 IIAR22C (GEND2203) Feminist Theoretical Frameworks 3 1AX39A (AGEX 3003) Gender Issues in Agriculture 3 IGEND 3501 Philosophy of Gender 3 IGEND 3502 Philosophy of Gender in Caribbean Thought 3 IINS21B (GENS 3260) Gender and Science 4 IIH 30C (HIST3003) Women and Gender in the History of the English-Speaking Caribbean 3 ISY27D (SOCI 2016) Gender and Development: with reference to the Caribbean Society 3 1SY37G (SOCI3031) Sex, Gender and Society: Sociological Perspectives 3 1 SOCI 3038 Gender, Ethnicity and Class: Issues of Identity, Nation and Citizenship 3 IISocial Work coursesCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSW24A (SOWK 2007) Social Disability Studies 3 IINote: Where any course is already counted for another major, special or minor, the student is required to select another elective in order to qualify for a minor in Social Policy.Sociology MinorCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSY20E (SOCI 2000) Classical Social Theory 3 ISY23C (SOCI 2010) Anthropology of the Peoples of the Caribbean I 3 ISY23F (SOCI 2012) Social Change and Development 3 ISY36E (SOCI 3028) Caribbean Social Structure I 3 IPLUS: One (1) of the following:SY22E (SOCI 2007) Survey Design and Analysis 3 I SY30E (SOCI 3002) Sociology of Education I 3 ISY32E (SOCI 3008) Industrial Sociology I 3 IISY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 3 II44
  • 45. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESSports Management Minor1. Introduction The minor in Sports Management will be open to any student of the University entering Level II who has successfully completed the following courses or their equivalent.Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3 IMS15F (ACCT 1003) Introduction to Cost and Management Accounting 3 IIEither MS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management OR 3 ISY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology 3 IEC160 (ECON 1005) Introduction to Statistics 3 Year LongEC141 (ECON 1003) Introduction to Mathematics 3 Year LongEC10D (ECON 1001) Introduction to Economics 1 3 I 2. Programme Structure The minor comprises five (5) courses, each worth three (3) credits offered at Levels II and III as set out below:Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterMS22M (MGMT 2010) Introduction to Sport Management 3 IMS32M (MGMT 3026) Managing Human Resource in Sport 3 IMS32N (MGMT 3027) Sport Marketing and Public Relations 3 IIMS32P (MGMT 3028) Facility Planning and Management 3 IMS32R (MGMT 3029) Internship in Sport 3 IICourse LISTING for diploma programmesDiploma in Public Sector Management(Evening university and summer programme)Course Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics OR 3 SY13E (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Sociology 3 GT12C (GOVT 1006) Introduction to Public Administration 3 GT50A (GOVT 4000) Organizational Theory and Behaviour 3 GT52A (GOVT 4004) Administrative Law I 3 Semester IICourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterGT19B (GOVT 1005) Introduction to Public Policy Analysis 3 GT20B (GOVT 2052) Public Sector Accounting 3 GT21P (GOVT 2030) Project Administration 3 GT32A (GOVT 3004) Scope & Methods in Political Analysis 3Summer SemesterCourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3GT57C (GOVT 4014) Business and Society in the Caribbean 3 GT29H (GOVT 2034) Human Resource Management in the Public Sector 3 GT32A (GOVT 3004) Scope & Methods in Political Analysis 3 PLUS: One (1) Elective course chosen from Levels II or III courses in the Faculty of Social Sciences. 3 45
  • 46. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESDiploma in Caribbean Studies (“Summer” Programme Only)Course Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT56A (GOVT 4010) Literature and Society in the Caribbean 3GT56B (GOVT 4011) Sociology of the Caribbean 3GT56C (GOVT 4012) The Government and Politics of the Caribbean 3GT57A (GOVT 4013) Caribbean Economy 3GT57D (GOVT 4015) International Relations of the Caribbean 3GT57C (GOVT 4014) Business and Society in the Caribbean 3In addition, students will be required to complete a research paper (between 5,000 and 10,000 words in length). The topic shall beselected from the above-mentioned subject areas.Diploma in Security Administration (“Summer” Programme Only)FULL-TIME STUDYLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT52A (GOVT 4004) Administrative Law I 3CS13B (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Computing 3PS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3MS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3MS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3Level IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT52B (GOVT 4005) Administrative Law II 3PS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology 3GT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3MS25D (ACCT 2016) Financial Accounting for Business Decisions 3SY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 3The Department recommends that full-time students should be devoid of any commitment (e.g. work or other) that may impingeon their attendance and performance in this programme owing to its intensity.Diploma in Security Administration(“Summer” Programme Only) PART-TIME STUDYLevel ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT52A (GOVT 4004) Administrative Law I 3CS13B (SOCI 1002) Introduction to Computing 3PS14A (PSYC 1003) Introduction to Psychology 3Level IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT52B (GOVT 4005) Administrative Law II 3MS22A (MGMT 2008) Organizational Behaviour 3MS27A (MGMT 2021) Business Law 3PS24E (PSYC 2012) Developmental Psychology 3Level IIICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT29D (GOVT 3018) Public Sector Management 3MS25D (ACCT 2016) Financial Accounting for Business Decisions 3SY37H (SOCI 3032) Criminology 346
  • 47. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCourse LISTING for certificate programmesCertificate in Public Administration(Evening university and summer programme)Semester ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3 GT12C (GOVT 1006) Introduction to Public Administration 3 GT40A (GOVT 0401) Organizational Theory and Behaviour I 3 GT41C (GOVT 0413) Human Resource Management 3 Semester IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT11D (GOVT 1001) Introduction to Politics II 3 GT12D (GOVT 1007) Issues in Caribbean Public Administration 3 GT40B (GOVT 0402) Organizational Theory and Behaviour II 3 GT41B (GOVT 0412) A Study of Industrial Relations 3 Summer SemesterPLUS: Two (2) electives (Either two Level I courses OR one Level I course and GT44D (GOVT 0444) 6 CERTIFICATE IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT STUDIES(“Summer” Programme Only)SEMESTER ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT11C (GOVT 1000) Introduction to Politics I 3GT12C (GOVT 1006) Introduction to Public Administration 3GT40A (GOVT 0401) Organizational Theory and Behaviour I 3Plus: One (1) Elective course (selected from approved list)SEMESTER IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT12F (GOVT 1002) Theory and Practice of Local Government 3GT12G (GOVT 1003) Caribbean Local Government Systems 3GT44D (GOVT 0444) Financial Administration 3SEMESTER IIICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT41D (GOVT 0414) Public Sector Ethics 3GT12H (GOVT 1004) Practical Issues for Good Governance 3Plus: One (1) Elective course (selected from approved list)Approved Electives:Course Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT11D (GOVT 1001) Introduction to Politics II 3GT12D (GOVT 1007) Issues in Caribbean Public Administration 3GT19B (GOVT 1005) Introduction to Public Policy 3GT41B (GOVT 0412) Industrial Relations 3GT41C (GOVT 0413) Human Resource Management 3GT41F (GOVT 0416) Human Resource Development 3PS11B (PSYC 1004) Introduction to Social Psychology 3CS13B (SOSC 1002) Introduction to Computing 3 47
  • 48. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCERTIFICATE IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS(“Summer” Programme Only)SEMESTER ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsMS41A (MGMT 0411) Mathematics for Computing 3 MS41B (MGMT 0412) Foundations of Information Technology 3MS15E (ACCT 1002) Introduction to Financial Accounting 3MS12A (MGMT 1001) Introduction to Management 3SEMESTER IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsMS42A (MGMT 0421) Designing Information Systems I 3MS42B (MGMT 0422) Information Systems in Business 3MS42C (MGMT 0423) Communication for Business 3SEMESTER IIICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsMS43A (MGMT 0431) Data Communication and Distributed Data Processing 3MS43B (MGMT 0432) Data Storage and Management 3MS43C (MGMT 0433) Designing Information Systems II 3CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC SECTOR HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT(“Summer” Programme Only)SEMESTER ICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT40A (GOVT 0401) Organisational Theory & Behaviour I 3GT41C (GOVT 0413) Human Resource Management 3GT19B (GOVT 1005) Public Policy Analysis 3SEMESTER IICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT44D (GOVT 0444) Financial Administration 3GT12D (GOVT 1007) Issues in Caribbean Public Administration 3GT 41E (GOVT 0415) Compensation Management 3SEMESTER IIICourse Code Course Title Number of CreditsGT41B (GOVT 0412) Industrial Relations 3 GT41D (GOVT 0414) Public Sector Ethics 3GT41F (GOVT 0416) Human Resource Development 3GT41G (GOVT 0417) Information Systems 348
  • 49. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESOTHER ELECTIVESLEVEL: I (CO-CURRICULAR)SEMESTER: I & IICOURSE CODE: COCR 1012COURSE TITLE: WORKPLACE PROTOCOL FOR STUDENTS PROGRAMMENUMBER OF CREDITS: 3PRE REQUISITES: NONEDepartment Responsible: FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESWORKPLACE PROTOCOL FOR STUDENTS PROGRAMME The “Workplace Protocol for Students” Programme allows participants to acquire the critical social skills necessary for personaland professional success.  It is a comprehensive, relevant and highly interactive co-curricular experience aimed at providing students with the “behaviouraltools” that would enable them to close the gap between the social/workplace skills that they may not have, and those required forsuccess and prominence in today’s dynamic organisations.  Upon completion, students will exhibit the confidence, diplomacy, courtesy and poise that undoubtedly contribute to a strongprofessional presence.Assessment: 10% - Class Participation 10% - Creation & Submission of Student Experience Journal/Dossier 40% - Oral Presentations/Role Play 40% - Multiple-choice QuestionsLANGUAGE COURSESSPANISHCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterSPAN 0150 Spanish Level 1A 2 I & IISPAN 0151 Spanish Level 1B 2 I & IISPAN 0250 Spanish Level 2A 2 I & IISPAN 0251 Spanish Level 2B 2 I & IISPAN 0350 Spanish Level 3A 2 I & IISPAN 0351 Spanish Level 3B 2 I & IIFRENCHCourse Code Course Title Number of Credits SemesterFREN 0150 French Level 1A 2 I & IIFREN 0151 French Level 1B 2 I & IIFREN 0250 French Level 2A 2 I & IIFREN 0251 French Level 2B 2 I & IIFREN 0350 French Level 3A 2 I & IIFREN 0351 French Level 3B 2 I & II 49
  • 50. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESCourse descriptions LEVEL: I(According to Alphabetical order of Course Codes) SEMESTER: I & II COURSE CODE: FREN 0251Note: COURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 2Bi. Some of the following courses may not be offered in a given NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 academic year. Before attempting to register for a course, PREREQUISITE: FREN 0250 students should verify that the course is being offered and Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE determine the semester in which it is offered. LEARNING (CLL)ii. When choosing courses, students should plan their Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading and course load carefully and ensure that they register for the writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 2A French. prerequisites for courses they intend to take in the future. Students will be able to function more independently in a variety of familiar situations and topics. Assessment: 100% in courseCO-CURRICULAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONSLEVEL: ISEMESTER: I & II LEVEL: ICOURSE CODE: FREN 0150 SEMESTER: I & IICOURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 1A COURSE CODE: FREN 0350NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 COURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 3APREREQUISITE: None NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE PREREQUISITE: FREN 0251LEARNING (CLL) Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGECourse Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, LEARNING (CLL)reading and writing) course that introduces students to the Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, readingFrench language and to some of its cultural aspects. Students and writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 2Bwill develop an initial ability to communicate in the target French. Students will start showing a degree of fluency in thelanguage in situations relating to their personal lives. Students four different skills. Students will demonstrate more of thewill be introduced to the concept of learner autonomy in behaviours and attitudes of independent learners.language learning. Assessment: 100% in courseAssessment: 100% in course LEVEL: ILEVEL: I SEMESTER: I & IISEMESTER: I & II COURSE CODE: FREN 0351COURSE CODE: FREN 0151 COURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 3BCOURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 1B NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 PREREQUISITE: FREN 0350PREREQUISITE: FREN 0150 Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGEDepartment Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING (CLL)LEARNING (CLL) Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading andCourse Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading and writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 3A French.writing) course that builds on the work done in Level IA French. Students will be able to demonstrate increased ease whenStudents will enhance their ability to communicate in the interacting orally and in writing. Students will demonstratetarget language in situations relating to themselves and areas more of the behaviours and attitudes of independent learners.of immediate relevance. Students will continue to develop their Assessment: 100% in courseautonomy in language learning.Assessment: 100% in course LEVEL: I SEMESTER: I & II COURSE CODE: SPAN 0150LEVEL: I COURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL IASEMESTER: I & II NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2COURSE CODE: FREN 0250 PREREQUISITE: NoneCOURSE TITLE: FRENCH LEVEL 2A Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGENUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 LEARNING (CLL)PREREQUISITE: FREN 0151 Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking,Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE reading and writing) course that introduces students to theLEARNING (CLL) Spanish language and to some of its cultural aspects. StudentsCourse Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading and will develop an initial ability to communicate in the targetwriting) course that builds on the work done in Level 1B French. language in situations relating to their personal lives. StudentsStudents will be able to function increasingly independently in will be introduced to the concept of learner autonomy inall four skills in familiar situations and topics. language learning.Assessment: 100% in course Assessment: 100% in course50
  • 51. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLEVEL: I LEVEL: ISEMESTER: I & II SEMESTER: I & IICOURSE CODE: SPAN 0151 COURSE CODE: SPAN O351COURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL 1B COURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL 3BNUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2PREREQUISITE: SPAN 0150 PREREQUISITE: SPAN 0350Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE Department Responsible: CENTRE FORLEARNING (CLL) LANGUAGE LEARNING (CLL)Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading andand writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 1A writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 3A Spanish.Spanish. Students will enhance their ability to communicate Students will be able to demonstrate increased ease whenin the target language in situations relating to themselves interacting orally and in writing. Students will demonstrateand areas of immediate relevance. Students will continue to more of the behaviours and attitudes of independent learners.develop their autonomy in language learning. Assessment: 100% in courseAssessment: 100% in course FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLEVEL: I COURSE DESCRIPTIONSSEMESTER: I & II Level: ICOURSE CODE: SPAN 0250 Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCOURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL 2A Course Code: CS13B (SOSC 1002)NUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTINGPREREQUISITE: SPAN 0151 Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE Prerequisites: NoneLEARNING (CLL) Department Responsible: Faculty ofCourse Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading and Social Scienceswriting) course that builds on the work done in Level 1B Spanish. Course Description: This course seeks to provide the rudimentsStudents will be able to function increasingly independently in of computers to all undergraduates enrolled in the Faculty ofall four skills in familiar situations and topics. Social Sciences. Classroom teaching is accompanied by hands-onAssessment: 100% in course practical sessions in the computer laboratory where the student is introduced to electronic spreadsheets, word processing,LEVEL: I database systems and the like.SEMESTER: I & IICOURSE CODE: SPAN 0251 Level: ICOURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL 2B Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYNUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 Course Code: EC01A (ECON 0001)PREREQUISITE: SPAN 0250 Course Title: REMEDIAL MATHEMATICSDepartment Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGE Number of Credits: 3LEARNING (CLL) Prerequisites: NoneCourse Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, reading and Department Responsible: FACULTY OF SOCIALwriting) course that builds on the work done in Level 2A Spanish. SCIENCESStudents will be able to function more independently in a variety Course Description: This course is intended for those first-of familiar situations and topics. year students who have either been away from mathematicsAssessment: 100% in course for several years or possess a weak foundation in mathematics. It provides a refresher in the basic concepts of algebra, setsLEVEL: I and manipulative mathematics. No doubt that you have been exposed to much of this material at secondary school.SEMESTER: I & II However, because these topics and tools are important inCOURSE CODE: SPAN 0350 handling mathematics over the next three years of study, aCOURSE TITLE: SPANISH LEVEL 3A second exposure to them just prior to starting EC140 wouldNUMBER OF CREDITS: 2 be beneficial. Class sizes are small so as to provide the much-PREREQUISITE: SPAN 0251 needed one on one attention to students.Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR LANGUAGELEARNING (CLL)Course Description: A four skill (listening, speaking, readingand writing) course that builds on the work done in Level 2BSpanish. Students will start showing a degree of fluency inthe four different skills. Students will demonstrate more of thebehaviours and attitudes of independent learners.Assessment: 100% in course 51
  • 52. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: I Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: EC10D (ECON 1001) Course Code: EC20A (ECON 2000)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS I Course Title: INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS INumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001), EC10F (econ 1002)Department Responsible: Economics AND EC141 (econ 1003)Course Description: This course provides students to the history Department Responsible: Economicsof economic thought highlighting some of the key economic Course Description: This course presents a rigorous analysisissues, which have preoccupied the discipline from its origins. of the theory of household behaviour and demonstrates thatThe course also provides an introduction to the basic principles microeconomics is central to an understanding of consumer/of micro-economic analysis together with the main perspectives household decision-making. At the end of the course you willon the functioning of the macro-economy. The microeconomic understand (i) how microeconomic theory can be used to explainanalysis is illustrated by reference to a key export sector in the household behaviour and (ii) how to use the model of consumerCaribbean (e.g. oil or bananas). The implications of trends in the choice to demonstrate the effect of government policy onlatter for the Balance of Payments and macro economy conclude household decision-making.this first semester course. Level: IILevel: I Semester: IISemester: II Course Code: EC20B (ECON 2001)Course Code: EC10F (ECON 1002) Course Title: INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS IICourse Title: INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS II Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001), EC10F (econ 1002)Prerequisites: None AND EC141 (econ 1003)Co-requisite: EC10D (ECON 1001) Department Responsible: EconomicsDepartment Responsible: Economics Course Description: This course presents a rigorous analysisCourse Description: This course emphasizes macro-economic of the theory of firm. behaviour and welfare economics andtheory and policy and the related national income accounting demonstrates that microeconomics is central to an understandingtogether with international trade and the balance of payments. of business decision-making and government intervention inThere is a significant stress on the implications of these economic markets. At the end of the course you will understand (i) howissues for the Caribbean reality. microeconomic theory can be used to explain firm. behaviour and (ii) the conditions under which a case can be made forLevel: I government intervention in markets.Semester: ICourse Code: EC141 (ECON 1003) Level: IICourse Title: INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS I Semester: INumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: EC21A (ECON 2002)Prerequisites: Grade II pass at CXC Course Title: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS I(General) Mathematics OR EC01A OR equivalent Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Economics Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001) ANDCourse Description: Set theory, relations and functions. Number EC10F (econ 1002)theory, functions and equations. Calculus of functions of a single Department Responsible: Economicsvariable. Course Description: Theories and Models; Theories of Aggregate Demand - Consumption; Investment; Theories of Money;Note: Students who have a pass in A-Level Mathematics may Securities and the Rate of Interest; Basic Income-generationbe exempt from this course and are strongly advised to apply for Models: Neo-Classical, Keynesian, The Challenge to Keynes:such exemption. Current theories; The Labour Market in Developing Countries.Level: ISemester: IICourse Code: EC160 (ECON 1005)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICSNumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: Collection and compilation of data.Descriptive statistics, Probability and probability distributions,Sampling distributions, Estimation, Hypothesis testing, Simplecorrelation and regression. Teaching is accompanied bycomputer applications using MINITAB.52
  • 53. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: EC21B (ECON 2003) Course Code: EC23J (ECON 2006)Course Title: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS II Course Title: ECONOMIC STATISTICSNumber of Credits: 3 (STATISTICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS)Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001) AND Number of Credits: 3EC10F (econ 1002) Prerequisites: EC141 (ECON 1003) ANDDepartment Responsible: Economics EC160 (eCON 1005)Course Description: The Role of Government: Keynesian view, Department Responsible: EconomicsAlternative view; The Open Economy: Income Generation, Balance Course Description: This course seeks to provide students ofof Payments Adjustment; The Supply of Money: Determination of Economics and the Social Sciences with a sound understandingthe Supply, Constraints of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Dynamic of statistical concepts and techniques used in modern economictheories in investment; Accelerator theories, Paths of Capital analysis.Accumulation; Growth; Models of Caribbean Economy. Level: IILevel: II Semester: ISemester: I Course Code: EC24B (ECON 2015)Course Code: EC22A (ECON 3051) Course Title: MATHEMATICAL METHODS INCourse Title: TOPICS IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS INumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) AND Prerequisites: EC141 (ECON 1003) AND EEC10F (ECON 1002) C10D (ECON 1001) OR EC10F (ECON 1002)Department Responsible: Economics Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: The course introduces the student to some Course Description: Sets and Propositions, Booleanof the main development issues that have contributed to the Algebra, Groups, Rings, Number Systems, Transformation anddevelopment paths pursed either collectively or individually by Linear Systems, Matrices – determinants, Inversion, Rank andcountries of the Caribbean. In this regard the course examines Equivalence, Linear dependence and Independence, Vectors andsome of the fundamental theories on Caribbean Economic De- Vector Spaces, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, Quadratic form’s,velopment such as those as proposed by Sir Arthur Lewis and Linear and Quadratic programming, Optimization methods.Lloyd Best. Current development concerns and issues which Graphs and Sub graphs, Isomorphisms, Directed graphs,are particularly important to Caribbean Small Island Developing Hamiltonian and Eulerian Graphs, Planar graphs, Trees (BinaryStates (SIDS), e.g. health, education and natural disasters are also Trees, Spanning trees).dealt with in this course. Level: IIThis course includes an on-line component worth 40% of final Semester: IImarks and a final exam which accounts for 60% of final marks. Course Code: EC24C (ECON 2016)Students must pass both components of the course in order to Course Title: MATHEMATICAL METHODSpass it. IN ECONOMICS II Number of Credits: 3Level: II Prerequisites: EC141 (ECON 1003) ANDSemester: II EC10D (ECON 1001) OR EC10F (ECON 1002)Course Code: EC23E (ECON 2005) Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Title: SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING Course Description: Remainder Theorem, Partial Fractions,Number of Credits: 3 Fourier Series, Functions and Relations of a single variable – limits,Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001), EC10F (econ 1002 continuity, differentiation, maxima and minima. Double andAND MS15E (ACCT 1002) multiple integrals, functions of several variables – partial and totalDepartment Responsible: Economics differentiation, differentials, Taylor Expansion, Eulers Theorem,Course Description: This course seeks to provide students Jacobians, Optimization (Constrained and Unconstrained),with a thorough understanding of the structure and problems Complex numbers, Differential and Difference Equationsassociated with the preparation of national and regional (including stochastic difference equations).economic and social accounts. It also gives an introductorytreatment of data management. 53
