Stories and Experience (TEDx Newcastle)

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Your product probably spends most of its existence in the memory of your customers. In Stories and Experience I run through what we can do to help ensure that the experiences we design become stories after the fact.

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  • Great presentation on presentations - thanks for several guideline gems.
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  • Bruce Willis and Haley Joel Osmond
    Starts with shooting of Bruce, child psychologist
    Relationship between psychologist, boy and ghosts
    But he’s dead!
  • Track 2 Atlantic City
    Sparse but concept
    It’s the Boss doing folk!
  • Beautifully made
    Incredibly intuitive
    The swooshing physics never gets boring
  • What all 3 of these have in common is the story about the story.
    Simple but memorable
  • Sixth sense is too long
    Nebraska’s pretty bleak
    iPhone battery
  • Because they’re so easy to explain all 3 have evangelical fans.
    We tell what we remember but we also remember what we tell - feedback loop!
  • I’ve picked a few aspects of good stories that can be wrapped around the kind of experience that Andy’s going to talk about to help make you memorable.
  • Would you hire this person...
  • ...or this one?
  • This is called primacy error and it’s why your Mum told you to make a good first impression.
    Beliefs are formed by first impressions; the later evidence is interpreted in the light of these beliefs.
    Incredibly powerful.
  • 2000, 2002, 2004 US Senatorial Elections
    pairs of photographs for one second
    Choose which of the two looked most competent
    Predicted the actual election results about 70% of the time.
    Degree of disagreement predicted the margin too!

    Anecdotal story from a financial advisor friend who said that the most successful fund managers are tall. A little research reveals that men get paid $4700/year/inch height over average.
  • Attractive defendants were twice as likely to avoid jail as unattractive defendants.
    Also paid half the damages when found guilty - $5,623 vs $10,051
  • In the parlance of our times
  • If you’re after high perceived value then look and feel good!
  • There’s a subtlety to this. Need to look appropriate. Here’s why...
  • New York University
    “Scrambled word” tests - 5 words to make a sentence
    e.g. Florida, old, worried, sentimental, wrinkle
    Primed to be nice too
    Also found that people with warm hands rate others more positively - primed with “warm”
    Prime your users to expect what you have to offer...
  • confirmed expectations -> enjoyment
    Less disconnect and less dischord.
  • Dan Hill article
  • Neither usable nor attractive. Almost impossible to make a really nice page.
    But like the photocopied flyers for DIY gigs. Compare to the sterile Facebook Music pages.
    I think there’s an argument for bad design!

    Survival of the most fit or the fit enough NOT the fittest.
  • ...but you also need to know who they are.
    Mad Monk
    Debauched religious charlatan
    Nun raper
    Helped facilitate the fall of the Romanovs
    Subjects who were told he shared their birthday were prepared to overlook his wrongdoings

    People called Florence who live in Florida
    Abnormal number of dentists called Dennis and lawyers called Lawrence
  • Viral, invite-only. Looks unfinished and alpha.
    Aimed at the technorati and suggested both exclusivity and bleeding edge
    Perfect fit for people who consider themselves to be early adopters.
    May be unintentional but could be a very clever design strategy...
  • Every conceivable sliver of society.
    Elements of similarity too? Like Rasputin’s birthday?
  • 10min
    Given all the positivity in the world people still just want to get stuff done.
    How you do what you do probably isn’t their story once the experience is done.
    Unobtrusive interface.
  • A study by Willen Wagenaar showed that even when told they were handling dangerous objects only 23% actually read the label - mostly claiming habit - despite 97% claiming to read labels.
  • Work less explicitly
  • Graphical wayfinding cues
  • Social cues at decision point
  • My favourite comes form Boxes and Arrows
    Each train station in a large city has a unique audio melody associated with it.
    Commuters learn their chime and the one for the station before theirs
    This is the kind of interface aid that becomes invisible
  • Shultz and Webb
    No one tells stories about how they used the telephone but they feature in plenty of stories.
  • If you want this then the tool should disappear. Users should be focused on their goal, not so much how they get there.
  • Made a good first impression, the right first impression, a rip roaring middle. What can you add to make the experience memorable?
    iPhone physics, he’s already dead
    Think of urban legends - they tend to have a vivid detail that sticks in your mind.
  • Hotel industry “delighters”
  • Sinatra shutdown
  • BBC iPlayer goes up to 11 - Spinal Tap reference
  • Beautiful, clever
    When a Star Wars is added says 'I am your father’
    When Rock Band is added sings a portion of Run to the Hills by Iron Maiden
    Best User Experience award from Apple
  • You’ve made the right first impression, you’ve flowed, you’ve been delightful.
  • You’re hoping people will talk about you. How about helping them out?
    If you intend to be remarked upon should you design for it?
    Not just are you going to remark on it but what are you going to say?

