Session 1 How does my child learn Japanese/Spanish/English in immersion classroom?

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presented during Immersion Parent Partnership meeting. The presentation explains how immersion students learn their L2 in foreign/dual language immersion classrooms.

presented during Immersion Parent Partnership meeting. The presentation explains how immersion students learn their L2 in foreign/dual language immersion classrooms.

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  • This series of parent meetings are titled “Demystifying Immersion Education.” Some of you may be wondering how these children, being as young as 5 years old, start developing a second language while we adults struggle to remember only few words in another language? What is really happening in these so-called Spanish/Japanese “immersion” classrooms? Well, today, it is my intention to show you that how your child learns a second language in one of these classrooms is not mystery, but it is the result of a very effective bilingual teaching method called language immersion.
  • This series of parent meetings are titled “Demystifying Immersion Education.” Some of you may be wondering how these children, being as young as 5 years old, start developing a second language while we adults struggle to remember only few words in another language? What is really happening in these so-called Spanish/Japanese “immersion” classrooms? Well, today, it is my intention to show you that how your child learns a second language in one of these classrooms is not mystery, but it is the result of a very effective bilingual teaching method called language immersion.
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  • In a immersion classroom, a student is being immersed in a very language-rich context. However, this does not translate into becoming proficient in that language, as much as being in the water makes anyone to become a good swimmer. The person in the water needs to move her hands and feet and kick water trying to move forward. When a student in an immersion classroom tries to pay attention to her surroundings and to “make sense” of what is going on by picking up second language input, she is benefiting from being immersed in the language.
  • There is another side to this. It is true that students need to “pick up” the language input, they also need “a handle” on the language. This handle is called comprehensibility. Immersion teachers know how to make their second language instructions comprehensible in various ways.

Transcript

  • 1. Immersion Parent Partner Meeting Session 1 September 28, 2011 How does my child learn Japanese/Spanish/English in the immersion classroom?
  • 2. A little about myself
    • Mike Yamakawa
      • Born in Tokyo, Japan
      • Came to the U.S. in 11 th grade
      • Masters in Linguistics with TESOL
      • Taught in immersion classroom for 15 years from 2 nd to 6 th grade
      • Started working at El Marino in 2000
      • FLAP curriculum development support since last year
    22
  • 3.
    • What motivated you to choose language immersion education for your child?
    Pair Share!
  • 4. Bilingual Education “A gift to your child”
  • 5. Today’s Overview
    • Language Immersion: What is it?
    • Immersion Lesson Demonstration
    • How immersion students develop their second language
    • Parent Partner Groups
  • 6. Language Immersion: What is it?
    • Students receive academic instruction (e.g., math, science, social studies) in a second language.
    • English-speaking students develop a second language (Spanish/Japanese) over time. This does not delay future English development.
    • Native-speakers of the minority language (Spanish/Japanese) maintain their first language and also develop English proficiency.
    • 90 :10 model; 70 :30 model; 50 :50 model (target language instruction ratio)
    • One-way immersion vs. two-way immersion (30-50% native Japanese/Spanish speaker population in classroom)
  • 7. How does my child learn a second language in the immersion classroom?
  • 8. How does my child learn a second language in the immersion classroom?
    • By “figuring out” (comprehension)
    • By “speaking out” (production)
    • By using language “as a tool”
    • By interacting with peers
    • By transferring concepts across languages
  • 9. Immersion Lesson Demonstration “ lemma” “ tajui” “ pekichi” “ davan”
  • 10.
    • By “figuring out” (comprehension)
      • Students are being “immersed” in a language-rich context
      • However, just being “in the water” does not make a good swimmer.
    How immersion students develop their second language
  • 11.
    • Students need a handle to “pick up” the language.
    • Handle = Comprehensibility
    • Immersion teachers make Spanish/ Japanese/English instruction comprehensible in many ways!
    How immersion students develop their second language…
  • 12.
    • “ How do immersion teachers make their
    • Spanish/Japanese/English instruction
    • comprehensible?”
    • Visually (pictures, posters, graphic organizers)
    • Audibly (choral responses, speech frames, teacher-talk)
    • Physically (gesture, body movement, facial expressions)
    • Through academic subjects (science, social studies, theme study)
    • Communicatively (teacher-guided activity, group/pair work)
    Making Second Language Comprehensible
  • 13. Immersion Lesson Demonstration (TPR) tamago imo-mushi sanagi chou
  • 14. What’s Missing?
  • 15. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By speaking out (production)
      • Research shows that there is a gap between “understanding” a language and “producing” it.
      • Immersion students process language mainly by meaning and not structure.
      • Non-punitive, facilitated interactions in Spanish, Japanese, and English are effective in developing accuracy.
      • Oral language is a base for writing.
      • Students are encouraged to speak a lot in the immersion classroom!
  • 16. Immersion Lesson Demonstration 1 ( ichi ), tamago 2 ( ni ), imo-mushi 3 ( san ), sanagi 4 ( yon ), chou 1 2 3 4
  • 17. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By using language as “a tool”
      • Spanish/Japanese/English is not the immediate object of study (except for reading/writing skills)
      • A tool to access and meaningfully explore the academic content
      • A tool to communicate and collaborate with classmates
      • Similar process for acquiring the first language (How many of us needed grammar lessons when we learned to speak our first language?)
  • 18. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By interacting with peers
      • “ Peer language”: a true advantage in Two-way or dual language immersion model
      • Facilitates “informal” language
      • Prevents “grammatically awkward” speech patterns from becoming a norm
      • Develops a classroom environment in which English-speaking students speak Japanese/Spanish to non-English speakers (and non-English speakers speak English)
  • 19. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By transferring concepts across languages
      • “ Two-Balloon Theory”
      • -Learning in child’s first language limits his/her exposure to the second language and inhibits its acquisition.
      • -Argument against bilingual education
    What I learned in first language What I learned in second language
  • 20. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By transferring concepts across languages
      • “ One-Balloon Theory”
      • -The knowledge of content and some language skills learned in one language can be transferred to a second language.
      • -Bilingual education benefits non-English speakers and enriches English speakers .
    What I learned in first language What I learned in second language
  • 21. How immersion students develop their second language
    • By transferring concepts across languages
      • Immersion teachers intertwine the target language (Spanish/Japanese) and English lessons to facilitate transfer of content and skills across languages.
      • Strong reason for English learners to extend their education in the minority language
      • Parents can support their children in the home language.
  • 22. Parent Partner Group “Find Someone Who”
    • We would like to provide the opportunity to get to know other immersion parents in the room!
    • As you participate in the activity, “Find Someone Who,” please introduce yourself and the grade level of your child . THANK YOU!
  • 23. Activity: “Find Someone Who” 10/15/11 2-Way CABE Summerl Conference 2009 … M.Y. . A.H. . R.S. Find Someone Who… Name ______________   ___ can share why he/she wants his/her child to become bilingual. ___ can share one thing he/she found interesting from today’s session. ___ discovered an effective way to encourage the child to do well in the immersion classroom .
  • 24. Thank you for participating!
    • We will look forward to seeing you at the next Immersion Parent Partner session!
    • Session 2: “Myth and Reality about Immersion Education”
    • Wednesday, October 19
    • Realistic picture of bilingual education
    • What immersion parents should/should not expect from immersion education