  • 54. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: EC25F (ECON 2020) Course Code: EC30J (ECON 3002)Course Title: CARIBBEAN ECONOMY Course Title: SOCIAL ECONOMICSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC10D (econ 1001) AND Prerequisites: EC21A (ECON 2002)EC10F (econ 1002) Department Responsible: EconomicsDepartment Responsible: Economics Course Description: This course is designed to give studentsCourse Description: The objective of this course is to expose a feel for the main economic issues involved in the assessmentstudents to the literature on Caribbean economic theory and of major social sectors by focusing the tools of economicpolicy analysis. The course provides a critical review of economic analysis in Health, Housing, Education, Poverty Alleviation, thestrategies pursued or proposed for the Caribbean. Environment, and on Gender and Racial/Ethnic Discrimination and their elimination.Level: IIISemester: II Level: IIICourse Code: EC30A (ECON 3066) Semester:Course Title: CORPORATE FINANCE Course Code: EC30L (ECON 3004) (NOT OFFERED)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS IIPrerequisites: MS15F (ACCT 1003) AND Number of Credits: 3EC31E (ECON 3005) Prerequisites: NoneCo-requisite: EC31G (ECON 3011) Co-requisite: EC30F (ECON 3001)Department Responsible: Economics Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: The objective of this course is to provide Course Description: The course takes participants throughstudents with the basic practical tools of Portfolio Analysis and alternative strategies for the development of industry inInvestment in the Modern Corporate Economy. developing countries, with special reference to the Caribbean.The course draws on the experiences of other countries and analysesLevel: III the Caribbean record.Semester: IICourse Code: EC30B (ECON 3052) Level: IIICourse Title: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Semester: INumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: EC30N (ECON 3006)Prerequisites: EC21A (ECON 2002) AND Course Title: INTERNATIONAL TRADE THEORYEC21B (ECON 2003) AND POLICYDepartment Responsible: Economics Number of Credits: 3Course Description: The theoretical and empirical significance Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000), EC21A (ECON 2002)of the fiscal disequilibrium problem in developing countries. AND EC21B (ECON 2003)Approaches to the fiscal disequilibrium problem: Budget and Department Responsible: EconomicsExpenditure Reform. The disequilibrium problem: Tax Reform., Course Description: The theory of international trade includingFiscal Policy options for a small open economy. alternative theories of trade; the structure of world trade and the main factors influencing trade (trade in services); the relationshipLevel: III between trade, growth and development; international tradeSemester: I policy; regional economic integration including North-SouthCourse Code: EC30F (ECON 3001) cooperation; international investments: the multinational firm.;Course Title: INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS I institutions and agreements which influence international tradeNumber of Credits: 3 (WTO, LOME, etc.).Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000), EC20B (ECON 2001)AND EC21A (ECON 2002) Level: IIIDepartment Responsible: Economics Semester: IICourse Description: This course introduces the student to Course Code: EC30Q (ECON 3008)industrial organization theory, traditional and modern, the issues Course Title: HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHTof structure and strategy in the modern business enterprise, and Number of Credits: 3the economic implications thereof. Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) AND EC10F (ECON 1002) Department Responsible: Economics Course Description: Examination of the development of Economic analysis – Early Economic Thought,The Classical School, Marxist School, Neoclassical and Keynesian Schools. Selected Modern Trends and Controversies; Development Economics; the Establishment of Caribbean Economics.54
  • 55. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I Semester:Course Code: EC31E (ECON 3005) Course Code: EC33C (ECON 3026)Course Title: MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (NOT OFFERED this year)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE POLICY AND PLANNINGPrerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Number of Credits:3EC21A (ECON 2002) Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) ANDDepartment Responsible: Economics EC21A (ECON 2002)Course Description: The objective of this course is to provide Department Responsible: Economicsstudents with a solid grounding in (i) the fundamentals of Course Description: This course is designed to give students anmonetary theory and (ii) the effects of monetary policy on the orientation to the problems of employment generation generally,macro economy. Experiences of both developed and developing in a developing world context.countries will be used to highlight the links between theory andpolicy. Level: III Semester:Level: III Course Code: EC33D (ECON 3024)Semester: II (NOT OFFERED this year)Course Code: EC31G (ECON 3011) Course Title: ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION ANDCourse Title: ECONOMICS OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS MANPOWER PLANNINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000), EC21A (ECON 2002)EC20B (ECON 2001) AND EC21B (ECON 2003)Department Responsible: Economics Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: This course seeks to provide students with Course Description: This course is designed to provide studentsa background to the workings of the Financial Systems in Market with insights into the links between the educational and trainingEconomies generally and within the Caribbean Economic context systems and the preparation of human resources for the labourin particular. market.Level: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: EC32F (ECON 3020) Course Code: EC33E (ECON 3016)Course Title: ECONOMIC INTEGRATION Course Title: PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000), EC20B (ECON 2001),EC21A (ECON 2002) EC21A (ECON 2002) AND EC21B (ECON 2003)Department Responsible: Economics Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: Definition and rationale for Integration; Course Description: The Role of Government in the Economy;Theory of Economic Integration; Integration Instruments; Selected The Role of Government in developing countries and theproblems of integration schemes; Caribbean Integration; Case Caribbean; Public Finance - Taxation (direct and indirect) and itsstudies of other regional groupings. impact on the economy; the Theory of Public Sector Pricing and Production; The Scope and Limitations of Public Economic PolicyLevel: III and the Design of Public Policy.Semester: IICourse Code: EC33B (ECON 3007) Level: IIICourse Title: INTERNATIONAL MONETARY Semester: I& FINANCIAL THEORY Course Code: EC33H (ECON 3027)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: ECONOMIC PLANNING AND PROJECTPrerequisites: None APPRAISALCo-requisite: EC31E (ECON 3005) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Economics Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000), EC20B (ECON 2001),Course Description: The Balance of Payments; The Foreign EC21A (ECON 2002) AND EC21B (ECON 2003)Exchange Market (Euro-Currency Market and Analysis of the Department Responsible: EconomicsEfficient Market Hypothesis); International Adjustment and Course Description: This course introduces students to theStabilisation; The International Monetary System (History, principles of macroeconomic planning in a mixed economy andProblems and Proposals for Reform.); International Capital examines the methodological issues involved in integratingMarkets and the Movement of Capital; The International Debt planning and the market. The efficiency of planning inProblem. comparative term’s will be examined as well as the specifics of sectoral planning within the domestic economy. 55
  • 56. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: EC34D (ECON 3034) Course Code: EC36D (ECON 3050)Course Title: RESOURCE AND Course Title: ECONOMETRICS IIENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NonePrerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) Co-requisite: EC36C (ECON 3049)Co-requisite: EC38E (ECON 3056) Department Responsible: EconomicsDepartment Responsible: Economics Course Description: This course, a follow up to EC36C, deals withCourse Description: This course covers the economics of natural modern econometric methods, principally those involving timeresources (both renewable and non-renewable); environmental series analysis like unit root testing, co-integration, VAR modelling,and ecological economics together with the economics of ARIMA modelling and so on.sustainable development in small islands of the Caribbean. Level: IIILevel: III Semester: IISemester: Course Code: EC38E (ECON 3056)Course Code: EC35B (ECON 3042) Course Title: PROJECT EVALUATION(NOT OFFERED this year) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: SELECTED ISSUES IN PUBLIC FINANCE Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) ANDNumber of Credits: 3 EC20B (ECON 2001)Prerequisites: None Department Responsible: EconomicsCo-requisite: EC30B (ECON 3052) Course Description: This course provides the tools for planningDepartment Responsible: Economics projects (industrial, infrastructural, agricultural and social) in anCourse Description: Privatization, Resource Allocation and economy. The issues addressed include project identification,Income Distribution; Economic Considerations of Health Sector the project cycle, project appraisal and investment and projectPolicy; Social Security in Development Context; Ricardian finance.Equivalence; Fiscal Policy and Borrowing Conditionality; OtherTopical Issues Relevant to the Caribbean. Level: III Semester: ILevel: III Course Code: EC38F (ECON 3057)Semester: Course Title: HEALTH ECONOMICSCourse Code: EC35J (ECON 3029) (NOT OFFERED) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: LABOUR ECONOMICS Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) , EC20B (ECON 2001),Number of Credits: 3 EC21A (ECON 2002) AND EC21B (ECON 2003)Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Department Responsible: EconomicsEC21B (ECON 2003) Course Description: This course introduces students toDepartment Responsible: Economics the issues surrounding the objective of providing healthCourse Description: This course will focus on the traditional care consistent with the reality of scarce resources and thethemes in Labour Economics and will also provide insights into overriding concern with improving the quality of life. Studentsthe special problems of Labour Economics in the Caribbean and will be exposed to the use of economic analysis in the designa developing world context. of health policy. Special emphasis will be placed on elucidating the relationship between epidemiology and the allocation ofLevel: III resources.Semester: ICourse Code: EC36C (ECON 3049) Level: IIICourse Title: ECONOMETRICS I Semester: IINumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: EC38J (ECON 3058)Prerequisites: EC23J (ECON 2006) OR M25B (ACCT 2015. Course Title: ECONOMICS OF CULTUREEC23E (ECON 2005) recommended Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Economics Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) ANDCourse Description: The main objective of this course is to EC21A (ECON 2002)provide a fairly sound foundation in the theory and practice of Department Responsible: Economicsstandard econometric methods. Lectures will be supplemented Course Description: Cultural Authenticity and Economics;by practical laboratory sessions involving the use of econometric Microeconomics of Culture; Case Studies of Festivals of thesoftware like Eviews. Caribbean region; Microeconomic Policy in Sport and Cultural Development; Economics of Cultural Exports.56
  • 57. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: Semester: ICourse Code: EC39A (ECON 3059) (NOT OFFERED) Course Code: EC39F (ECON 3067)Course Title: ECONOMICS OF DEBT MANAGEMENT Course Title: ENERGY ECONOMICS INumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC21A (ECON 2002), EC21B (ECON 2003) Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) ANDAND EC160 (ECON 1003) EC21A (ECON 2002)Department Responsible: Economics Department Responsible: EconomicsCourse Description: This course begins with a review of the Course Description: This course covers select topics inprincipal forms of foreign indebtedness and their measurement Energy Economics. It is designed to introduce students to keytogether with the empirical trends in foreign indebtedness of microeconomic issues, and to allow them to better understandcountries of the Periphery since the 1970s. The course then the dynamics of the constituent parts of the energy value chainmoves to the theory of foreign debt management and then from exploration and production to refining and marketing. Itrelates this to the actual experience of foreign indebtedness will cover issues such as oil and gas markets and pricing, legalfrom the turn of the 1970s.The course concludes with the outline arrangements covering oil and gas exploration and production,of a model and framework for foreign borrowing including the upstream cost and production economics, plant economics anduse of computerized debt-monitoring systems. gas contracts issues. Special emphasis will be placed on the LNG industry; students are also introduced to the economics of gasLevel: III use in selected end markets. The programme will also introduceSemester: a tour of plants and facilities in the energy sector.Course Code: EC39B (ECON 3060) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: ECONOMICS OF FOREIGN INVESTMENT AND Level: IIITRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS Semester: IINumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: EC39G (ECON 3068)Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Course Title: ENERGY ECONOMICS IIEC21A (ECON 2002) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Economics Prerequisites: EC39F (econ 3067), EC21A (econ 2002)Course Description: Determinants of Foreign Investment; AND EC21B (econ 2003)Form’s of TNC participation - Equity (wholly-owned, joint Department Responsible: Economicsventure), non-equity form’s (management contracts, etc.). The Course Description: This course covers additional to)pics inlegal framework (including bilateral Investments treaties, code Energy Economics, with emphasis on macroeconomics issues.of conduct, Foreign Investment Act); The management of TNCs; Topics to be covered include oil price shocks and the globalNegotiations with TNCs; Case Studies of negotiations and joint economy, the problems associated with managing oil wealth,ventures. resource based industrialization strategies, energy policy and the environment.Level: IIISemester: Level: ICourse Code: EC39D (ECON 3061) (NOT OFFERED) Semester: ICourse Title: ECONOMICS OF TECHNOLOGY AND Course Code: GT11C (GOVT 1000)TECHNOLOGY POLICY Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS 1Number of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: EC20A (ECON 2000) AND Prerequisites: NoneEC21A (ECON 2002) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesDepartment Responsible: Economics Course Description: Topics include: the nature of Politics;Course Description: Technology theory and policy in theories of State; Concepts of Rights; Weber and Marx; Executivesmainstream economics and the developed, industrial and Legislatures; Parties; Pressure Groups; British Government;economies: neoclassical, Evolutionary Schumpeterian and American Government; West Indian Government; RelationsMarxist paradigms; modes of technology policy in the developed among States.market economies. Development of technological capabilitiesin the Caribbean and the Third World. 57
  • 58. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: I Level: ISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: GT11D (GOVT 1001) Course Code: GT12G (GOVT 1003)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS II Course Title: CARIBBEAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEMSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course introduces students to a basic Course Description: This course will allow students to develop aunderstanding of the structure and processes of modern politics. basic understanding of how the local government system in theIt builds on the fundamental topics and theories introduced in Commonwealth Caribbean operates. To this end, it will trace theGT11C. Also some new material and topic areas are covered. At evolution of Caribbean systems of local government and treatthe same time, the course is also designed to provide students in detail with the different form’s of local government as exist inwith an awareness of political ideas and concepts based on the the region. The course will allow for analysis of constraints withinwritings of a variety of thinkers and philosophers. the local government systems, as well as to explore the various local, regional and international organizations, which play a partLevel: I in seeking the advancement of Caribbean local government.Semester: ICourse Code: GT12C (GOVT 1006) Level: ICourse Title: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC Semester: IIADMINISTRATION Course Code: GT12H (GOVT 1004)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: PRACTICAL ISSUES FORPrerequisites: None GOOD GOVERNANCEDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Number of Credits: 3Course Description: This course is a general introduction to the Prerequisites: Nonediscipline and practice of public administration. It focuses on the Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesmeaning, scope and importance of public administration and its Course Description: This course consists of four basic modulesdevelopment as an academic discipline. The course will examine related to the practical operations of local government. The firstthe various administrative theories, principles, techniques and module deals with the issue of the changing role of the state in theconcepts. context of structural adjustment.The second module extends this debate by focusing on the implications of governance as opposedLevel: I to government, and thereupon review the concept of the civilSemester: II society. The third module relates to the issue of development, aCourse Code: GT12D (GOVT 1007) critical issue affecting all local government systems, while the finalCourse Title: ISSUES IN CARIBBEAN module seeks to facilitate local governments in better treatingPUBLIC ADMINISTRATION with the various publics and thus exposes the students to theNumber of Credits: 3 basis of public relations.Prerequisites: NoneCo-requisite: GT12C (govt 1006) Level: IDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Semester: IICourse Description: Building on the theoretical framework in Course Code: GT19B (GOVT 1005)the Introduction to Public Administration course, this course Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLICfocuses on specific issues in the practice and operationalization of POLICY ANALYSISpublic administration as it affects the Commonwealth Caribbean. Number of Credits: 3Students are required to work on a project (case study) to assess Prerequisites: Noneand analyze the operationalization of an aspect or concept of Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencespublic administration within a public sector environment. Course Description: This course introduces students to the concepts and process of public policy. It is a precursor toLevel: I the Levels III courses GT39E Public Policy Analysis and GT39FSemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Comparative Public Policy.Course Code: GT12F (GOVT 1002)Course Title: theory and practice of localgovernmentNumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course aims to give students a greaterunderstanding on the concept of local government.  It will alsoseek to give students an appreciation of the operations of localgovernment systems not only in the Commonwealth Caribbeanbut also in different parts of the world.58
  • 59. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: GT20A (GOVT 2051) Course Code: GT20C (GOVT 2053)Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLICINDUSTRIAL RELATIONS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR INFORMATION SYSTEMSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) AND GT19B (govt 1005) GT11D (govt 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: The aim of this course is to provide Course Description: This course serve as an introduction tostudents with an understanding of the issues surrounding the information systems in public administration. It is designed to:transformation of Industrial Relations (IR) in the modern public i. familiarize students as to the use of information technologyservice. While the impetus to reform. has been led by the private in the public sector.sector, several change factors and peculiar environmental ii. provide an understanding of the nature of informationconditions have given rise to specific challenges and systems in general, focusing on, but not limited to, theopportunities for efficiency-driven public sector management. public sector.The course will present a theoretical and conceptual appreciation iii. introduce the student to IT-related policies and issuesof the evolution of public sector industrial relations leading into associated with public information systems.the advent of Human Resource Management (HRM.). This form’sa backdrop to an analysis on the more critical and fundamental Level: IIconceptual and empirical changes from the movement from IR Semester: IIto HRM. There will be a sharp focus on the differences between Course Code: GT20D (GOVT 2054)IR and HRM. in the public service, the tensions therein and the Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO E-GOVERNMENTemerging challenges to public sector unions, managers and Number of Credits: 3change agents. The course is both multi-disciplinary, drawing Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORon the intellectual origins of IR and HRM., while it is comparative GT11D (govt 1001)and will analyse developments in the public service from a Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesdeveloping country perspective. On completion, students will be Course Description: This introductory course describes thebetter able to comprehend and resolve the myriad of employee components and models of e-government along with its socialand labour based challenges inherent in the transformation and technical factors that need to be considered. The courseof the public service, whether driven by local or multinational further explains the present policies and programs, and issuespolicy obligations and imperatives. and values relevant to e-government initiatives. It also focuses onTarget Group: Students enrolled in the second and third year of the opportunities and challenges of e-government, including theany degree programme. It is specifically aimed at public officers information gap and information security, through case studies.enrolled in the B.Sc. Government, Public Sector Management Throughout this course, the student will obtain practical andand the Diploma in Public Sector Management. theoretical knowledge on e-government.Level: II Level: IISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: GT20B (GOVT 2052) Course Code: GT21P (GOVT 2030)Course Title: PUBLIC SECTOR ACCOUNTING Course Title: PROJECT ADMINISTRATIONNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) GT11D (govt 1001) and gt19b (GOVT 1005)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Without public sector accounting Course Description: This course provides an understandingexperience, students will lack a frame of reference in attempting of the dynamics, techniques and problems associated withto apply accounting concepts and principles to public sector the administration of a project in the Public Sector. Emphasistransactions. This course will facilitate students’ understanding is placed on exposing students to a theoretical appreciation ofof accounting in the public sector, inclusive of the Public Service some of the debates surrounding the intellectual frameworkand State Enterprises. To this end, it will provide knowledge on of contemporary development cooperation. The desire ofboth not-for-profit organizations, e.g. Government Ministries, modern states to achieve rapid infrastructural developmentLocal Government, Regional and Municipal Corporations, as a prerequisite for foreign investment, economic growth andThe Tobago House of Assembly, Statutory Bodies, and State employment creation has ushered in a phase of unparalleledEnterprises, which operate as commercial entities. This course country-to-country aid and an assortment of contractualwill emphasize different types of accounting systems pertaining relationships within the multilateral lending community. Thisto the varying categories of public sector organizations. course focuses on the practical problems of public managementTarget Group: Students enrolled in the second and third year of in relation to project administration and evaluation within theany degree programme. It is specifically aimed at public officers context of actual experiences in the Caribbean.enrolled in the B.Sc. Government, Public Sector Managementand the Diploma in Public Sector Management. 59
  • 60. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IiSemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: GT23B (GOVT 2011) Course Code: GT25M (GOVT 2061)Course Title: CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS Course Title: Principles of PublicNumber of Credits: 3 International LawPrerequisites: GT11C (GOVT 1000), GT11D (GOVT 1001), Number of Credits: 3SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (SOCI 1000) Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORDepartment Responsible: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES GT11D (govt 1001)Course Description: This course examines the institutional Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesarrangements devised by societies to respond to crime. It Course Description: This course introduces students of theprovides an overview of the Criminal Justice System - and study of Public International Law as an important aspect ofwhile not being explicitly comparative, locates the Caribbean International Relations (IR). It emphasizes the nature andin the wider international context offering some comparisons sources of International Law, and underlines the role of law inand contrasts with both the developed and some developing the maintenance of order and peace in the international system.countries. It involves a survey of the police, courts and The course also considers the relevance of International Law incorrections. General issues for consideration include – how and the resolution of certain discrete areas of concern facing thewhy the system developed in the region as it did; how theories international community, such as human rights protection, andrelate to policies and how the existing system may be reformed the implementation of the principle of self-determination. Theand/or transformed. course exposes students to the concepts and techniques which form the basis for legal discourses at the international level,Level: Ii and applies some of these concepts and techniques to currentSemester: I events in the Caribbean and elsewhere.Course Code: GT24A (GOVT 2060)Course Title: International relations: Theories SEMESTER: IIand Approaches COURSE CODE: (GOVT 2062)Number of Credits: 3 COURSE TITLE: INTERNATIONAL SECURITYPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3GT11D (govt 1001) PREREQUISITIES: GT11D (GOVT 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCESCourse Description: Theory is central to the discipline of Course Description: The concept of international security isInternational Relations (IR). It is theory that distinguishes the featured as an alternative lens to power as a way of looking atfield from the study of history, current affairs of journalism and the study of International Relations (IR). The main approach ismakes the subject area more than simple descriptive thought. through the work of the Copenhagen school of security studies,This course examines the evolution of theory in IR from post- which means that the following themes are strongly emphasized:Westphalian era (1648-the present) and provides an overview the salience of levels of analysis (individual, national, regional,of some of the main theoretical approaches to the study of IR global) in thinking about international security; the use offrom traditional Idealism and Realism; to radical Postmodernism sectors to understand the new (or liberal) international securityand Feminism; as well as Now-Marxist perspectives of the agenda (military, political, economic, societal, environmental);developing world. and the understanding of security agendas not only in material terms (balancing, bandwagoning), but as socially constructed through the processes of securitisation and desecuritisation. The course will start with theory, but then work its way towards an extensive empirical look at both ‘unipolarity’ and regional security as ways of understanding the contemporary agenda of international security.60
  • 61. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESSEMESTER: I Level: IiCOURSE CODE: (GOVT 2063) Semester: ICOURSE TITLE: CYBERPOLITICS Course Code: GT27M (GOVT 2049)PREREQUISITIES: GT11D (GOVT 1001) Course Title: International political economyDEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES Number of Credits: 3Course Description: The aim of this course is to enable students Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORto critically understand and evaluate the unique political GT11D (govt 1001)dynamics that is taking place in “cyberspace” (in particular the Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesInternet/WWW).  Thus, the title of this course is “cyberpolitics.”  Course Description: This course introduces students to the natureIn particular, this course will pay attention to the way in which of, scope, and approaches to International Political Economy. It isformal political institutions and people have attempted to based on the premise that the study of International Relationsadapt to the impact of the unique information architecture of (IR) must take into account the relationship between economiccyberspace, and develop both strategies and tactics of political and political forces in the international community. Thus, thecontestation for this relatively new domain of human activity course focuses on the political economy perspective to issuesand communication. Furthermore, this course will analyze the such as the nature of the liberal international order, globalizationconflict between the openness and democratic potential of the and the nature of the international financial systems, andweb. Finally, it will examine inequality of access to the benefits distributive justice and policy coordination at the internationalof the web/internet, criminality, dissent, terrorism and war in level. It also pays attention to International Politics and to certaincyberspace. These issues will be addressed with a Caribbean contemporary problems facing the international community andfocus were possible.   the Caribbean.Level: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: GT27A (GOVT 2014) Course Code: GT28A (GOVT 2019)Course Title: FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT Course Title: COMPARATIVE POLITICSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) GT11D (govt 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course examines pre-Socratic Course Description: This course clarifies and synthesizes somephilosophy as well as Plato and Aristotle. Exposure to the political of the major theoretical directions found in the literature onideas of the Stoics, Epicurcaus, Cynics and Skeptics. Extended comparative politics. A critical examination and assessment ofexamination of Roman and Christian political thought. both orthodox and radical theories of comparative politics is undertaken.Level: IISemester: II Level: IICourse Code: GT27B (GOVT 2015) Semester: ICourse Title: MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT Course Code: GT28B (GOVT 2020)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN A SELECTEDPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR REGIONGT11D (govt 1001) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORCourse Description: A critical analysis of Machiavelli, Hobbes, GT11D (govt 1001)Locke and Rosseau. Extended analysis of Marxism-Leninism, Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesMaoism, Examination of Castro, Manley and Eric Williams. Course Description: This course deals with Imperialism; Colonialism; Nationalism; Modernization; Ideology; The Military; Consociationalism. 61
  • 62. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: GT29A (GOVT 2022) Course Code: GT29H (GOVT 2034)Course Title: FOUNDATIONS OF Course Title: PUBLIC SECTOR HUMAN RESOURCEWEST INDIAN GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) GT11D (govt 1001) and gt19b (GOVT 1005)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course focuses on Crown Colony Course Description: The aim of this course is to acquaintGovernment; Colonial Administration; Social movements; students and practitioners with the theoretical and practicalPressure Groups and Political Parties; Social Stratification in the perspectives involved in the personnel functions of theCaribbean; The Structure of Independent States. Public Sector. It focuses on the changing role of Personnel Administration, and on its critical function in the achievementLevel: II of the goals of Administration Reform. It will accordingly dealSemester: II with issues such as the role of the Public Service Commissions,Course Code: GT29B (GOVT 2023) the factors that redefined the movement from AdministrationCourse Title: ISSUES IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF to Management, the impact of the Scientific ManagementTHE WEST INDIES movement, motivation, performance appraisal, recruitmentNumber of Credits: 3 practices and the special problems associated with the PublicPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Sector.GT11D (govt 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Level: IIICourse Description: This course looks at the following Semester: Iproblems in the West Indian politics: Political leadership; Voting Course Code: GT30A (GOVT 3046)Behaviour; the Westminster System; The Nature of Political Course Title: INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONSParties; Foreign Policy; Ethnicity and Politics; The Role of the Number of Credits: 3Opposition; Military Intervention. Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR GT11D (govt 1001)Level: II Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesSemester: I Course Description: An exploration of the origins, structure,Course Code: GT29D (GOVT 3018) function and future of international organizations in theCourse Title: PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT international systems: the League of Nations, the UnitedNumber of Credits: 3 Nations, the Organization of American States, the OrganizationPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR of African Unity and Commonwealth. From time to time otherGT11D (govt 1001) international organizations will be looked at with reference toDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences current issues.Course Description: This course acquaints students withthe dynamics, techniques and problems associated with the Level: IIImanagement of the public sector, particularly in the Caribbean. Semester: IIIt discusses the context in which management techniques Course Code: GT30B (GOVT 3047)and philosophy infiltrated the traditional domain of Public Course Title: INTERNATIONAL FINANCIALAdministration. It also evaluates the record of that experience. ORGANIZATIONS Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR GT11D (govt 1001) Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course examines the politics of such international financial institutions as the World Bank, The International Monetary Fund, The Inter-American Development Bank and The Caribbean Development Bank and looks at the role of the Paris Club and international commercial banking institutions as they impact on the functioning of the international financial systems.62
  • 63. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I Semester:Course Code: GT31A (GOVT 3001) Course Code: GT32B (GOVT 3005) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: THIRD WORLD POLITICAL THOUGHT COMPARATIVE FEDERALISMNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) GT11D (govt 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course examines the political thought Course Description: A comparative and problem-orientedof major Third World leaders of the post-World War II period with approach to the study of the theory and practice of federalism inspecial attention to the Caribbean. Political thinkers include selected old and new states.Gandhi, Nkrumah, Mao Tse-Tung, Nasser, Nyerere, CLR James,Fanon, Eric Williams, Manley, Castro and others. Level: III Semester:Level: III Course Code: GT32C (GOVT 3006) (NOT OFFERED)Semester: II Course Title: POLITICAL SOCIOLOGYCourse Code: GT31B (GOVT 3002) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: COMPARATIVE ETHNIC POLITICS Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORNumber of Credits: 3 GT11D (govt 1001)Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesGT11D (govt 1001) Course Description: The nature of political sociology; politicalDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences anthropology; the classical thinkers; culture and politics; terrorismCourse Description: This course examines ethnic and race and military intervention; public opinion and mass communication;relations in developed and underdeveloped countries. Special political socialization; leadership in new states.focus on Malaysia, Guyana, Fiji and Trinidad. Examination ofmulticulturalism. Level: III Semester: ILevel: III Course Code: GT37A (GOVT 3037)Semester: II Course Title: PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONCourse Code: GT31C (GOVT 3003) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: FOREIGN POLICY IN THE THIRD WORLD Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORNumber of Credits: 3 GT11D (govt 1001) and GT12C (GOVT 1006)Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesGT11D (govt 1001) Course Description: An introduction to the theories andDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences principles and typical practices that subsume the structure andCourse Description: An examination of the foreign policy function of state bureaucracies. This course focuses on systems ofinstrument as a primary means of development and survival administration in the Westminster-Whitehall model.in the Third World. The foreign policy environment is analyzedin relation to structures of imperialism, neo-colonialism and Level: IIIdependency. Semester: II Course Code: GT37B (GOVT 3062)Level: III Course Title: COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONSemester: I Number of Credits: 3Course Code: GT32A (GOVT 3004) Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORCourse Title: SCOPE AND METHODS GT11D (govt 1001) and GT12C (GOVT 1006)IN POLITICAL ANALYSIS Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesNumber of Credits: 3 Course Description: The emphasis is on comparing andPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR contrasting the structures and processes of administrative systemsGT11D (govt 1001) supporting governments within a diversity of constitutionalDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences frameworks. Administrative systems in the U.K., the U.S.A. and theCourse Description: This course critically examines the various Commonwealth Caribbean are within the scope of this study.frameworks of analysis commonly used in policy analysis,including systems analysis, group theory, comparative method,structural functionalism, Marxist analysis, communicationstheory, quantitative methods, simulation and game theoryamong others. 63
  • 64. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: IiI Level: IIISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: GT37M (GOVT 3052) Course Code: GT38A (GOVT 3053)Course Title: Contemporary issues in Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONALinternational relations POLITICSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT11D (govt 1001) GT11D (govt 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Today’s world order is sometimes presented Course Description: This course exposes students to theas a chaotic and order-less sum of events that no longer seems major concepts and theories in the study of internationalto correspond to any pattern. This has enhanced feelings of politics; sovereignty; national interest; power; hegemony;uncertainty and unpredictability. Is today’s world indeed as interdependence and non-intervention; balance of power andchaotic as many argue? The blueprints written at the end of collective security.the Cold War have indeed not materialized and many of thedreams that were then cherished turned out to be nightmares Level: IIIin some continents. However, there are those who argue that Semester: IIthere is nothing abnormal going on, when viewed from the Course Code: GT38B (GOVT 3054)perspective of world history. World orders come and go and Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONALthe transition between them often generates uncertainty and RELATIONS IN THE CARIBBEANabject brutality. The question behind the chaos therefore is Number of Credits: 3whether a new order is in the offing and whether this order will Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORbe legitimate and sustainable. Contemporary developments GT11D (govt 1001)are not often viewed from an historical perspective. The result Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesis an impression of novelty, whereas the facts only demonstrate Course Description: Historical evolution of internationala repetition of past tendencies. This course will pay great relations in the Caribbean; Foundations and conduct of theattention to the cyclical movement of history and search for foreign policies of Caribbean states; The Caribbean in thelong-term tendencies in order to interpret the fault lines and international system (regional, hemispheric, worldwide);power relations of the decades to come. It will also examine Contemporary international problems and issues of thecurrent issues in International Relations (IR) through the lenses Caribbean area.of other theoretical positions as were introduced to the studentin (GT 24A) International Relations: Theories and Approaches. Level: IIIThis course will apply relevant theories, concepts and tools to four Semester: Iof the most pressing issues in IR today: terrorism, the HIV/AIDS Course Code: GT38C (GOVT 3019)epidemic, China’s rise to power, and the international politics Course Title: LATIN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT,of the environment, intellectual property. We will first explore POLITICS & DEVELOPMENTtheir contemporary global contexts, and then we will attempt Number of Credits: 3to locate and understand each of these issues insofar as they Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORrelate to the Caribbean. An exploration of these different issues GT11D (govt 1001)aims to clarify and consolidate the link between the theory and Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencespractice of IR, and to demonstrate the breath of international Course Description: This course focuses on contemporarypolitics in today’s world. Each issue will be treated as a module. (post 1960) Latin American development specifically inEach module comprises a general overview, definition of terms, government and politics. It builds on the tenets of Comparativehistorical bases, and relevant theoretical framework. We will Politics emphasizing the several political systems and institutionsthen explore the mainstream trends and issues vis-à-vis the that exist side by side in Latin America.topic, and finally how the issue relates to the Caribbean.64
  • 65. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III SEMESTER: IISemester: II COURSE CODE: (GOVT 3065)Course Code: GT38D (GOVT 3020) COURSE TITLE: RELIGION AND WORLD POLITICSCourse Title: POWER AND POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3Number of Credits: 3 PREREQISITIES: GT11D (GOVT 1001) ANDPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR GT24A (GOVT 2060)GT11D (govt 1001) DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCESDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: The last several decades have seenCourse Description: The course focuses on specialized topics a resurgence of religion in world politics. Political sciencewhich impact upon and influence the power structure within continues to focus attention on key questions of war and peace,the Latin American polity. To do so, however, it is necessary to democracy and dictatorship, and the state and the economy.ontextualize the notion of power within Latin America cultures, Religion is not displacing those topics. But its resilience inand it is here the course will take its point of departure. The advanced industrialized societies and its vibrancy in thecourse will thus critically examine seven agents/mechanisms developing world are casting established research agendaswhich directly and/or indirectly impact and affect the power in a new light. International terrorism, for example, raisesstructure in Latin America, with particular respect to the post questions about the religious sources of violence. Drives for1960 era. While there are no prerequisites for this course, it may democratization and human rights focus attention on theirbe instructive to note that this course complements the course compatibility or incompatibility with particular religiousGT38C. This latter course focuses on more generalized issues, traditions. Breakthroughs in the life sciences set off politicaland more so, do so in a comparative way, while GT38D focuses and religious controversies about the promise of technologyon specific issues which may not necessarily be generalized for and the sanctity of human life. And economic and politicalthe entire region. Accordingly, the topics will be treated in a globalization generates contacts across cultures and createsmore country mode of discussion. new opportunities for interreligious conflict and cooperation. The course will explore the intersection of religion andLevel: IiI politics in these four areas -- violence, democracy, science, andSemester: I globalization. It will be heavy on theory: the very best effortsCourse Code: GT38M (GOVT 3055) to conceptualize the intersection of religion and politics in aCourse Title: theory and practices of changing world. But it will also be problem driven.international negotiationsNumber of Credits: 3 SEMESTER: IPrerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR COURSE CODE: GT36M (GOVT 3066)GT11D (govt 1001) COURSE TITLE: INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENTDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3Course Description: Negotiation is a prominent feature in PREREQISITIES: GT24A (GOVT 2060) ANDInternational Relations (IR). The course provides students with GT25M (GOVT 2061)an understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCESinternational negotiation with the aim to understand how Course Description: This course examines some of the ways inoutcomes come about and how outcomes can be improved. which Public International Law contributes, or may contribute,Appropriate case studies will be expected to use these to development in a number of discrete contexts.  In particular,illustrations to supplement their knowledge of theoretical it requires students to examine international legal rules withissues. respect to Human Rights, the Law of the Sea, Counter-Narcotics efforts, Trade and Investment, and to assess the extent to which these rules promote or undermine economic development.  This course is intended to build on the foundation created in Principles of Public International Law (GT 25M). 65
  • 66. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESSEMESTER: II Level: IIICOURSE CODE: (GOVT 3067) Semester: ICOURSE TITLE: CARICOM SINGLE MARKET AND ECONOMY Course Code: GT39K (GOVT 3023)(CSME) : INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS Course Title: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW INUMBER OF CREDITS: 3 Number of Credits: 3PREREQUISITIES: GT11D (GOVT 1001) AND Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORGT24A (GOVT 2060) GT11D (govt 1001)DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course provides specific knowledge of Course Description: This course traces the developmentthe CARICOM (Caribbean Common Market) Single Market and of representative and responsible government in theEconomy (CSME) as an actor in the international environment Commonwealth Caribbean since 1945. It examines theas well as skills in international negotiations and diplomacy. constitutional environment and the legal framework sinceIt also examines theories of Integration. The course aims at a independence, the separation of powers and the limitationscomprehensive understanding of the CSME’s external relations placed on the Executive and the Legislature, the administrationbringing together an interdisciplinary analysis of its internal of justice and the exercise of emergency powers.decision-making processes with developments in the broadercontext of international relations and diplomacy. Level: III Semester: IILevel: III Course Code: GT39L (GOVT 3024)Semester: I Course Title: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW IICourse Code: GT39E (GOVT 3021) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) ORNumber of Credits: 3 GT11D (govt 1001)Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR GT11D (govt Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences1001) and GT12C (GOVT 1006) AND gt19B (GOVT 1005) Course Description: This course examines the legal andDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences constitutional effect of sovereignty in the CommonwealthCourse Description: This course sets forth the theoretical Caribbean, the relationship between the citizen and thevariables which influence public policy formulation and State, emergency powers and national security, the role ofimplementation. Emphasis is on the application of the systems the Ombudsman, Parliament and parliamentary procedure,approach to the analysis of public decisions. Commonwealth Caribbean Republics and their Presidents, constitutional interpretation and issues in constitutionalLevel: III reform.Semester: IICourse Code: GT39F (GOVT 3035) Level: CERTIFICATECourse Title: COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS Semester: INumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: GT40A (GOVT 0401)Prerequisites: GT11C (govt 1000) OR GT11D (govt Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND1001) and GT12C (GOVT 1006) AND gt19B (GOVT 1005) BEHAVIOUR IDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Number of Credits: 3Course Description: This course focuses on case histories Prerequisites: Nonein various analytic categories of public policy analysis. Issues Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesrelated to ideology and public bureaucracy; interest groups Course Description: The course will comprise the followingand political parties; rationality and politics are examined topics: Behaviour; Characteristics of organizations; Classicalcomparatively, especially in relation to Third World and theory; The Human Relations Movement; Characteristics ofCaribbean case histories. modern organizational theory; motivation and productivity; Organizational development; Organizational Theory and Behaviour.66
  • 67. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: CERTIFICATE Level: CERTIFICATESemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: GT40B (GOVT 0402) Course Code: GT41C (GOVT 0413)Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTBEHAVIOUR II Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NonePrerequisites: None Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course will seek to explore in greaterCourse Description: This course will include the following Human Resource considerations with specific reference to thetopics: The Characteristics of Organizations; Overview of Public Sector. The following topics will be dealt with: DefiningOrganization and management theory; Administrative Human Resource Management; Role and function of PersonnelTheory and Bureaucracy; The Human Relations Movement; Agencies and Service Commissions; Issues affecting HumanModern Organizational Theory; Typologies of Organizations; Resource Management in the Public Sector – gender, inequality,Motivation; Job design and Productivity; Stress Management; discrimination etc.; The Role and function of the OrganizationDecision-making; Communication Organizational Change and and Management Division; Environmental ergonomics,Development. Physical facility, employee safety, health and welfare; Employee assistance programme; Strategic Planning; Corruption, TrainingLevel: CERTIFICATE and Performance Evaluation.Semester:Course Code: GT41A (GOVT 0411) (NOT OFFERED) Level: CERTIFICATECourse Title: A STUDY OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYNumber of Credits:3 Course Code: GT41D (GOVT 0414)Prerequisites: None Course Title: PUBLIC SECTOR ETHICSDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Number of Credits: 3Course Description: This course will cover the concept and Prerequisites: Nonephilosophy of Personnel Management; The Personnel Functions; Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeHuman Resource Development; Organization of the Personnel Course Description: The aim of this course is to enableManagement function; Relationships in Personnel Management; students to examine the implications of ethical decisions inThe Meaning and Organization of Work; Employee Needs; organizational life. It seeks to provide managers with guidelinesInter-personal Relationships; Human Resource Selection and and theories, which link ethical issues and economic practice.Development; Worker Welfare and Job Tenure; Interviewing. The course will look at the following issues: ethical theories, the social responsibility of business, ethics and decision-making,Level: CERTIFICATE insider trading, whistle-blowing, ethics and salesmanship andSemester: II business ethics in a global environment.Course Code: GT41B (GOVT 0412)Course Title: A STUDY OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Level: CERTIFICATENumber of Credits: 3 Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYPrerequisites: None Course Code: GT41E (GOVT 0415)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Title: COMPENSATION MANAGEMENTCourse Description: This course of study looks at the Number of Credits: 3concepts, attitudes and approaches to Industrial Relations; Prerequisites: NoneTrade Unionism; Trade Unions and the wider society; Collective Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeBargaining; Management-worker Conflict; Causes and patterns Course Description: This course will expose students toof strikes and their resolutions; The Role of the State in Industrial such issues as wage policy, remuneration packages, perks andRelations. bonuses, methods of evaluation, motivation, performance and morale of employees and, the legal aspects of compensation. 67
  • 68. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: CERTIFICATE Level: DIPLOMASemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Semester: ICourse Code: GT41F (GOVT 0416) Course Code: GT50A (GOVT 4000)Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY ANDNumber of Credits: 3 BEHAVIOURPrerequisites: None Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Faculty Office Prerequisites: NoneCourse Description: This course is designed to further Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesdevelop the material covered in the Human Resource Course Description: This course will focus on the study ofManagement course as well as to expose students to issues organizational relationships and human behaviour in publicand techniques associated with the development of human and private enterprise; the purpose of organizations; the natureresources in the public sector. Course coverage will include of organizations; the dynamics of organizations.the internal and external environment as it affects humanresource development, human resource decision-making, equal Level: DIPLOMAemployment opportunities, employers and employee rights, Semester:strategic training, improving productivity and quality and, Course Code: GT50B (GOVT 4001) (NOT OFFERED)leadership and management. Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTLevel: CERTIFICATE Number of Credits: 3Semester: “SUMMER” ONLY Prerequisites: NoneCourse Code: GT 41G (GOVT 0417) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Title: INFORM.ATION SYSTEMS Course Description: The nature and purpose of organizations:Number of Credits: 3 hierarchy in organizations, responsibility and authority inPrerequisites: None organizations, formal and informal relationships in organizations.Department Responsible: Faculty Office Management by objectives: performance appraisal; policyCourse Description: The purpose of this course is to formulation; decision-making; long range planning. Industrial-acquaint students, lower level supervisors and managers labour relations and personnel management (the making ofwith an introduction to information systems. The importance labour relations; collective bargaining; participation; recruitmentof information for organizations, and for coping with the and selection; training).increasing global changes make it imperative to possessaccurate data on which to base policy. The course will focus on Level: DIPLOMApeople, data and procedures and will necessarily involve some Semester:computer techniques. Topics will include information theory, Course Code: GT51A (GOVT 4002) (NOT OFFERED)systems analysis, human and organizational communication, Course Title: PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONtelecommunications and computing. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NoneLevel: CERTIFICATE Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesSemester: II Course Description: This course introduces the student to theCourse Code: GT44D (GOVT 0444) theories and principles as well as the typical practices whichCourse Title: FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION subsume the structure and function of state bureaucracies.Number of Credits: 3 This course of study will focus principally on systems ofPrerequisites: None administration in the Westminster Whitehall tradition withDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences appropriate references to other systems of administration.Course Description: This course is intended to give the studenta general understanding of the various aspects of public sector Level: DIPLOMAfinancial administration.The following topics will be covered:The Semester:National Budget; Recurrent and Capital Expenditure; Revenue; Course Code: GT51B (GOVT 4003) (NOT OFFERED)Financial Administration in State Enterprises/Statutory Boards; Course Title: DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION:Role and function of the Auditor-General; Role and function of THE CARIBBEAN AND THIRD WORLDTreasury Division. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: None Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of administrative systems in the Commonwealth Caribbean and the Third World generally in the context of the political, social and economic environment in which these systems operate. It focuses on the structures and processes of public administration in this region and on the problems and issues that are associated with both administrative reforms and social and economic transformation.68
  • 69. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: DIPLOMA Level: DIPLOMASemester: I Semester:Course Code: GT52A (GOVT 4004) Course Code: GT55A (GOVT 4008) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW I Course Title: PUBLIC ENTERPRISENumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course examines the emergence Course Description: The objectives of this segment of theof sovereign states in the Commonwealth Caribbean, their course of study of Public Enterprises are: to understand theconstitutional environment and the legal framework; the powers political and social rationalizations for the establishment of publicof the Executive, Parliament and the Judiciary; the judicial enterprises and to evaluate their importance as administrativeoptions available to the citizen for redress and the powers of devices in the context of both the developed world as well as thethe State to infringe the rights of the citizen. developing; to analyze the structural/functional characteristics of the principal types of organizations devised for the operationLevel: DIPLOMA and management of public enterprises with particular attentionSemester: “SUMMER” ONLY to the implications of these characteristics for the performanceCourse Code: GT52B (GOVT 4005) and control of public enterprises.Course Title: ADMINISTRATIVE LAW IINumber of Credits: 3 Level: DIPLOMAPrerequisites: None Semester:Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Code: GT55B (GOVT 4009) (NOT OFFERED)Course Description: This course examines the legal and Course Title: PUBLIC ENTERPRISE IN THE THIRD WORLDconstitutional effect of sovereignty in the Commonwealth Number of Credits: 3Caribbean; the doctrines of collective and ministerial Prerequisites: Noneresponsibility together with the variations of the doctrine Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesof parliamentary supremacy and the power of the courts to Course Description: This course is a sequel to the successfuloverrule executive and legislative action; the concept of checks completion of the programme of study in Semester I. Theand balances on the actions of the State. focus would be on the experiences of Caribbean governments in particular and Third World governments generally in theLevel: DIPLOMA operation of public enterprises. Special attention will be paid toSemester: (i) methodologies and mechanisms employed in planning theCourse Code: GT54A (GOVT 4006) (NOT OFFERED) range of activities undertaken by public enterprises in theseCourse Title: STATISTICS countries; and (ii) evaluation of their performances and theirNumber of Credits: 3 impact on the socio-economic well-being of the societies theyPrerequisites: None serve.Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: The nature and scope of statistics: Data Level: DIPLOMAcollection; Testing and reliability of data; Classification and Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYtabulation; Presentation of statistics in diagrammatic form.; Course Code: GT56A (GOVT 4010)Frequency distributions and descriptive statistical measures; Course Title: LITERATURE AND SOCIETYIndex number theory and practice; Regression and correlation; IN THE CARIBBEANTime series analysis; Probability theory; Estimation theory; Non- Number of Credits: 3Parametric research. Prerequisites: None Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeLevel: DIPLOMA Course Description: This course attempts to give an overviewSemester: of issues in the development of Caribbean societies, usingCourse Code: GT54B (GOVT 4007) (NOT OFFERED) literary texts of high artistic merit to look, from a different angle,Course Title: METHODS OF POLITICAL RESERACH at major Caribbean issues: history, race, gender, developmentalNumber of Credits: 3 problems, independence and sovereignty.Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: The nature, scope and objectives ofscientific research in the field of social sciences; The logic, modelsand techniques of scientific analysis and explanation; Thenature, purpose and types of research designs; The problemsand techniques of data collection; The methods and techniquesof data analysis, interpretation and presentation. 69
  • 70. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: DIPLOMA Level: DIPLOMASemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Code: GT56B (GOVT 4011) Course Code: GT57A (GOVT 4013)Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF THE CARIBBEAN Course Title: CARIBBEAN ECONOMYNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Faculty Office Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeCourse Description: The purpose of this course is to provide Course Description: The course seeks to introduce students tostudents with a basic understanding of Caribbean sociology. the principal aspects of the Caribbean economy. The followingContemporary Caribbean societies are relatively young topics will be covered:societies. These societies emerged out of the colonial encounter • Introduction to the Caribbean region: essentialbetween Europe and peoples from other lands with their own characteristics of the Caribbean – geographical andunique characteristics. Though young, what has emerged in demographical features, quality of life, principal products,Caribbean societies of today are extremely complex socio- principal economic problems.cultural formations, a situation which is accounted for in no • Introduction to Caribbean economic thought: Arthursmall measure by the introduction into the region of such a Lewis, the structural and radical schools and other currentswide variety of peoples of diverse origins. While clearly defining in Caribbean economic thought.the Caribbean character of these societies, the course will also • Developmental strategies: industrialization by invitation,seek to explore the rich diversity of Caribbean social life. state intervention, neo-liberalism economic co-operation and integration: CARIFTA, CARICOM, OECS, monetary andLevel: DIPLOMA political unions.Semester: “SUMMER” ONLY • Current economic problems: crisis and debt, interventionCourse Code: GT56C (GOVT 4012) of the multilateral organizations (IMF, World Bank) andCourse Title: THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS structural adjustment, privatization and economicOF THE CARIBBEAN liberalization, the effect of the global economy.Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Level: DIPLOMADepartment Responsible: Faculty Office Semester: ICourse Description: The aim of this course is to provide Course Code: GT57C (GOVT 4014)students with an understanding of the forces that have shaped Course Title: BUSINESS AND SOCIETY IN THE CARIBBEANand continue to shape the politics of the region. While the major Number of Credits: 3focus will be on the English-speaking Caribbean, some attempt Prerequisites: Nonewill be made, where appropriate, to incorporate the French Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesand Hispanic experiences. The course will attempt to cover the Course Description: This course attempts to delineate andfollowing areas and issues: The Colonial legacy; Models for the analyze some of the major factors affecting business enterpriseanalysis of Caribbean politics; Political systems in the Caribbean in the Caribbean. The emphasis is on economic and social- presidential vs. parliamentary; Political parties and pressure trends within the Caribbean region in relation to problemsgroups; Voting behaviour; Ethnicity and politics such as fiscal policy, social structure, business ethics, labour relations and the relations of the Caribbean within international institutions such as INAF, IBRD and GATT, along with the issue of technology.70
  • 71. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: DIPLOMA Level: IISemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Semester:Course Code: GT57D (GOVT 4015) Course Code: HM20B (HOTL 2002)Course Title: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (NOT OFFEREDthis year)OF THE CARIBBEAN Course Title: HOTEL AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: HTM 228*Department Responsible: Faculty Office Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: The course is designed to give students Course Description: This course is intended to provide thean appreciation for the set of attributes, values, structures grounding necessary to allow students to: (a) identify theand processes that shape relations between the Caribbean factors that make the difference between success and failureand other actors within the world-system. Specific attention in the accommodation and restaurant business; (b) developwill be given to the historic origins and contexts of the varied a marketing plan to attract customers; (c) design and price ainteractions and transactions that have contributed to the menu for maximum promotional effect; (d) provide service topresent form. of the world-system and the specificity of the the customer that will make them want to return; (e) designCaribbean in it. the front office to add to the customer experience; (f ) design the back of the house to increase employee productivity; (g)While the principal focus of the course will be on the develop procedures for effective purchasing, receiving, storingCommonwealth Caribbean, the affairs of the wider region will and issuing of items; (h) prevent food-borne diseases; (i) analyzenot be neglected. The role of countries such as Cuba, Haiti and financial statements systematically to determine the profitabilitythe Dominican Republic in the international relations of the of the operation; (j) efficiently staff the operations with qualityCaribbean will be discussed to illustrate diversity as well as employees.commonality. *T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) courseTopics to be covered will include: Level: II• International relations of the Caribbean: A perspective Semester: II• Attributes and determinants of Caribbean international Course Code: HM22A (HOTL 2010) relations Course Title: CRUISE LINE OPERATIONS• Intra-Caribbean relations: The quest for integration. AND MANAGEMENT Number of Credits: 3Level: II Prerequisites: NoneSemester: Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Code: HM20A (HOTL 2001) Course Description: The cruise industry is one of the fastest(NOT OFFERED this year) growing sectors in the tourism and hospitality field. This courseCourse Title: PROPERTY AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT is designed to give students a comprehensive overview ofNumber of Credits: 3 the cruise industry. Some of the main topics to be discussedPrerequisites: HTM 228* include:Department Responsible: Management Studies • Cruise history and evolutionCourse Description: This course provides the opportunity for • The relationship between cruise and other segments of thestudents to explore the management of the physical product hospitality industryand the implications for service management. Students will also • Identification of trends and shifts in the cruise industry/examine the range of maintenance and refurbishment policies, marketengineering policies, environmental and energy commonly • Operating and maintenance proceduresencountered in the management of accommodation. The • Sales and Marketingcourse also investigates the multi-faceted nature of the Rooms • Ship profiles and itinerariesDivision and looks at the different systems of accommodation • Impacts of cruise industrymanagement to be found in the range of accommodation • Career opportunitiestypes. Legislation relating to property management and spacerequirements will also be discussed.*T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) course 71
  • 72. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: HM30A (HOTL 3000) Course Code: HM33B (HOTL 3004)Course Title: RESORT PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Course Title: HOSPITALITY ANDNumber of Credits: 3 TOURISM RESEARCH PROJECTPrerequisites: HM20A (HOTL 2001) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Management Studies Prerequisites: All core courses ofCourse Description: This course will explore the resort the Hospitality option to datedevelopment patterns from a historical to a present day Department Responsible: Management Studiesperspective. It will also examine the management of resorts Course Description: The course objective is to involvewith special emphasis on all-inclusive resorts. Marketing and students with strategic management process as it appliesneeds assessment of consumers are included in the topics to the hospitality and tourism industry. It seeks to develop acovered. critical approach to theoretical and practical aspects of strategic management, particularly focusing on the process, content andLevel: III context of strategy. The wide-ranging debate on the variety ofSemester: I approaches to strategic management is investigated. StudentsCourse Code: HM30B (HOTL 3001) are encouraged to tackle complex issues, understand the inter-Course Title: MEETINGS AND CONVENTION related aspects of organizational change, and develop solutionsMANAGEMENT to multi-faceted problems. The rich academic literature isNumber of Credits: 3 explored, but with a consistent view of the importance ofPrerequisites: HTM 226* applying theory in a number of different business contexts.Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course will examine the planning, Level: IIIarranging and organization of conventions, meetings and Semester:expositions. The focus will be on the role and the relationship Course Code: HM35A (HOTL 3003)of the major players in the convention, meeting and exposition (NOT OFFERED this year)industry and its importance in the overall hospitality industry. Course Title: ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT*T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) course Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NoneLevel: III Department Responsible: Management StudiesSemester: Course Description: This course covers the types of liveCourse Code: HM30C (HOTL 3002) entertainment and logistics of special events management(NOT OFFERED this year) – crowd control, special effects, lighting, decorations, sound andCourse Title: MANAGEMENT OF QUALITY protocol for fairs, festivals, sporting events and grand openings.Number of Credits: 3 This course will also introduce the student to the planning andPrerequisites: None organization of different aspects of entertainment. The roleDepartment Responsible: Management Studies of the hotel entertainment director, the role of the producer/Course Description: The aim of this course is to sensitize presenter, with emphasis on contracts with performers, unions,hospitality and tourism management students to the critical agents and managers will be covered. Copyright laws andimportance of service excellence and professionalism in the immigration laws as they relate to performers will also behospitality and tourism industry. The course examines the covered.service characteristics of hospitality and tourism systems and theimplications of these characteristics on the design, operations Level: Iand management of such systems. Topics to be covered include Semester: Ithe nature of the service process, understanding the service Course Code: MS12A (MGMT 1001)encounter, defining and meeting the service expectations Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENTand delivery. Problems of service delivery, personal problems, Number of Credits: 3motivation, training, stress, seasonality and quality control will Prerequisites: Nonealso be emphasized. Department Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: The objectives are to expose students to the process of management in both profit and non-profit organizations, to stimulate students to think of managerial issues from both local and global perspectives and to introduce students to ethical and environmental considerations in business.72
  • 73. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: I Level: IISemester: II Semester: I & IICourse Code: MS13A (MGMT 1022) Course Code: MS20A (MGMT 2003)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO BANKING Course Title: PRINCIPLES OF MARKETINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) ANDDepartment Responsible: Management Studies MS15E (ACCT 1002)Course Description: This course is concerned with basic Department Responsible: Management Studiesconcepts, theories and issues involved in banking. Its Course Description: This course is intended to providefirst part is mainly descriptive: organizational structure of students with the conceptual framework and analytical skillsfinancial institutions, regulatory framework, banker/customer necessary for the analysis of markets and marketing activities ofrelationship, services provided by banks; Its second part tackles firm’s in a dynamic environment.managerial issues, as risk management. On the other hand, itdoes not tackle hedging risk with derivatives nor banking crises. Level: IIThe topic of banking in connection with monetary policy is Semester: Imerely sketched. Course Code: MS20D (MGMT 2029) Course Title: CONTEMPORARY HOSPITALITY ANDLevel: I TOURISM TRENDSSemester: I Number of Credits: 3Course Code: MS15E (ACCT 1002) Prerequisites: GE 154*Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO Department Responsible: Management StudiesFINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Course Description: The course will provide an investigation ofNumber of Credits: 3 current trends in the hospitality and tourism industry at the localPrerequisites: None and regional levels and their effects on the Caribbean. StudentsDepartment Responsible: Management Studies will use a variety of resources to follow the development ofCourse Description: An introductory course designed for these trends. They will also explore issues and problems as theystudents of accounting and those in other areas of study. It aims develop and examine possible applications and solutions.at providing a practical and a theoretical understanding of the *T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) courseprinciples and concepts involved in the preparation of financialstatements. Students are exposed to a conceptual analytical Level: IIapproach with the aim of improving their critical thinking and Semester: I & IIcommunicative skills. Course Code: MS21B (MGMT 2006) Course Title: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ILevel: I Number of Credits: 3Semester: II Prerequisites: NoneCourse Code: MS15F (ACCT 1003) Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Title: INTRODUCTION TO COST Course Description: This course provides an overview ofAND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING Management Information Systems. It describes the componentsNumber of Credits: 3 of Management Information Systems and the relationshipPrerequisites: None of MIS to the larger area of Organization and Management.Co-requisite: MS15E (ACCT 1002) Information Systems Technology is covered.Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This is an introductory course for students Level: IIof accounting as well as other areas of study. It aims to acquaint Semester: I (FULL-TIME); SEMESTER II (EVENING UNIV.)them with the uses of accounting information and techniques Course Code: MS21E (MGMT 2007)useful to the manager in planning, decision-making and Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO E-COMMERCEcontrolling organizational activities. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003) AND MS21B (MGMT 2006) Department Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course aims to prepare students with the requisite fundamentals to enable them to provide the business perspective/inputs to the e-commerce adoption process. Emphasis will be on the underlying commercial principles of e-commerce rather than on the technological processes. Topics to be covered include: Internet Demographics; Internet Business Models; Customer Support Strategies; Security Issues in E-commerce; Legal Issues in E-commerce; Logistical Challenges for Caribbean E-commerce. 73
  • 74. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: I & II Semester: IICourse Code: MS22A (MGMT 2008) Course Code: MS23B (MGMT 2011)Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Course Title: CARIBBEAN BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) ANDMS12A (MGMT 1001) EC10F (ECON 1002)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course uses the systems approach to Course Description: The structure and functioning oforganizations to highlight how interrelated variables such as Caribbean economies and societies as they affect enterprisepeople, technology, task, structure and external environments management. Special emphasis will be given to ethical andimpact on organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is on the environmental considerations in the conduct of business asnature of behavioural issues and how and why they impact on well as to the sociological, political and legal framework withinthe functioning of organizations. which Caribbean business is conducted.Level: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: MS22G (MGMT 2009) Course Code: MS23C (MGMT 2012)Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT Course Title: QUANTITATIVE METHODSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS12A (MGMT 1001) OR SY13E (SOCI 1002) Prerequisites: EC10F (ECON 1002) ANDand normally open only to students pursuing the EC141 (ECON 1003)Sports Management Major or Minor. Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course is an introductory level surveyCourse Description: This course will acquaint students with of quantitative techniques commonly used to provide insightthe relationship between sport and the society in which it is into business decisions. The primary emphasis is on preparingembedded. Sociological concepts and theories will be used the student to become an intelligent user of these techniques.to examine the following issues: the role of sport in advancingsocial struggle and challenging various form’s of inequality and Level: IIdomination; the role of sport in the wider development process; Semester: Icommercialization of sport; the organization of sport in the Course Code: MS24B (MGMT 2030)Caribbean; deviance in sport; sport and gender issues. Course Title: BANKING LAW Number of Credits: 3Level: II Prerequisites: MS13A (MGMT 1022)SEMESTER: I Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Code: MS22M (MGMT 2010) Course Description: This course is concerned with all aspectsCourse Title: INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MANAGEMENT of the law, which affect bankers (both statute law and commonNumber of Credits: 3 law), with special emphasis on the relationship with theirPrerequisites: None customers.Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course is designed to introduce Level: IIthe student to the sport administration field. Students will be Semester: IImade aware of the career options available to them in the sport Course Code: MS24C (MGMT 2031)management profession and learn about the types of skills, Course Title: BANKING RISK MANAGEMENTability and knowledge that is required by sport administrators Number of Credits: 3whether they are managing amateur or professional sport Prerequisites: MS13A (MGMT 1022) ANDprogrammes, running events, marketing sporting goods or MS28D (MGMT 2023)designing athletics or physical education programmes. Department Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course is concerned with current banking practices that control different kinds of risk. It explores the management of bank lending, securities, capital, liabilities, and liquidity; and discusses regulation, competition, policy, and internal bank management.74
  • 75. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: I & IICourse Code: MS25A (ACCT 2014) Course Code: MS25E (ACCT 2020) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I Course Title: COST AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS15E (ACCT 1002) Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course is designed for students who Course Description: This course is designed for studentsare considering careers in accountancy. Materials covered in who have not completed MS15E and MS15F. The focus is onthe introductory course are continued and extended with the Management Planning and Control. Business students andobjective of obtaining an in-depth understanding of modern managers will understand the relevance of the more traditionalaccounting. accounting topics to business decisions.Level: II Level: IISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: MS25B (ACCT 2015) Course Code: MS25H (ACCT 2021)Course Title: INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II Course Title: COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS25A (ACCT 2015) Prerequisites: MS15F (ACCT 1003)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course is a continuation of the Course Description: This course continues and extends theintermediate accounting programme commenced in MS25A. principles and concepts of management accounting covered inIt is designed for students who are considering careers in the introductory course. The student is exposed to a more in-accountancy. Materials covered in the introductory course are depth understanding of current theory and practice.continued and extended. Level: IILevel: II Semester: IISemester: I Course Code: MS26A (MGMT 2032)Course Code: MS25C (ACCT 2017) Course Title: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICSCourse Title: MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) ANDPrerequisites: MS15E (ACCT 1002) AND EC141 (ECON 1003)MS15F (aCCT 1003) Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course is concerned with theCourse Description: The course explains how managerial application of economic principles and methodologies to theaccounting information is used by managers in manufacturing, decision-making process of the business firm. operating underretail, service and not-for-profit organizations to anticipate the conditions of risk and uncertainty. Emphasis is also placed onfuture and monitor the activities of the business. the firm’s competitive strategy.Level: II Level: IISemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Semester: I & IICourse Code: MS25D (ACCT 2016) Course Code: MS27A (MGMT 2021)Course Title: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Course Title: BUSINESS LAWFOR BUSINESS DECISIONS Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NonePrerequisites: None Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: The main focus of this course is theCourse Description: This course is designed for students who general principles of the law of contract, the law of Agency ashave not completed MS15E and MS15F. It provides a practical well as other related areas of interest like the Sale of Goods Actand theoretical understanding of the principles and concepts and the Hire Purchase Act 1938 and 1954. Background materialinvolved in the preparation of financial statements. covers the role and function of the law in society, the sources of the law, the legal system etc. 75
  • 76. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: MS27E (MGMT 2022) Course Code: MS28E (MGMT 2024)Course Title: THE LAW AND SPORT Course Title: MONEY AND CAPITAL MARKETSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS22M (MGMT 2010) and normally Prerequisites: EC10F (ECON 1002) ANDopen only to students pursuing the Sports EC160 (ECON 1005)Management Major or Minor. Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course is concerned with theCourse Description: This course is designed to provide institutions through which financial transactions take placestudents with a general understanding of the functioning of and the mechanisms in use for effective operation of thesethe Legal System with particular reference to the potential institutions. Students should develop a thorough understandingproblems likely to be faced by those involved with Sport and of Trinidad and American institutions and how businesses usePhysical Education. Students will review and analyze judicial them.opinions on legal issues that have frequently arisen in situationsinvolving organized sports. Generic legal issues affecting Level: IIIsporting providers and participants such as health and safety, Semester: Icontracts and licensing will be explored. Course Code: MS30A (MKTG 3000) Course Title: MARKETING MANAGEMENTLevel: II Number of Credits: 3Semester: I & II Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003)Course Code: MS28D (MGMT 2023) Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Title: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT I Course Description: This course is concerned with theNumber of Credits: 3 development of the student’s marketing decision-makingPrerequisites: MS15E (ACCT 1002) AND skills and communication effectiveness. It is case-based, andEC141 (ACCT 1003) students are expected to undertake a marketing project basedDepartment Responsible: Management Studies on fieldwork.Course Description: This course is concerned with the coreconcepts of financial decision-making; the time-value of money, Level: IIIthe cost of capital and trade-offs between risk and return. Semester: IIStudents should develop a thorough understanding of these Course Code: MS30B (MKTG 3001)basic concepts and how to apply them in real-world examples. Course Title: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING MANAGEMENTLevel: II Number of Credits: 3Semester: II Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003)Course Code: MS28G (MGMT 2025) Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Title: FISCAL MANAGEMENT IN SPORT Course Description: This course focuses on the techniquesNumber of Credits: 3 and strategies necessary to develop marketing plans for thePrerequisites: MS15E (ACCT 1002) AND MS15F international market place.(aCCT 1003) and normally open only to studentspursuing the Sports Management Major or Minor. Level: IIIDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Semester: ICourse Description: This course emphasizes the basic decision- Course Code: MS30C (MKTG 3002)making tools and analytical processes involved in the financing Course Title: MARKETING RESEARCHof sporting events: the evaluation of short term. financing Number of Credits: 3instruments versus long term. financing instruments, cash Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003) ANDflow statement analysis, cost control and asset management MS23C (MGMT 2012)decisions, ticket pricing and the preparation and analysis of pro Department Responsible: Management Studiesform. a statements for profitability planning. Course Description: This course focuses on the design and execution of market research projects and the presentation of results in a form. useful for decision makers.76
  • 77. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: MS30D (MKTG 3007) Course Code: MS30N (MGMT 3015)Course Title: MARKETING PLANNING Course Title: INTRODUCTION TONumber of Credits: 3 INFORMATION SECURITYPrerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003), MS23C Number of Credits: 3(MGMT 2012) AND MS28D (MGMT 2023) Prerequisites: MS21B (MGMT 2006)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: The intention is to equip students with Course Description: This course prepares the studentsthe tools necessary for effective marketing planning in the with the knowledge to participate effectively in the design,public and private sectors. Analytical methods and data sources implementation and maintenance of information securitynecessary in defining competition, analyzing an industry and programmes. This course will focus on the principles ofcustomers, and forecasting market potential is covered in depth. information security as well as some of the technologicalStudents are expected to develop an actual marketing plan as a issues. Upon completion of this course, students will be able tocoursework project. support information security initiatives as non-technical users and managers. Upon completion of this course students willLevel: III be able to:Semester: I • define and understand information security terminology.Course Code: MS30H (MGMT 3008) • understand current and evolving issues in informationCourse Title: EVENT MANAGEMENT security.Number of Credits: 3 • conduct security and disaster preparedness audits.Prerequisites: Completion of Level II of the Sports • design information security programmes using the securityManagement Programme or approval of the Head, systems development life cycle model.Department of Management Studies.Department Responsible: Management Studies Level: IIICourse Description: This course covers the purposes, types, Semester: Iorganization, administration and evaluation of events in relation Course Code: MS31B (MGMT 3011)to the hosting of sporting events. Areas such as networking Course Title: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS II(knowledge of the various groups required to support and stage (Analysis and Design)an event), promotion and marketing of events and the financial Number of Credits: 3ramifications of staging events will be emphasized. Prerequisites: MS21B (MGMT 2006) Department Responsible: Management StudiesLevel: III Course Description: This course addresses the need forSemester: I managers to understand the requirements for InformationCourse Code: MS30M (MKTG 3010) Systems, to participate in the design of systems and to manageCourse Title: INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION the procurement of systems.Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003) Level: IIIDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Semester: IICourse Description: The integrated marketing communication Course Code: MS31D (MGMT 3013)concept; the role of integrated marketing communication Course Title: DATABASE DESIGNin the marketing process; the communication process; goals AND BUSINESS APPLICATIONand objectives setting; budgeting; creative strategy planning Number of Credits: 3and development; the role of advertising agencies and other Prerequisites: MS21B (MGMT 2006)marketing communication organizations; media selection; Department Responsible: Management Studiesthe integrated marketing communication mix elements; the Course Description: This course examines the use of databasemeasurement of effectiveness; quantitative and qualitative systems in Business, the design of database systems, and theirresearch in integrated marketing communication; the particular strengths for strategic management.regulatory framework. 77
  • 78. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: MS31H (MGMT 3016) Course Code: MS32B (MGMT 3018)Course Title: E-COMMERCE SITE DESIGN Course Title: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONSAND IMPLEMENTATION Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS22A (MGMT 2008)Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003), MS21B (MGMT 2006) Co-requisite: MS32A (MGMT 3017)AND MS21E (MGMT 2007) Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: This course covers areas like the originsCourse Description: This course is intended to teach students and development of trade unions and employer associations,how to create and manage e-commerce enabled websites. systems of industrial relations in the Commonwealth Caribbean,Topics to be covered include: Usability Testing; Graphic Programs; collective bargaining, contract administration and disputesDeveloping in Hypertext Mark up Language (HTML); Microsoft settlement procedures, nature and causes of industrial conflict,FrontPage (XML); Creating On-Line Catalogues; Creating Labour and the Law, public policy and industrial relations andPayment Gateways; Implementing Transaction Security. other topical issues in industrial relations.Level: III Level: IIISemester: Semester:Course Code: MS31E (MGMT 3014) (NOT OFFERED) Course Code: MS32D (MGMT 3021) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: MANAGEMENT MICROCOMPUTER Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL THEORYAPPLICATIONS Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS12A (MGMT 1001) ORPrerequisites: MS21B (MGMT 2006) SY13E (SOCI 1002)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: A practical course to prepare students for Course Description: Organizations permeate all aspects of ourthe use of computers in the workplace. The focus is on the use of life – society as a whole, and the economy. This course seeks tomicrocomputer software packages in Management. help the student understand how and why organizations are structured the way they are.Level: IIISemester: II Level: IIICourse Code: MS31G (ACCT 3015) Semester: IICourse Title: ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Code: MS32E (MGMT 3022)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENTPrerequisites: MS21B (MGMT 2006) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Management Studies Prerequisites: MS12A (MGMT 1001) ORCourse Description: This course provides an in-depth SY13E (SOCI 1002) AND MS22A (MGMT 2008)examination of the use of information in the Accounting and Department Responsible: Management StudiesFinancial Management functions of an organization. The Course Description: The objectives of this course are todevelopment and application of information technology used in evaluate the various theoretical underpinnings and practicalthis field is studied. Practical training using current Accounting applications of Organization Development (O.D); to developand Financial Analysis software is provided. participants’ skills in diagnosing problem areas, recommending and implementing appropriate strategies for change inLevel: III organizations; to examine the various implications of changeSemester: I for the organization and employees.Course Code: MS32A (MGMT 3017)Course Title: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS22A (MGMT 2008)Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course provides participants witha broad overview of issues pertaining to human resourcemanagement with special reference to the Caribbeanenvironment.78
  • 79. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I & II Semester: IICourse Code: MS32H (MGMT 3024) Course Code: MS32N (MGMT 3027)Course Title: BUSINESS COMMUNICATION Course Title: SPORTS MARKETING ANDNumber of Credits: 3 PUBLIC RELATIONSPrerequisites: None Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Management Studies Prerequisites: MS20A (MGMT 2003) or approval ofCourse Description: Business Communication is designed the Head, Department of Management Studies. Thisto expose students to the various form’s and techniques of course will normally be open only to studentswritten, oral and interpersonal communications, in business pursuing the Sports Management Major or Minor.and management. Emphasis is on group and individual practice Department Responsible: Management Studiesand application in a variety of simulated and actual business Course Description: Integrating the unique productsituations. characteristics of sport with traditional marketing theory, this course aims to develop a framework for strategic decision makingLevel: III in the field of Sports Marketing and Public Relations. EmphasisSemester: II will be placed on the identification of market opportunities,Course Code: MS32K (MGMT 3025) the strategies to be used in exploring these opportunities andCourse Title: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT the establishment of mechanisms for on going education andNumber of Credits: 3 adjustments of strategies. Topics to be covered include: sportsPrerequisites: consumer behaviour; sport market segmentation; promotionalCo-requisite: MS32A (MGMT 3017) strategies; sponsorship; market research; pricing strategies;Department Responsible: Management Studies promotional strategies; public relations and publicity.Course Description: This course is designed to expose studentsto the issues, techniques and skills associated specifically with Level: IIIthe training and development function in organizations. It will Semester: Iexpand on the Human Resource Development module covered Course Code: MS32P (MGMT 3028)in the capstone Human Resource Management course. Course Title: PHYSICAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN SPORT/FACILITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENTLevel: III Number of Credits: 3Semester: I Prerequisites: MS22M (MGMT 2010), MS27E (MGMTCourse Code: MS32M (MGMT 3026) 2022) AND MS28G (MGMT 2025) and normally openCourse Title: HUMAN RESOURCES only to students pursuing the Sports ManagementMANAGEMENT IN SPORTS Major or Minor.Number of Credits: 3 Department Responsible: Management StudiesPrerequisites: MS12A (MGMT 1001), MS22M (MGMT Course Description: This course will focus on the planning2010) and normally open only to students and management of sport and recreational facilities. Topics topursuing the Sports Management Major or Minor. be covered include: planning the sports facility (accessibility,Department Responsible: Management Studies parking, geographic location); the facility layout; the facilityCourse Description: This course will focus on the Human image (appearance, amenities offered, personnel); blue printingResource Management challenges likely to be faced by the service delivery system; the management of risk at sportmanagement professionals in the field of sport. Emphasis facilities; feasibility study; marketing of the sport facility andwill be placed on developing skills in selecting, motivating, ticket sales strategy.evaluating and rewarding personnel in sports. Attention willalso be focused on the management of volunteers, job analysisand design, employee empowerment, the management ofdiversity and dealing with problem employees. 79
  • 80. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: MS32R (MGMT 3029) Course Code: MS33C (MGMT 3032)Course Title: INTERNSHIP IN SPORT Course Title: ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIESNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: Completion of Level II of the Sports Prerequisites: MS22A (MGMT 2008) ANDManagement Programme. MS28D (MGMT 2023)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This internship is designed to expose Course Description: Students will be exposed to the followingthe student to the real-world sport management setting and topics: Perspective in Entrepreneurship; the Entrepreneur’swill provide a bridge between academic studies and practice. mind, the Entrepreneurial Manager; the New Venture Team;During their attachment to the various organizations, students New Venture Ideas; Recognizing, shaping and evaluatingwill work under the supervision of appropriate professionals opportunities; The Start up Process; Valuation Techniques; theand will be required to prepare a written report/paper based Organization Plan; The Business Plan for Raising Capital andon their experience and incorporating relevant theory provided Guiding Growth; Alternative Sources of Financing and Obtainingin other courses. Students may work within a variety of sports Capital; Deal Structuring; Purchasing a Business; Franchising;settings, however, the chosen field must have prior approval Managing Growth.from the Sport and Physical Education Centre and/or the *TTHTI courseDepartment of Management Studies. Level: IIILevel: III Semester: I & IISemester: Course Code: MS33K (MGMT 3035)Course Code: MS33A (MGMT 3030) (NOT OFFERED) Course Title: ETHICS IN BUSINESSCourse Title: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: NonePrerequisites: MS22A (MGMT 2008), MS20A (MGMT Department Responsible: Management Studies2003) AND MS28D (MGMT 2023) Course Description: This course aims to expose students toDepartment Responsible: Management Studies the knowledge and skills necessary to think through difficultCourse Description: This course focuses on the critical issues ethical decisions encountered in organizational life and torelating to Small Business Management particularly in the make responsible decisions. It seeks to develop standardscontext of the Caribbean environment. of professionalism that will allow the practitioner to identify, analyze and resolve ethical issues in business decision-making.Level: IIISemester: I & II Level: IIICourse Code: MS33B (MGMT 3031) Semester: IICourse Title: BUSINESS STRATEGY AND POLICY Course Code: MS34B (MGMT 3037)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENTPrerequisites: Any Five Level II core Management Number of Credits: 3courses Prerequisites: EC10D (ECON 1001) AND EC10F (ECONDepartment Responsible: Management Studies 1002), AND MS28D (MGMT 2023) OR MS20A (MGMT 2003)Course Description: This is an integrative course designed to Department Responsible: Management Studiesuse the knowledge and competence developed in other courses Course Description: This course provides students with ain the solution of general management problems. thorough grounding in the various aspects of international business; such as: • the forces of globalization • motives for and methods used in engaging in international business • the role of the state in the conduct of international business • The effects of socio-cultural systems within countries on the conduct of international business • Foreign exchange systems and institution to facilitate international transactions80
  • 81. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: MS34C (MGMT 3062) Course Code: MS34G (MGMT 3081)Course Title: COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT Course Title: CREDIT ANALYSIS AND LENDINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS22A (MGMT 2008) AND Prerequisites: MS13A (MGMT 1022),MS32A (MGMT 3017) MS 24C (MGMT 2031) AND MS28D (MGMT 2023)Department Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: The objective of this course is to familiarize Course Description: This course covers thestudents with the following: theories of compensation; principles and practice of:organization policies and its impact on compensation; • Business Lending: risk management at portfolio level; thebehavioural effects of compensation plans. principles of business lending: credit monitoring, control and recovery; borrowing requirements and credit risksLevel: III associated with differing types of business; specialistSemester: II services relevant to a lending situation;Course Code: MS34D (MGMT 3079) • Consumer credit: the effective management of risk withCourse Title: ADVANCED BANKING LAW the broadening of lending facilities to individual (non-Number of Credits: 3 business) customers.Prerequisites: MS24B (MGMT 2030) ANDMS27A (MGMT 2021) Level: IIIDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Semester: ICourse Description: This course is a following–up of “Banking Course Code: MS35F (ACCT 3041)law“ and takes into account the considerable changes in Course Title: ADVANCED ACCOUNTINGbanking law, regulation and practice that have taken place in Number of Credits: 3recent years. It puts a special emphasis on financial markets: Prerequisites: MS25B (ACCT 2015)New technology has revolutionized the nature and threatened Department Responsible: Management Studiesthe existence of traditional stock and exchanges; the course Course Description: This course deals with specific topics ofanalyzes how exchanges have responded to developments in advanced accounting theory and reporting. Emphasis is placedautomation, and the resultant laws and their enforcement. on specific issues that often face senior management personnel as well as the professional accountant.Level: IIISemester: II Level: IIICourse Code: MS34E (MGMT 3080) Semester: IICourse Title: BANK TREASURY MANAGEMENT Course Code: MS35J (ACCT 3040)Number of Credits: 3 Course Title: ACCOUNTING THEORYPrerequisites: MS13A (MGMT 1022) AND Number of Credits: 3MS24C (MGMT 2031) Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Co-requisite: MS35F (ACCT 3014)Course Description: This course is concerned with money Department Responsible: Management Studiesmarket, foreign exchange and capital market business from Course Description: This is a course for students specializingthe point of view of the bank. It covers treasury management in accounting. Its main objective is to develop the students’of financial services institutions; banking and investment understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of thesupervision and regulation; market practice and procedures. contemporary approach to financial reporting, together with the political and pragmatic considerations in the development of its framework and standards. Level: III Semester: II Course Code: MS35K (ACCT 3039) Course Title: ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS25H (ACCT 2021) Co-requisite: MS35F (ACCT 3041) Department Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: The course integrates topics covered in previous accounting courses as well as related fields of finance, managerial economics, quantitative analysis and M.I.S. 81
  • 82. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: MS36B (ACCT 3043) Course Code: MS38D (MGMT 3050)Course Title: AUDITING I Course Title: INVESTMENT AND ANALYSISNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS27A (MGMT 2021) Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023)Co-requisite: MS35F (ACCT 3041) AND Department Responsible: Management StudiesMS37B (MGMT 3046) Course Description: This course discusses investment functionsDepartment Responsible: Management Studies and explains the nature of the decision-making process. ItCourse Description: This course introduces the students to provides a frame of reference in which the students can makeauditing. It attempts to provide the background they need to a value judgment based upon returns and risks of investment.exercise judgment in the determination of the nature and the The course is designed to bring the principles of investmentamount of evidence that auditors should accumulate after and good theory into the practical decision-making process.considering the unique circumstances of each engagement. Level: IIILevel: III Semester: IISemester: Course Code: MS38E (MGMT 3051)Course Code: MS36D (MGMT 3082) Course Title: TAXATION I(NOT OFFERED this year) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: AUDITING II Prerequisites: NoneNumber of Credits: 3 Department Responsible: Management StudiesPrerequisites: None Course Description: This course provides an overview of theCo-requisite: MS36B (ACCT 3043) methods that governments use to raise revenue throughDepartment Responsible: Management Studies taxation. The role that taxation plays in society in the developedCourse Description: The course seeks to encourage students countries and underdeveloped countries is examined.to develop a questioning attitude and to provide them witha thorough understanding of auditing that will allow them Level: IIIto deal with the problems that confront them as the auditing Semester: Ienvironment continues to change. Course Code: MS38G (MGMT 3083) Course Title: PROJECT ANALYSIS AND FINANCELevel: III Number of Credits: 3Semester: I Prerequisites: MS23C (MGMT 2012) ANDCourse Code: MS37B (MGMT 3046) MS28D (MGMT 2023)Course Title: COMPANY LAW Department Responsible: Management StudiesNumber of Credits: 3 Course Description: This course is concerned with thePrerequisites: None formulation of projects and the evaluation of their profitabilityDepartment Responsible: Management Studies from both the private and social viewpoint.Course Description: Partnership and Company law.Proceedingsagainst partners and proof of partnership and separate debts in Level: IIIbankruptcy. Companies registered under the relevant legislation Semester: Iin force in the Caribbean area. Formation and flotation, ultra Course Code: MS38H (MGMT 3048)vires. Meetings and resolutions. Course Title: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT II Number of Credits: 3LEVEL: III Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023) ANDSEMESTER: II MS26A (MGMT 2032)COURSE CODE: MS37C (MGMT 3047) Department Responsible: Management StudiesCOURSE TITLE: INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL Course Description: This course is concerned with the majorTRANSACTIONS skills needed for a senior financial officer with respect to short-NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3 term. financial operations (working capital management andPRE-REQUISITES: MS27A (MGMT 2021) financing) and long-term. financial operations (capital structure,DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: MANAGEMENT STUDIES financing options) and introduces some international financeCourse Description: Building on the foundation of the issues. Students will learn how to apply their learning in real-course on Business Law, this course introduces the student to world examples.some of the practical aspects of commercial law, mainly froman international perspective. The focus will be on preparingand negotiating contracts, fulfilling financial obligations intransnational transactions, resolving disputes, tendering forgoods and services, and the growing body of internationalprinciples applicable to commercial transactions.82
  • 83. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: Semester: ICourse Code: MS38K (MGMT 3084) Course Code: MS38Q (MGMT 3085)(NOT OFFERED this year) Course Title: DERIVATIVES MARKETSCourse Title: TAXATION II Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023) ANDPrerequisites: None EC24C (ECON 2016)Co-requisite: MS38E (MGMT 3051) Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provideCourse Description: This course introduces the student to the students with the necessary skills to value and to employtax management practices for individuals, sole proprietors and options, futures, and related financial contracts. In order tocorporations and exposes students to specialist tax areas. provide a useful treatment of these topics in an environment that is changing rapidly, it is necessary to stress the fundamentalsLevel: III and to study some important applications. The topics that willSemester: II be covered are:Course Code: MS38L (MGMT 3055) • Futures Markets and Their Applications, including theCourse Title: APPLIED TOPICS IN CORPORATE FINANCE pricing and the use of futures contracts on stock indices,Number of Credits: 3 on commodities, and Treasury instruments;Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023) and • Options Markets and Their Applications, covering theMS38H (MGMT 3048) valuation and use of options, including a discussion ofDepartment Responsible: Management Studies the empirical evidence and dynamic asset allocationCourse Description: This capstone course applies the basic strategies;financial theory covered in Financial Management I and II to the • Swaps, Complex Derivatives, Structured Securities includingsolution of real world issues encountered by financial managers. several cases, and the use (and misuse) of derivatives in theThe CASE METHOD is used to enhance the students’ ability to context of corporate applications.develop business judgment in financial issues and to enable thedevelopment of plans that are implementable. Level: III Semester:Level: III Course Code: MS39D (MGMT 3086)Semester: (NOT OFFERED this year)Course Code: MS38M (MGMT 3054) Course Title: ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND(NOT OFFERED this year) NEW VENTURE MANAGEMENTCourse Title: CAPITAL BUDGETING Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023), MS20A (MGMTPrerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023) and 2003), MS25C (ACCT 2017) AND MS22A (MGMT 2008)MS38H (MGMT 3048) Department Responsible: Management StudiesDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Course Description: Perspective in Entrepreneurship; TheCourse Description: This course is concerned with developing Entrepreneur’s Mind, The Entrepreneurial Manager; The Newthe finance skills learned in Financial Management I and II in Venture Team. New Venture Ideas; Recognizing, Shaping andthe area of Capital Budgeting. Students will be familiar with Evaluating Opportunities. The Start-up Process; Valuationprocedures to evaluate the correct cost of capital and how to Techniques, The Organization Plan. The Business Plan for Raisingevaluate appropriate cash flows and correctly analyze them. Capital and Guiding Growth. Alternative Sources of Financing and Obtaining Capital; Deal Structuring. Purchasing a Business;Level: III Franchising; Managing Growth.Semester: i (Evening univ.); semester Ii (full-time)Course Code: MS38N (MGMT 3053)Course Title: INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS28D (MGMT 2023) ANDMS28E (MGMT 2024)Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: This course is concerned with broadeningthe understanding of financial techniques and Financial Marketsin a wider geographic context. Students will gain knowledge ofInternational Financial Markets and learn how to analyze multi-currency issues. 83
  • 84. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: CERTIFICATESemester: I Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Code: MS39M (MGMT 3057) Course Code: MS41A (MGMT 0411)Course Title: PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS Course Title: MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTINGNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: MS23C (MGMT 2012) Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Management Studies Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeCourse Description: This course is intended to present Course Description: This course seeks to introduce the studentstudents with an up-to-date view of primary activities of to mathematical techniques that will be useful for computerthe production/operations functions in organizations. The operations. The course provides a good foundation for coursesproduction/ operations function is an area of management that in Levels I and II of the CMIS programme. Course coveragehas a profound effect on efficiency, productivity and the quality will include simple arithmetic, percentages and powers, baseof our daily lives. Focusing on Caribbean economies, the course numbers, fixed-length computer calculations, floating-pointwill examine the resources that are required in the production of numbers, basic statistics, probability, calculating averages,goods and services and illustrate the method of their acquisition measures of spread or dispersion, algebraic terminology andutilization, and upkeep. The topics to be covered will be shown simple manipulations, solving equations, use of graphs forto apply not only to the manufacturing sector but to the service estimation, sets and Venn diagrams, Boolean algebra and use ofsectors as well such as banks, hospitals, etc. logic, arrays and, error and its control.Level: III Level: CERTIFICATESemester: II Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Code: MS39P (MGMT 3060) Course Code: MS41B (MGMT 0412)Course Title: OPERATIONS, PLANNING AND CONTROL Course Title: FOUNDATIONS OFNumber of Credits: 3 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYPrerequisites: MS39M (MGMT 3057) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Management Studies Prerequisites: NoneCourse Description: Building on the earlier course in Production Department Responsible: Faculty Officeand Operations Management, this course is intended to Course Description: The course exposes the student toillustrate the array of planning and control techniques available the basics of computer literacy, the types of computersto management to ensure the maximum productivity, quality, (microcomputers,minicomputers,mainframes,supercomputers)efficiency and profitability of the various operation systems and computer components (hardware and software). Additionalinvolved in the production of goods and services. topics that will be covered include information storage and accessing data, main memory and types of memory, input andLevel: III output devices, secondary storage, systems software (operatingSemester: YEAR LONG systems, language translators, utility programs), applicationCourse Code: MGMT 3087 evaluation and viruses. In addition, students will be exposed toCourse Title: ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION software such as DOS, WINDOWS, WORDPERFECT/MICROSOFTNumber of Credits: 6 WORD, LOTUS/EXCEL, and DBASE/ACCESS.Prerequisites: NONEDepartment Responsible: CENTRE FOR Level: CERTIFICATEENTREPRENEURSHIP, innovation and wealth creation Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Description: The course will address key challenges Course Code: MS42A (MGMT 0421)facing a start-up venture: from opportunity recognition and Course Title: DESIGNING INFORMATION SYSTEMS Iassessment, strategic positioning and business model selection. Number of Credits: 3The course analyses dynamics that allow a firm or individual Prerequisites: Noneto evolve survive and compete in a global competitive Department Responsible: Faculty Officeenvironment.This learning process is interpreted along a range of Course Description: This course introduces students to thedimensions including critical thinking, knowledge management, people in information systems (the project team), structuredchange management and innovation management, and is design concepts, the systems development life cycle, systemscontextualized within the current framework of the knowledge analysis (problem definition, feasibility study and logical design),society of the information age. Entrepreneurship is interpreted systems design (data descriptions, systems flowcharts, hardwareas a holistic and systemic approach required of persons who and software specifications). Students will be required to do awish to create and sustain an effective business. project.84
  • 85. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: CERTIFICATE Level: CERTIFICATESemester: “SUMMER” ONLY Semester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Code: MS42B (MGMT 0422) Course Code: MS43C (MGMT 0433)Course Title: INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN BUSINESS Course Title: DESIGNING INFORMATION SYSTEMS IINumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: MS42A (MGMT 0421)Department Responsible: Faculty Office Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeCourse Description: The course is geared towards giving Course Description: Students will be exposed to systemsstudents an understanding of information systems, the various development and systems implementation, systemstypes of information systems and their uses, and the people maintenance, prototyping, computer-aided softwareinvolved in the creation of information systems. Students will engineering and CASE methodology, program designs andtherefore cover topics such as the data processing cycle, the program writing, and programming languages.need for information, functions and levels of management: thedecision-making process - types of management decisions. Level: IThere will also be further use of DOS, WINDOWS, WORDPERFECT Semester: IIor MICROSOFT WORD, LOTUS or EXCEL, and DBASE/ACCESS. Course Code: PS11B (PSYC 1004) Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGYLevel: CERTIFICATE Number of Credits: 3Semester: “SUMMER” ONLY Prerequisites: NoneCourse Code: MS42C (MGMT 0423) Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Title: COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS Course Description: This course seeks to introduce studentsNumber of Credits: 3 to the field of Social Psychology as the scientific study of howPrerequisites: None people think about, influence, and relate to one another whileDepartment Responsible: Faculty Office introducing its scope of study and its methodology. This courseCourse Description: This course is intended to expose students intends to give students an appreciation for the combinedto various forms of business communication, both verbal and analysis of psychological and sociological perspectives innonverbal. Upon completion of the course, students should studying human behaviour. Social Psychology will, therefore,be able to prepare summaries, business letters, reports, essays, be constructed as an interactionist discipline.projects and papers and also make oral presentations. Students will be exposed to numerous social psychologicalLevel: CERTIFICATE concepts, particularly in the light of empirical research, includingSemester: “SUMMER” ONLY primary and secondary socialization and its consequencesCourse Code: MS43A (MGMT 0431) in relationships; self and personality development; attitudeCourse Title: DATA COMMUNICATION AND formation and measurement; persuasion; conformity,DISTRIBUTED DATA PROCESSING compliance, obedience and deviance; group behaviour;Number of Credits: 3 interpersonal relations; impression formation, aggression andPrerequisites: None altruistic behaviour.Department Responsible: Faculty OfficeCourse Description: Topics to be covered include the Each topic will be covered in sufficient depth for students totransmission of data and transmission media, data be able to appreciate classical social psychological conceptscommunication conventions, managing communication traffic, and findings. Students will also develop a keen appreciationcommunication networks (e.g. LANs, WANs), centralized and for social psychology as a tool for national, as well as personaldistributed data systems and distributed data. development.Level: CERTIFICATESemester: “SUMMER” ONLYCourse Code: MS43B (MGMT 0432)Course Title: DATA STORAGE AND MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Faculty OfficeCourse Description: This course exposes students to thefollowing topics: storage technology (magnetic tape, magneticdisk, optical disk), file organization: (sequential, direct), datamanagement and database management systems (DBMS), typesof DBMS and DBMS software, organizational and proceduralcontrols in DBMS design and use, and DBMS evaluation. Thiscourse has a project component. 85
  • 86. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: I Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: PS14A (PSYC 1003) Course Code: PS20C (PSYC 2016)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Course Title: SENSATION AND PERCEPTIONNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: None Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: The concepts and practice of psychology Course Description: Sensation includes all of the biologicalare becoming increasingly important in our society. This course mechanisms that detect physical stimuli and translate themallows students to gain an understanding of basic principles into neural activity. Perception refers to the processes thein psychology. It also illustrates some basic techniques of brain uses to actively interpret sensory information, and form.measuring human behaviour. An attempt will also be made to a representation of the external world. The study of sensationindicate where psychological principles could play an effective and perception is rich with tradition, having roots in philosophy,part in understanding and solving certain problems. biology, and psychology. More recently there has been additional influence from computer science and engineering, in an attemptThe course is organized into seven sections. An attempt will to make machines that can extract and utilize information fromalso be made to use a multi-disciplinary approach through the environment. The focus of this course will be the biologyillustrations. The theme of humanistic psychology will be and theories of sensation and perception and , in particular, theused alongside the Freudian and Behaviouristic approaches experimental evidence on which our understanding is based.to explore whether human beings have the inherent nature totranscend the environment or to remain always at the mercy Level: IIof environmental forces. Among the topic areas dealt with in Semester: Ithis course are: sensation and perception, learning, motivation, Course Code: PS24A (PSYC 2004)memory, emotions, intelligence, personality, development and Course Title: PERSONALITY THEORYresearch methods. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)This course is a prerequisite for all other second and third year Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencespsychology courses. Students are expected to attend all lectures Course Description: The psychological approach to personality.and undertake consistent reading on their own. How personality is defined and measured: A comparison of selected theories in personality (e.g. Erikson, Freud, Rogers). ALevel: II central issue is: the relationship between the social environmentSemester: II and personality formation.Course Code: PS20B (PSYC 2015)Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO Level: IICOGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Semester: INumber of Credits: 3 Course Code: PS24B (PSYC 2010)Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Course Title: STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN INDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences PSYCHOLOGYCourse Description: What’s going on inside my head when I try Number of Credits: 3to solve this calculus problem? How do I remember where I last Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)left my bicycle? How do I understand this paragraph of text? This AND EC160 (ECON 1005) OR SOCI 1005course addresses such questions. Cognitive psychology deals Department Responsible: Behavioural Scienceswith how the mind works and what Mechanisms operate when Course Description: Parametric and non-parametric statisticalwe solve problems, or remember, and how we use language. procedures and their descriptive and inferential applicationThis course will introduce students to the major concepts to behavioural research are applied to a variety of researchand theories of cognitive psychology including decision questions and experimental designs emphasizing those usedmaking, language, and thinking as well as to the research and in psychological research. Computer programming for dataexperimental methods used in the discipline. organization and analysis is taught. Concepts and techniques learnt in this course are generously applied throughout later psychology courses.86
  • 87. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: PS24C (PSYC 2003) Course Code: PS24F (PSYC 2002)Course Title: PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Course Title: ABNORMAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGYNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: The relationship between neuro- Course Description: The first section deals with testsbiological processes and psychological processes is examined. of personality which are used within the clinic. StudentsThis course focuses on the organization of the nervous system, critically appraise and administer them. The second deals withthe role of the neurobiological process in sensory experiences, psychological abnormalities. Students recognise and identifysleep, attention, arousal, motivation, emotions, learning, them; recognise the level of assistance required in dealing withmemory and language. Both experimental and clinical data are them and the impact of psychological disorders on other familyconsidered. members; understand some of their causes.Level: II Level: IIISemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: PS24D (PSYC 2011) Course Code: PS30G (PSYC 3021)Course Title: SELECTED THEORIES IN SOCIAL Course Title: MOTIVATION AND EMOTIONSPSYCHOLOGY Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course seeks to assist students inCourse Description: This course presents students with an understanding the psychological bases for human motivationoverview of the theories and content areas in social psychology. and emotion. Theoretical as well as experimental pointsSocial psychology is the broadest of the branches of psychology, of view will be considered ranging from the infancy of theanalyzing how the individual influences, and is in turn influenced subject to present time. It begins by examining the historicalby the actual or imagined presence of others. This course gives underpinnings of the subject, then analyzing the basic drivesstudents an understanding of the processes and forces that that we possess, continuing with our emotions, the brain andshape and are shaped by human interaction. its role in feeling, mood disorders, motivation and finally social interaction that is emotionally charged.Core topics will include: attribution theories, social exchangetheories, field theory, consistency theories, reactance theory, Level: IIItheories on self, social comparison theory, social cognition and Semester: Isocial perception. Course Code: PS30H (PSYC 3026) Course Title: HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGYThe course is divided into four sections. These sections will Number of Credits: 3introduce students to specific theories and concepts in social Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)psychology. All lectures and tutorials are essential. Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: The purpose of this course is to familiariseLevel: II students with the various systems of thought that haveSemester: I developed over the lifespan of psychology from its philosophicalCourse Code: PS24E (PSYC 2012) origins to recent perspectives. This course will primarily relyCourse Title: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY upon readings, class presentation, and class discussion toNumber of Credits: 3 convey this body of knowledge.Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course focuses on theories andpatterns of human development from pre-natal stages to oldage. The interplay between cultural norm’s and psychologicalpatterns is examined, and the factors related to healthy growthand development from an individual and a societal perspectiveare explored. The course also examines preventive andrehabilitative measures. 87
  • 88. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: I Semester: IICourse Code: PS30J (PSYC 3022) Course Code: PS34B (PSYC 3014)Course Title: LEARNING AND MEMORY Course Title: INDUSTRIAL ANDNumber of Credits: 3 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGYPrerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Course Description: This course looks at similarities and Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesdifferences between behavioral and cognitive approaches Course Description: This course explores the applications ofto a variety of topics, beginning with classical and operant psychological theories and concepts to problems encounteredconditioning, proceeding to verbal learning and concept in work environments with special reference to the Caribbean.learning, and ending with coverage of memory and forgetting.A theme that will be developed is that the two approaches are Level: IIIbetter seen as complementary than as competitive and that Semester:one gets a more comprehensive picture of the learning process Course Code: PS34C (PSYC 3024) (NOT OFFERED)by considering both approaches than one alone. Course Title: PSYCHOLOGY OF ETHNIC RELATIONS Number of Credits: 3Level: III Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Semester: I Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Code: PS33F (PSYC 3023) Course Description: The psychological dynamics of prejudiceCourse Title: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN and theories of racial prejudice are examined in the contextSOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY of attitude formation and change. An examination of theNumber of Credits: 3 psychological impact which the history and economic structurePrerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) of Caribbean societies have on race relations.Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course emphasizes the linkages Level: IIIbetween social psychological theory and social issues. It Semester: IIillustrates how social psychological theories and/or principles Course Code: PS34D (PSYC 3002)(for example, equity theory, dissonance reduction, prejudice etc.) Course Title: ADVANCED TOPICS IN PERSONALITYcan be applied to help understand and solve social problems Number of Credits: 3(e.g. poverty, crime, racism) in Caribbean societies, Trinidad and Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)Tobago in particular. Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course examines personality theories,Level: III personality characteristics including traits, aptitudes, values,Semester: II style and interests, the role of personal factors, biologicalCourse Code: PS34A (PSYC 3004) and environmental influences on personality. Definitions ofCourse Title: EXPERIMENTAL AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY personality derived from classical and modern theorists areNumber of Credits: 3 examined. Emphasis is placed on primary sources.Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)AND EC160 (ECON 1005) OR SOCI 1005 Level: IIIDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Semester: IICourse Description: Students acquire basic skills in Course Code: PS34E (PSYC 3003)psychological experimentation and also an understanding of Course Title: Community & ENVIRONMENTALhow psychological concepts can be applied towards solving PSYCHOLOGYhuman problems. Experimental work will emphasize theories Number of Credits: 3and concepts obtained from psychology courses previously Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004)or concurrently taken, showing the value and implications of Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesexperimental work in psychology. Course Description: Theories developed in a variety of areas – social psychology, sociology, ethnology, political science, architecture and anthropology are synthesized to understand and assess the interaction between the individual and his environment.88
  • 89. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: ISemester: Semester: IICourse Code: PS34F (PSYC 3000) (NOT OFFERED) Course Code: SW18B (SOWK 1007)Course Title: PSYCHOLOGY OF POLITICS Course Title: LAW FOR SOCIAL WORKERSNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Prerequisites: NoneDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course uses theories and research Course Description: An introduction to legal principles andfindings from psychology (e.g. attitude formation, leadership, Social Legislation in the West Indies, the Court System (includinggroup dynamics, persuasion) to understand and explain political Tribunals); Professional Role of the Social Worker in court inbehaviour. term’s of duty to the Court and to the client, the importance of the Social Enquiry Report. Laws relating to the Family, the AgedLevel: III and Juvenile Crime.Semester: (YEAR LONG)Course Code: PS320 (PSYC 3025) Level: ICourse Title: RESEARCH PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY Semester: IINumber of Credits: 6 Course Code: SW19C (SOWK 1010)Prerequisites: PS14A (PSYC 1003) OR PS11B (PSYC 1004) Course Title: PRACTICUM 1AND PS24B (PSYC 2010) (Students are required to completeDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences 168 contact hours)Course Description: In order to pursue this course, students Number of Credits: 3must be in Level 3 registered in the Psychology (Major/ Prerequisites: SW17A (SOWK 1001)Specialization) Programme. A project to develop student’s Co-requisite: SW17B (SOWK 1003)capability in formulating research themes, data collection and Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesanalysis from a psychological perspective. This full year course Course Description: Students registered for SW19C areinvolves seminar-type classes and close frequent consultations required to read SW17B concurrently, and must have successfullywith a Project Supervisor from the Department’s staff. Such completed SW17A.research projects are normally carried out at the PsychologicalResearch Centre. Level: II Semester: IILevel: I Course Code: SW24A (SOWK 2007)Semester: I Course Title: SOCIAL DIABILITY STUDIESCourse Code: SW17A (SOWK 1001) Number of Credits: 3Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK Prerequisites: NONENumber of Credits: 3 Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesPrerequisites: None Course Description: This course introduces the student toDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Disability Studies. It identifies the ways in which differentlyCourse Description: This course covers the practice of social abled persons are marginalized and restricted and experiencework in a developmental context with specific reference to the discrimination within an unadaptive society. Via descriptions ofCaribbean region. It treats specific developmental and social the current status of persons with disabilities in the Caribbeanproblems, the existing structure of social work in selected context, it examines the interaction of persons with disabilitiescountries, and the history of the development of social work. within the existing political, social and cultural and legalThe course includes visits to selected social agencies followed systems. The historical struggles for rights and services by theby class discussion and report writing. disabled are highlighted. Policy needs for future development are outlined. This course is taught in partnership with personsLevel: I with disabilities and is grounded in the epistemological beliefSemester: II that the creation of knowledge about disability should be with/Course Code: SW17B (SOWK 1003) by people with disabilities.Course Title: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK INumber of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SW17A (SOWK 1001)Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course examines and explorestheories of Social Work and their applicability in shaping theSocial worker’s response to the developmental imperatives ofCaribbean people. The helping relationship in this context iscritically appraised, exploring the processes of interviewing,relationship building, strategies of empowerment, assessmentand intervention planning. 89
  • 90. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IIISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: SW27A (SOWK 2000) Course Code: SW30A (SOWK 3009)Course Title: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK II Course Title: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK IVNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SW17A (SOWK 1001) AND Prerequisites: SW27A (SOWK 2000) andSW17B (SOWK 1003) SW27B (SOWK 2003)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: A critical appraisal of theories of social Course Description: This course deals primarily with the theorywork is continued. The skills and knowledge of the social worker; and practice of community organization and change – basicbasic principles of social case work, development of practice concepts, assumptions, values and ethics, strategies and skillsskills for working with individuals and families, are explored in are examined. Contemporary community organization practicesgeneral and analyzed within the Caribbean context. are examined and their relevance to the developmental needs of Caribbean societies is explored. Students undertake this criticalLevel: II appraisal both in the classroom and through engagement in aSemester: II community group project in selected communities.Course Code: SW27B (SOWK 2003)Course Title: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK III Level: IIINumber of Credits: 3 Semester: IIPrerequisites: SW17A (SOWK 1001), Course Code: SW30B (SOWK 3011)SW17B (SOWK 1003) AND SW27A (SOWK 2000) Course Title: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK VDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences (HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE)Course Description: The course examines the concepts and Number of Credits: 3theoretical foundations of practice with groups in Social Work. Prerequisites: SW27A (SOWK 2000), SW27B (SOWK 2003)It focuses primarily on the small group, examining stages of AND SW30A (SOWK 3009)development, group dynamics, functions, types and intervention Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesmodalities and skills used in working in this modality. Course Description: Students acquire a critical understanding of, and operational skills in, Human Resource ManagementLevel: II and Management of Social Work practice. The course focusesSemester: (YEAR LONG) on key issues in the management of practice and inductionCourse Code: SW290 (SOWK 2008) of beginning practitioners, and on the basic elements of theCourse Title: PRACTICUM II AND PRACTICUM III personnel function with an overview of the personnel function(Year long: Students are required to complete 336 in Trinidad & Tobago.contact hours). This course extends from Januaryto April. Level: IIINumber of Credits: 6 Semester: IIPrerequisites: SW17A (SOWK 1001), Course Code: SW31A (SOWK 3016)SW17B (SOWK 1003), SW19C (SOWK 1010) Course Title: RESIDENTIAL SOCIAL WORKCo-requisiteS: SW27A (SOWK 2000) and Number of Credits: 3SW27B (SOWK 2003) Prerequisites: PS24E (PSYC 2012)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Students registered for SW290 (Year long Course Description: A general and comparative study ofpracticum II and III) are required to read SW27A and SW27B Institutional Care in relation to the child, the elderly, theconcurrently. physically and mentally handicapped and the adult offender.The primary purpose of the placement remains the development Special emphasis will be placed on Institutional Care in theof students’ practice skills. Students are encouraged throughout Caribbean. The course focuses on the practice skills required forthis placement to evaluate their own skill development institutional care.performance. Where possible Semester I will emphasize casework and Semester II will emphasize group work. SW290 will beassessed at 40% at the end of the first semester and 60% at theend of the second semester.90
  • 91. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: ISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: SW31B (SOWK 3002) Course Code: SY13E (SOCI 1002)Course Title: FAMILY AND CHILD WELFARE Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY INumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: PS24E (PSYC 2012) AND Prerequisites: NonePS24F (PSYC 2002) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: What is Sociology about? Structures ofCourse Description: This course explores the function of the Power. An analysis of social institutions and processes.family and various family form’s and structures, with specificreference to the Caribbean context. The course of study Level: Iexamines the scope of family treatment, theoretical approaches Semester: IIand several intervention modalities for families and children. Course Code: SY13F (SOCI 1000) Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY IILevel: III Number of Credits: 3Semester: I Prerequisites: NoneCourse Code: SW32B (SOWK 3012) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Title: GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL COUNSELLING Course Description: Sociological Perspectives. Major ThemesNumber of Credits: 3 on Social Change and Development in the modern world.Prerequisites: PS24E (PSYC 2012) ANDPS24F (PSYC 2002) LEVEL: IDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences SEMESTER: I & IICourse Description: This course examines several theoretical COURSE CODE: SOCI 1005approaches to group and individual counseling and the COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS FORappropriateness and validity of these modalities for varying THE BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCESclient populations. The applicability of these approaches and NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3concepts to the Caribbean context is critically analyzed. PREREQUISITES:  NONE Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesLevel: III Course Description:  Introduction to Statistics for theSemester: YEAR LONG Behavioural Sciences represents an attempt to understandCourse Code: SW350 (SOWK 3017) social and behavioural phenomena from a measurementCourse Title: PRACTICUM IV perspective.  Given the wide variation in measurement, based onNumber of Credits: 6 the nature of the population that is being measured, this coursePrerequisites: SW19C (SOWK 1010), SW290 will sensitize students to varying methods of data collection,(SOWK 2008), SW27A (SOWK 2000), SW27B (SOWK 2003) treatment and analysis consistent with ongoing changes andCo-requisite: SW30A (SOWK 3009) and variations in behavioural phenomena.  To this end, the objectiveSW30B (SOWK 3011) of this course is to train students to measure, understand andDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences interpret behavioural phenomena.Course Description: This course is oriented to the developmentof students’ research and practice skills in an employment Level: IIsetting. Semester: IStudents registered for SW350 are required to have successfully Course Code: SY20E (SOCI 2000)completed the following courses at the previous level: SW27A, Course Title: CLASSICAL SOCIAL THEORYSW27B and SW290. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)Level: III Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesSemester: II Course Description: This course introduces students to theCourse Code: SOWK 3019 works of pioneering sociological thinkers who dominatedCourse Title: SOCIAL WORK PRACtice IN sociological theorizing in the 19th and early 20th centuries,RURAL COMMUNITIES critically evaluating the theoretical contributions of AugustNumber of Credits: 3 Comte, Herbert Spencer, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Karl MarxPrerequisites: SW27A (SOWK 2000) and Vilfredo Pareto.Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course is designed to prepare studentsfor generalist social work practice in rural areas, and to familiarizestudents with issues unique to rural communities. Throughoutthe course, special emphasis will be given to the service needsof populations at risk and to the social service delivery issuesencountered in rural communities in the Caribbean. 91
  • 92. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IISemester: II Semester:Course Code: SY20F (SOCI 2001) Course Code: SY21H (SOCI 2003) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: MODERN SOCIAL THEORY Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF A DIASPORIC COMMUNITYNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Topics include Modern Structuralism: Course Description: This course exposes students to theStructural-functionalism; Conflict theory. Phenomenological dynamics of a diasporic community in a post-colonial democracy.and Interactionist perspectives: Ethnomethodology; Symbolic Focusing on the Caribbean region it deals with the processes ofInteractionism. Third World and Caribbean Perspectives: Frantz continuity and change among the people of Indian descent, andFanon and the Sociology of Colonialism; Pluralism, Creole and the issues confronting this community and the wider society inPlantation Society models and beyond. which it lives.Level: II Level: IISemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: SY21C (SOCI 2022) Course Code: SY22E (SOCI 2007)Course Title: SOCIAL GERONTOLGY Course Title: SURVEY DESIGN AND ANALYSISNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: NONE Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences AND EC160 (ECON 1005) OR SOCI 1005Course Description: This course is designed to introduce Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesstudents to the field of social gerontology and will focus on the Course Description: This course allows students to understandsocial dimensions of the ageing. Within this setting students the various interconnections betweens the methodologiesare introduced to the demographic, biological, psychological (used in survey designs) and reliability of findings. Students gainand sociological theories of ageing, the social attitudes towards hands-on experience with the computer, as it relates to the dataageing and the effects of these attitudes on older persons and entry of the actual survey which the student conducts in a testtheir participation in society. The major issues around the social of understanding phenomena and research.consequences of the policies for the elderly in the Caribbean arediscussed. This course contributes to an improved awareness Level: IIof the continuity of life and assists in dispelling fears and Semester: IImisconceptions of ageing. Through project activities, this Course Code: SY22F (SOCI 2006)course provides the opportunity to determine the extent to Course Title: QUALITATIVE METHODSwhich various theories on ageing apply to the Caribbean. IN SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH Number of Credits: 3Level: II Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)Semester: Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Code: SY21G (SOCI 2002) (NOT OFFERED) Course Description: This course exposes student to fieldCourse Title: SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF INDIAN research, both within the community and in organizations. TheDIASPORA object is to understand the meaning of the members’ world;Number of Credits: 3 how their perception images and interpretations shape thePrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) members and the wider community. Students are trained toDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences undertake qualitative research in this area by understandingCourse Description: This course introduces students to the phenomena in selected areas.sociological phenomenon of diaspora from a socio-historicalperspective. It focuses on the indentured immigration during Level: II1838-1917, especially to the Caribbean region, and the emergent Semester: Iscenario in the decades immediately following the abolition of Course Code: SY23C (SOCI 2010)the indenture system. Course Title: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE PEOPLES OF THE CARIBBEAN I Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: An introductory course which treats: 1. What is Anthropology? 2. Anthropological methods and their problems. 3. The cultural background of the Caribbean peoples. 4. The concepts of culture, culture contact, acculturation, interculturation, syncretism. 5. Identity, culture and Caribbean society.92
  • 93. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: II Level: IIiSemester: I Semester: ICourse Code: SY23F (SOCI 2012) Course Code: SY27D (SOCI 3039)Course Title: SOCIAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT Course Title: GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT:Number of Credits: 3 WITH REFERENCE TO CARIBBEAN SOCIETYPrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) Number of Credits: 3Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)Course Description: This course addresses the problematic, Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR GENDER ANDtheories, critiques of social development and considers relevant DEVELOPMENT STUDIES/Behavioural Sciencesstrategies. Course Description: This course traces the emergence of the specialized field of women/gender and development sinceLevel: II the 1970s. The feminist critique of ‘development’ is examinedSemester: I as well as the social, political and economic aspects of genderCourse Code: SY25A (SOCI 2023) relations and their relation to the so-called developmentCourse Title: SOCIAL POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION I process. The course has a practical focus and provides anNumber of Credits: 3 introduction to frameworks for gender analysis which influencePrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) AND SY13F (sOCI policy decisions.1000) OR SW17A (SOWK 1001) AND SW17B (SOWK 1003)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Level: IIICourse Description: Sub-theme – The Development of Social Semester: IPolicy. This introductory course is essential for a minor in a Social Course Code: SY30E (SOCI 3002)Policy. It covers the scope of social policy; the development of Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION I:the welfare state; history of social policy in Trinidad & Tobago PERSPECTIVES AND ISSUESand key theoretical concepts for understanding and delivering Number of Credits: 3social services. Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesLevel: II Course Description: Topics include: The growth andSemester: II development of Education as a distinct branch of study inCourse Code: SY25B (SOCI 2015) Sociology;Theoretical perspectives in the Sociology of Education;Course Title: SOCIAL POLICY ORGANIZATION AND Education and Society: Education and Social Stratification;ADMINISTRATION Education and gender; Education and race; Education and SocialNumber of Credits: 3 Change; The teaching profession; The school as an organization;Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) AND SY13F (sOCI The Sociology of Educational Knowledge.1000) OR SW17A (SOWK 1001) AND SW17B (SOWK 1003)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Level: IIICourse Description: Sub-theme – The organization of social Semester: IIservices. This course concentrates on the organization and Course Code: SY30F (SOCI 3003)delivery of social services for mezzo-policy practice. It examines Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION II: EDUCATIONthe range of social services that can assist to improve the well- AND SOCIETYbeing of persons in the society. These include private practice, Number of Credits: 3educational programmes, residential programmes, home Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000)services and development agencies within the NGO sector. Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: Topics include: Educational Systems inLevel: II developed and developing nations: An overview; EducationalSemester: II Systems in the Caribbean: Historical perspective; The schoolCourse Code: SY23D (SOCI 2011) system in the contemporary Caribbean with special referenceCourse Title: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE PEOPLES to Trinidad; Higher Education in the Caribbean: status and issues;OF THE CARIBBEAN II The teaching profession in the Caribbean; The role of EducationNumber of Credits: 3 in decolonisation; Main problematic issues in the contemporaryPrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000) Caribbean.Co-requisite: SY23C (SOCI 2010)Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Building on Anthropology of the Peoplesof the Caribbean I, students learn about some of the importantinstitutions and processes of social change in Caribbean society.Urbanization and the changing ethnic and class relations innamed Caribbean societies are considered, as are the varioustheoretical perspectives on the region, focusing on religion,the family, gender relations, “family land” “higglering” and “the ,informal sector”. 93
  • 94. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester:Course Code: SY31C (SOCI 3005) Course Code: SY32F (SOCI 3010) (NOT OFFERED)Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS Course Title: INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY II:Number of Credits: 3 SOCIOLOGY OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONSPrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); Number of Credits: 3AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) Prerequisites: SY20E (SOCI 2000) ANDDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences SY20F (SOCI 2001) OR MS32D (MGMT 3021)Course Description: This course enables students to identify Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciencesthe relationship between social factors and illness. It explains Course Description: As a follow up to SY32E, it focuses onhow age, sex, class, ethnicity and culture can determine how the issue of industrial relations and conflict drawing on thea disease can become prevalent in one group as opposed to Caribbean experience.another. It also highlights the relationship between doctor andpatient, and treats with the role of institutions such as hospitals, Level: IIInursing homes, and health organization and reorganization Semester: Iwithin the Caribbean and beyond. Course Code: SY35B (SOCI 3019) Course Title: SOCIAL POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION IILevel: III Number of Credits: 3Semester: II Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) AND SY13F (sOCICourse Code: SY31F (SOCI 3006) 1000) OR SW17A (SOWK 1001) AND SW17B (SOWK 1003)Course Title: THE THIRD WORLD IN Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesGLOBAL DEVELOPMENT Course Description: Sub-theme – Social Policy AnalysisNumber of Credits: 3 This course equips students with in-depth knowledge of thePrerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); contribution of social policy to social development. The courseAND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) content covers comparative social policy; the use of frameworksDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences for social policy analysis and detailed analysis of some selectedCourse Description: This course examines the current state of areas e.g. poverty, the family, housing, employment, social workworld development and the place of the Third World, in general services, mental health, the environment and cooperatives.and the English-speaking Caribbean in particular, within it. It isa companion to SY23F - Social Change and Development, and Level: IIItakes up the theme of fundamental changes in global techno- Semester: IIeconomic arrangements and their reflection in the nature of Course Code: SY35C (SOCI 3020)developmental theory. This is done through an examination of Course Title: SOCIAL POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION IIIcurrent social issues in Caribbean development. Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) AND SY13F (sOCILevel: III 1000) OR SW17A (SOWK 1001) AND SW17B (SOWK 1003)Semester: II Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Code: SY32E (SOCI 3008) Course Description: Sub-theme – Social PlanningCourse Title: INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY I: THEORY AND This course is designed to empower social developmentMETHODS workers to actively improve policy and planning skills. CourseNumber of Credits: 3 content covers social planning practice, current trends asPrerequisites: SY20E (SOCI 2000) AND gender planning, community care, sustainable development;SY20F (SOCI 2001) OR MS32D (MGMT 3021) and technical skills such as the preparation of appraisals andDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences evaluations.Course Description: This course focuses on the sociologicalstudy of work and industry. It assumes prior exposure to Level: IIISociological Theory or Organizational Theory and Behaviour Semester: Ias it seeks to apply those insights to the understanding of the Course Code: SY35E (SOCI 3023)structure and dynamics of work and industry. Course Title: POPULATION STUDIES I Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Course Description: This course provides students with an insight into how the study of human behaviour may be approached in a scientific way through the application of theories and methods which have been developed from the perspective of a phased schedule of activities.94
  • 95. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: IICourse Code: SY35F (SOCI 3037) Course Code: SY37C (SOCI 3030)Course Title: POPULATION STUDIES II Course Title: SOCIOLOGY OF PENAL PRACTICENumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000);AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Students make the linkage between Course Description: This course considers the sociologypopulation and other aspects of the universe,i.e.the environment, of policing, lower and higher courts, imprisonment, capitalthe economy etc. Next, considerations are given to the kinds of punishment, welfare alternatives to prison, and attemptspolicies and control measures which may be adopted in respect to develop popular justice. A considerable literature from aof the population growth phenomenon. Students consider the developmental perspective is available on the police, on courts,links between population and development and perform. basic and on alternative strategies.demographic techniques. Level: IIILevel: III Semester: IISemester: I Course Code: SY37G (SOCI 3031)Course Code: SY36E (SOCI 3028) Course Title: SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETYCourse Title: CARIBBEAN SOCIAL STRUCTURE I Number of Credits: 3Number of Credits: 3 Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000);Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) OR AR21CAND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) Department Responsible: CENTRE FOR GENDER ANDDepartment Responsible: Behavioural Sciences DEVELOPMENT STUDIES/ Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: Insights into Caribbean social structure Course Description: This course seeks to critically examine theand the advent of the colonists from the 16th to the 20th centuries sociological tradition of women, family and gender. It reviewsare offered, allowing students to understand the relationship the biological, anthropological and social approaches to theamong ethnicity, race, class and colour in West Indian societies, origins of sex differences and examines the changes in theand how the historical legacy of slavery and indentureship sexual division of labour in human history. Finally it examinesproduce cultural traditions and customs impacting on social the significance of sexuality and its control in the ordering andstructure and society. structure of society.Level: III Level: IIISemester: Semester: IICourse Code: SY36F (SOCI 3029) (NOT OFFERED) Course Code: SY37H (SOCI 3032)Course Title: CARIBBEAN SOCIAL STRUCTURE II Course Title: CRIMINOLOGYNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000); Prerequisites: SY13E (SOCI 1002) OR SY13F (sOCI 1000);AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001) AND SY20E (SOCI 2000) OR SY20F (SOCI 2001)Department Responsible: Behavioural Sciences Department Responsible: Behavioural SciencesCourse Description: This course shows the interrelationship Course Description: This course seeks to provide studentsbetween macro external factors and Caribbean social structure, with a basic understanding of the major theories of crime andexamining the relationship between the phenomenon of deviance and their relevance in term’s of research and policyCaribbean migration, Caribbean societal development from development. It also seeks to provide students with a workingpost- emancipation to pre-independent times, and the issues of understanding of selected issues on crime with a local andglobalization, liberalization, religion, class and ethnicity on the Caribbean focus. Some of these selected issues include: theoriesCaribbean social structure in contemporary times. of crime, Caribbean Criminology, the Muslimeen Insurrection, juvenile delinquency, white-collar crimes, crime statistics, fear of crime, community policing, victimization, gender and crime, and crime research and policy. 95
  • 96. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESLevel: III Level: IIISemester: II Semester: ICourse Code: SY39B (SOCI3036) Course Code: TR31A (TOUR 3003)Course Title: POLICE AND SOCIETY Course Title: INTEGRATED SERVICE MANAGEMENTNumber of Credits: 3 Number of Credits: 3Prerequisites: SY13E OR SY13F AND SY20E OR SY20F Prerequisites: HTM 233* AND HTM 259*Department Responsible: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES Department Responsible: Management StudiesCourse Description: In Police & Society we examine and critique Course Description: This course will examine the many facetstwo of the essential institutions in society intended to treat or of receptive and customer services within the context of thedeal with crime: law enforcement and corrections. We will also Hospitality and Tourism industry. Students will be given theas part of the content of the course develop complimentary framework in which to develop skills, knowledge and attituderesearch knowledge on deportees. necessary for the implementation as well as the development of policies, procedures, service systems and strategies that willLEVEL: III ensure quality service, customer satisfaction and the creation ofSEMESTER: II a service-oriented environment in the organization.COURSE CODE: SOCI 3038 *T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) courseCOURSE TITLE: GENDER, ETHNICITY AND CLASS INTHE ANGLOPHONE CARIBBEAN Level: IIINUMBER OF CREDITS: 3 Semester: IPREREQUISITES: Any of the following: SY13E (SOCI Course Code: TR31B (TOUR 3004)1002) AND SY13F (sOCI 1000); HIST2003; HIST2004; HIST Course Title: TOURISM DESTINATION MARKETING2005; HIST 3001; HIST 3002; HIST 3003; HIST 3005; HIST Number of Credits: 33601; SOCI 3029; GEND 2203 Prerequisites: BC 222* AND HTM 233*DEPARTMENT RESPONSBILE: CENTRE FOR GENDER AND Department Responsible: Management StudiesDEVELOPMENT STUDIES / BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES Course Description: This course examines the variables involvedCourse Description: This course seeks to raise the level or in the marketing of tourist destinations. Special attention isdiscourse on ‘race’ and ethnic relations on our societies and given to planning and operations of events and attractions inestablish the centrality of gender to issues of ‘race’, ethnicity Trinidad and Tobago.and culture. At the end of this course the student should be *T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) coursemore familiar with the historical background to contemporaryrelations; have a better understanding of the ways in which Level: IIIwomen and men are differently located within the discourse on Semester: Irace and class in the region; and an appreciation of the new ways Course Code: TR31C (TOUR 3005)in which scholars have sought to understand and conceptualise Course Title: TOURISM PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENTthese complex interactions. It is hoped that this course will Number of Credits: 3contribute to a more informed approach to inter-ethnic and Prerequisites: HTM 258* AND HTM 259*gender relations in the region. This course is intended for senior Department Responsible: Management Studiesundergraduates and should be open to students from a range Course Description: This course aims to provide anof faculties. Some knowledge of sociology would be an asset. understanding of the process of tourism development planning and the creation of national Tourism Master Plans. Topics coveredLevel: II will include concepts, objectives and methods of planning inSemester: Ii the context of the physical environment; assessment of tourismCourse Code: TR21C (TOUR 2005) potential; survey and analysis of tourism resources conservationCourse Title: TRANSPORTATION AND TRAVEL policies; pollution control; infrastructure development. TourismNumber of Credits: 3 development plans of Caribbean destinations will be reviewedPrerequisites: HTM 163* AND HTM 150* and evaluated.Department Responsible: Management Studies *T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) courseCourse Description: This course offers an analysis of thedevelopment, role and operation of transportation services in the LEVEL: IIItourism industry. Topics covered include: the interrelationship of SEMESTER: IItransportation and tourism; the significance of different modes COURSE CODE: TR32B (TOUR 3008)of transportation for tourism; the structure of the international COURSE TITLE: TOURISM IMPACT ANALYSISair transportation industry; scheduled and charter services in NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3the air transportation; cruise, ferries and yachting transportation; PRE-REQUISITES: Nonethe economics of operation of passenger transport; economic DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE: MANAGEMENT STUDIESand legal regulation of transportation. Future trends in travel Course Description: This course evaluates the various tools/and transportation will also be discussed. mechanisms for assessing the various impacts of tourism;*T&T Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) course assesses the value of tourism management strategies on destinations, with particular reference to ‘ethical and fairly traded tourism’; and examines the applicability of sustainable tourism within the context of sustainable development.96
  • 97. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESAPPENDICES Late Registration 11. In cases where results are declared after May 31, studentsI. Special Regulations Governing the may be permitted to register up to the end of the second week of the “Summer” School session. “Summer” School Examinations1. “Summer” School Students shall be required to comply 12. Examinations for courses taught in the “Summer” School with the General Regulations for students. shall be conducted in accordance with the University Examination Regulations.Period of Study2. Classes in the“Summer”School shall normally be conducted * For categories (i) and (ii) of Clause 7 - students must submit a during the period June 1 and July 31. copy of their most recent grade slip. For category (iii) of Clause 7 - students must submit their original CXC and/or GCE O- and3. The minimum contact period in the “Summer” School shall A-Level Certificates. be no less than thirteen (13) hours per credit. 13. Question papers for “Summer” School examinations shouldEligibility for Admission to the “Summer” School ideally be submitted to the Registry at the same time as4. The following categories are eligible for admission to the the Semester I or Semester II question papers, and in any “Summer” School:- case shall be submitted no later than the beginning of the i. Registered students of the University who have not yet “Summer” School. completed the requirements of the degree, diploma or certificate programme for which they are registered. 14. “Summer” School students shall write the University ii. Students of the University who have been granted (a) examinations appropriate to the course(s) for which they leave of absence for Semester I and/or Semester II or part are registered. thereof preceding the “Summer” School or (b) deferral of entry. Declaration of Results iii. Other persons not students of the University who are 15. Results for the “Summer” School examinations shall be eligible to matriculate at either the normal or lower dealt with in accordance with the University Examinations level. Regulations and shall be declared no later than August 31.5. “Summer” School students who have not been offered 16. Students who register for a course and do not write the a place at the University have no automatic right of examination shall be deemed by the Board of Examiners to acceptance into any Faculty of the University (Ref. 7 (iii) have failed the course unless an application for withdrawal above). has been received by the Registry within the time specified below.Applications6. Applications for admission to a “Summer” School must be Change of Registration made on the appropriate form. and shall be submitted to 17. “Summer” School students may apply for a change of the Registry no later than Monday following the last day of registration by submitting a change of registration (“add/ Semester II together with appropriate documentation.* drop”) form. to the Registry no later than the end of the second week of the “Summer” School session.7. Offers of entry to the “Summer” School shall be made by the Registry no later than May 26 or one (1) week prior to Application for Withdrawal the start of the “Summer” School. 18. “Summer” School students may apply to withdraw from a course or courses by writing to the Campus Registrar.Registration8. “Summer” School Students shall be required to pay 19. Applications for withdrawal from a course must reach the the appropriate fees and to complete and submit their Campus Registrar no later than the end of the 2nd week of registration form’s to the Registry no later than May 31. the “Summer” School session.9. “Summer” School Students shall not normally be permitted Credit/Exemption to register for more than three (3) one-semester courses 20. Registered students of the University including those on (usually nine (9) credits) in any given “Summer” School. approved leave of absence shall be given credit for courses successfully completed at the “Summer” School (Ref. 7 (i)10. Registration for a course offered in the “Summer” School & (ii) above). Unless they register expressly not for credit implies registration for the examination of that course. students may not subsequently have such credit altered. 97
  • 98. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES21. Persons in categories (iii) of Regulation 7 above who are 3. Class of Degree accepted into the University may be granted credit/ This will be determined in accordance with existing UWI exemption for courses successfully completed in the regulations. “Summer” School provided that five (5) years have not elapsed since the completion of the relevant course(s). 4. Programme Summary This four-year programme consists of a common core ofNote: Participation of students in the “Summer” session shall Hospitality and Tourism courses along with Business and be optional. Management courses. Additionally, students choose from two specialist areas: Hospitality Management (viz. CulinaryPolicy for Exemption and Credits for “Summer” School Management, Food and Beverage Management, HotelProgrammes Operations Management) and Tourism Management.22. Students who hold certificates (e.g. CPA, CPSHRM. and CLGS) entering any Certificate programme offered by the The majority of vocational courses, particularly in Hospitality Faculty of Social Sciences, “Summer” Programme may be Management, are undertaken during the first two years of granted no more than nine (9) credits in cases where they study at the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism are eligible for exemptions and credits. Institute. Students will receive practical exposure to kitchen, restaurant and other hotel operational areas at23. Students requesting exemptions and credits for more than the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute. nine (9) credits may be granted exemptions only and be Students will also be given the opportunity to gain hands- required to replace the others with any Level I or Certificate on experience, and a realistic appreciation of the working courses for credits. environment of the industry through an internship scheme for which TTHTI has primary responsibility.24. Students who hold B.Sc. Degrees, entering the Diploma in Security Administration (DSA) offered by the Faculty of 5. Admissions Criteria Social Sciences,“Summer” Programme may also be granted In order to be admitted to the second phase of B.Sc. no more than nine (9) credits. Programme at UWI, St. Augustine, students must complete the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute25. Students requesting exemptions and credits for more than (TTHTI) Associate Degree programme in Hospitality and nine (9) credits may be granted exemptions only and be Tourism Management, with a minimum Grade Point required to replace the others with any Level I or any Level Average (GPA) of 3.0, based on the TTHTI Grade Point II or III courses once they have the prerequisites. System. Graduates of other Associate Degree programmes Key: CPA: Certificate in Public Administration equivalent to TTHTI’s revised programme will be considered CPSHRM.: Certificate in Public Sector Human for admission. Resource Management Graduates of TTHTI up to the Year 2001 who are admitted CLGS: Certificate in Local Government will be required to successfully complete EC141 and EC160 at The University of the West Indies. TTHTI Graduates of 2002 and beyond will not be required to do theseIi. Special Regulations for Degrees in subjects. Hospitality and Tourism Management 6. Foundation Courses1. Introduction Completion of the degree requires at least 6 credits The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine in of foundation courses. (Refer to the section – Course collaboration with the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality Requirements for Bachelor of Science Programmes: and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) offers a Degree Programme Specializations, Majors and Minors) in Hospitality and Tourism Management, which is delivered through the Department of Management Studies at the St. 7. “Summer” Internships Augustine campus, and the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality The programme includes three (3) internships, each of eight and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) at Chaguaramas. (8) weeks duration. Two (2) internships are administered by TTHTI for the first two (2) years of the programme. The third2. Programme Structure internship commences at the end of the Year III at UWI. Years I and II are administered at TTHTI and Years III and IV These internships are conducted at approved Hospitality are administered at UWI, St. Augustine. In order to qualify and Tourism organizations. The primary responsibility for for the award of the degree a student must: the internships rests with TTHTI, given its established links (i) at least 75 from Year I and Year II at TTHTI, and with the industry. (ii) at least 60 from Year III and Year IV at UWI (including foundation course requirement) (b) have satisfied the compulsory requirement for either the Hospitality or Tourism major.98
  • 99. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESIii. Special Regulations for the Diploma in Target Audience Public Sector Management (All Semesters) 4. (i) Former graduates of The University of the West Indies whose first degree did not include the Social Sciences1. The Diploma in Public Sector Management will be or who want to upgrade their skills. awarded to persons who, having completed the course of (ii) Persons outside the Caribbean whose ambition it is to study prescribed by these regulations, have satisfied the acquire some specialist knowledge of the Caribbean. examiners in the examination for the Diploma. Qualifications for AdmissionQualifications for Admission 5. A first degree in any field or equivalent qualification.2. To be admitted to the prescribed course of study for the Diploma, candidates must:- Award of Diploma i. be graduates of an approved university; 6. The Diploma will normally be conferred only after successfulOR ii. hold an approved technical or professional completion of all required courses. qualification awarded by an approved body;OR iii. have in the opinion of the University, practical experience V. Special Regulations for the Diploma or other qualifications of special relevance to the course. In Security Administration Persons seeking admission, who do not satisfy the (“Summer” Programme Only) requirements at (i) or (ii) will normally be required to have had about five (5) years experience in executive or 1. The Diploma in Security Administration (DSA) is an intensive administrative work. programme designed to better prepare public and private sector security officials and executives to administer their3. A candidate registered for the Diploma in Public Sector respective duties. Management who reaches the prescribed standard for the Diploma in Public Sector Management in each of ten Duration (10) papers; and fails to reach a standard, in the last two (2) 2. Approximately one (1) academic year (over two (2) papers, high enough for referral, may be recommended by “Summer”s) for full-time study or approximately two (2) examiners for a Certificate in Public Administration. academic years (over three (3) “Summer”s) for part-time study.4. A student who has been referred in two (2) papers in the Diploma in Public Sector Management and who on re- Target Audience examination fails to reach the prescribed standard may be 3. The DSA is aimed at first division officers, middle and senior recommended by the examiners for a Certificate in Public level ranks in the Police Service, Defence force, Prisons and Administration. Fire Services and also private security firm’s.Award of Diploma Qualifications for Admission5. The Diploma will normally be conferred only after successful 4. Candidates will be accepted into the DSA based on either completion of all required courses. of the following: • Holder of an approved university degree.IV. SPECIAL Regulations for the Diploma in • Holder of approved technical or professional Caribbean Studies (“Summer” Programme Only) qualifications. • Practical experience or other qualifications bearing1. This programme is structured on the assumption that special relevance to the course. to understand the Caribbean an integrated approach • Graduate of the Security Management programme is necessary and must accordingly involve the various offered by the UWI School of Continuing Studies. disciplines in the Arts and Social Sciences. The Diploma therefore will consist of a broad range of subjects taken Award of Diploma over an intensive four-month period. 5. The Diploma shall be awarded to persons who have completed thirty (30) credits (equivalent to ten (10)2. Lectures/seminars and tutorials will normally be conducted semester courses) and have satisfied the examiners of the in English. Diploma.Duration3. Two (2) “Summer” semesters 99
  • 100. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESVI. Special Regulations for the Certificate in Qualifications for Admission Public Administration (All Semesters) 4. To be admitted to the CLGS, candidates must satisfy lower level matriculation, that is, five (5) O-Levels inclusive of1. The Certificate in Public Administration shall be awarded English Language. In addition, they must have at least five to persons who, having completed the course of study (5) years of practical work experience. Special consideration prescribed by these Regulations, have satisfied the will be given to unqualified mature persons who have examiners in the examination for the Certificate. substantive working experience.Qualifications for Admission 5. Cognizant of the specific focus of this programme,2. To be admitted to the prescribed course of study for the preferential consideration will be given to Councillors Certificate in Public Administration, candidates must:- and Aldermen. For such candidates, the five-year working i. be matriculated students of the University; and experience criterion will be waived for those who satisfy ii. have in the opinion of the University, practical experience the lower level matriculation. For unqualified Councillors or other qualifications of special relevance to the course. and Aldermen, they should have served at least one year in Persons seeking admission will normally be required office. to have had about five years’ experience of civil service work or other relevant experience. Award of Certificate 6. The CLGS will be awarded to candidates who have3. Candidates seeking admission, who do not satisfy the completed thirty (30) credits (equivalent to ten (10) requirements at 2(i) but who are deemed capable of doing semester courses) and have satisfied the examiners for the the standard of work required for the Certificate may be Certificate. permitted to enter the Certificate course, at the discretion of the Faculty. VIII. Special Regulations for the Certificate inAward of the Certificate Management InfoRmation Systems4. In order to be awarded the Certificate in Public (“Summer” Programme Only) Administration, a student must complete thirty (30) credits (equivalent to ten (10) semester courses). 1. The Certificate in Management Information Systems (CMIS) is part of the Faculty’s drive to better serve the MIS environment. Upon completion, participants should beVII. Special Regulations for the Certificate in able to function competently and efficiently in an MIS or Local Government Studies any other environment in which the computer plays a key (“Summer” Programme Only) role. Duration1. The Certificate in Local Government Studies (CLGS) allows 2. Approximately two (2) academic years (over three (3) students to develop a basic understanding of how local “Summers”) government systems operate in the Commonwealth Caribbean. The course of study analyzes different form’s Target Audience of local government as they exist in the region as well as 3. This course is intended principally for persons currently give appreciation of local government systems in different employed in computer related occupations but who lack parts of the world. Other issues to be considered will be formal training in the area. constraints within the local government systems along with various local, regional and international organizations Qualifications for Admission that play a part in the advancement of Caribbean local 4. (i) Five (5) Ordinary Level/CXC General passes, including government. Mathematics and English Language, or some equivalent qualificationDuration (ii) At least two (2) years experience in a computer2. Approximately two (2) academic years (over three (3) environment “Summer” Semesters). Award of CertificateTarget Audience 5. The CMIS shall be awarded to persons who have completed3. The CLGS is specifically targeted to persons working in thirty (30) credits (equivalent to ten (10) semester courses) local government organizations and/or persons who wish and have satisfied the examiners for the Certificate. to better understand the operations of such systems.100
  • 101. U N D E R G R A D U A T E R E G U L A T I O N S & S Y L L A B U S E S 2 0 0 8 – 2 0 0 9 THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCESIX. Special Regulations for the Certificate in Public Sector Human Resource Management (“Summer” Programme Only)1. The intention of this programme is to sensitize lower level managers within the public sector, and even the private sector to some of the changes taking place within the public sector and hopefully, to equip them to face these changes.2. In recent years, the public sectors in the Caribbean, as elsewhere, have been involved in attempts at administrative reform.3. A critical focus of this “new management philosophy” is human resource management. Indeed the new thrust is increasingly a change from what was traditionally regarded as personnel administration to what is now perceived as a question of the proper management of human resources. This has necessitated a fundamental restructuring of the various units involved in human resource management within the local and regional public services.Duration4. Approximately two (2) academic years (over three (3) “Summers”)Target Audience5. The programme will prove useful particularly to public servants at the levels of Administrative Officer IIs, Cadets, Administrative Assistants and Clerk IVs as well as Supervisors of equivalent status.6. The programme is focused on five core areas, a. Organizational Theory and Behaviour b. Industrial Relations c. Human Resource Management d. Compensation Management e. Human Resource DevelopmentQualifications for Admission7. To be admitted to the Certificate in Public Sector Human Resource Management (CHRM), candidates must (i) satisfy lower level matriculation, that is, five (5) O-Levels inclusive of English Language and (ii) possess practical experience or other qualifications of special relevance to the course.8. Persons seeking admission will normally be required to have had about five (5) years’ experience of civil service work or other relevant experience.9. The Faculty may use its discretion in accepting candidates who do not satisfy the requirements mentioned above but who are deemed capable of doing the standard of work required for the Certificate.Award of Certificate10. The CHRM shall be awarded to persons who have completed thirty (30) credits (equivalent to ten (10) semester courses) and have satisfied the examiners for the Certificate. 101
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