    One of the most fundamental mechanisms we have for transmitting information
  • Complex. People might relay the proposition in raw form but a little wrapping might help...
    Story style to aid memory.
    Pre-constructed anecdote to help spread the word.
  • Back to where we started.
  • To cut a long story short.
    ...here’s the experience puzzle you need to solve.
  • Stories and Experience (TEDx Newcastle)

    1. 1. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse donotremove.co.uk
    2. 2. imdb.com/title/tt0167404/
    3. 3. “Nebraska” by Bruce Springsteen
    4. 4. apple.com
    5. 5. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 What matters is the memory of the events. Don Norman Interactions: 2009 jnd.org/dn.mss/memory_is_more_important_than_actuality.html
    6. 6. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 The negative emotions associated with the bad parts fade away more quickly than the cognitive evaluation. Don Norman Interactions: 2009 jnd.org/dn.mss/memory_is_more_important_than_actuality.html
    7. 7. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 The content of story memories depends on whether and how they are told to others. Schank & Abelson Knowledge & Memory: The Real Story books.google.com/books?id=mR2B-FdDzDoC
    8. 8. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 So...
    9. 9. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Envious, stubborn, critical, impulsive, industrious & intelligent. Soloman Asch, 1946
    10. 10. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Intelligent, industrious, impulsive, critical, stubborn, envious. Soloman Asch, 1946
    11. 11. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Start strong...
    12. 12. flickr.com/photos/chrismar/3814037373
    13. 13. flickr.com/photos/willemvanbergen/3832290633
    14. 14. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 The economics profession went astray because economists, as a group, mistook beauty, clad in impressive- looking mathematics, for truth. Paul Krugman 2008 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics nytimes.com/2009/09/06/magazine/06Economic-t.html
    15. 15. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Process selection will affect the quality of the finished part and therefore the perceived value. Rob Thompson Manufacturing Process for Design Professionals Thames & Hudson, 2007
    16. 16. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Make the right first impression...
    17. 17. flickr.com/photos/12392252@N03/3363334224
    18. 18. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 The more Themail confirmed their expectations—that is, their mental model of what their relationships were like—the more they enjoyed using the tool. Viégas, Golder & Donath IBM Research, HP Laboratories, MIT Media Lab alumni.media.mit.edu/~fviegas/projects/themail/study/index.htm
    19. 19. monocle.com
    20. 20. myspace.com/bellesauvage
    21. 21. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigori_Rasputin
    22. 22. gmail.com
    23. 23. underconsideration.com/speakup/archives/004262.html
    24. 24. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Account executive: So, who'd you vote for? Creative director: Obama, he's got cool logos. overheardinnewyork.com/archives/015249.html
    25. 25. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Disappear...
    26. 26. flickr.com/photos/maynard/2590224447
    27. 27. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 [Users] look elsewhere, to the visual clues and a well-designed flow, to ensure they have the delightful experience we’re hoping for. Jared Spool Brainsparks icanhaz.com/greatexpectations
    28. 28. bbc.co.uk
    29. 29. flickr.com
    30. 30. flickr.com/photos/blueandwhitehoops/2294861912
    31. 31. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Speak TO the person at the other end of the line—not TO the telephone—then you’re more apt to be pleasant and understanding. berglondon.com/blog/2006/01/16/ready-at-hand-and-present-at-hand
    32. 32. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 [Testimonials] should be about how great these users are as a result of using the product. Kathy Sierra Web2.0 Expo Berlin, 2007 climbtothestars.org/archives/2007/11/05/kathy-sierra-creating-passionate-users-web20expo-berlin/
    33. 33. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Have a twist...
    34. 34. Sofitel, Sharm el-Sheikh
    35. 35. sinatrarb.com
    36. 36. dopplr.com
    37. 37. bbc.co.uk/iplayer
    38. 38. delicious-monster.com
    39. 39. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 And be remarkable...
    40. 40. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Remarkable doesn’t mean remarkable to you. It means remarkable to me. Am I going to make a remark about it? Seth Godin The Guardian, 2007 guardian.co.uk/money/2007/jan/06/careers.work5#article_continue
    41. 41. trampolinesystems.com
    42. 42. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 What matters is the memory of the events. Don Norman Interactions: 2009 jnd.org/dn.mss/memory_is_more_important_than_actuality.html
    43. 43. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Make the right first impression then disappear yet still be remarkable.
    44. 44. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Thank you!
    45. 45. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Blink by Malcolm Gladwell Influence by Robert B. Cialdini Irrationality by Stuart Sutherland Mind Hacks by Stafford & Webb Nudge by Thaler & Sunstein Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely Quirkology by Richard Wiseman Sources of Power by Gary Klein Tricks of the Mind by Derren Brown Yes! by J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin, Robert B. Cialdini
    46. 46. Stories & Experience Mike Stenhouse TEDx Newcastle 2009 Mike Stenhouse donotremove.co.uk frankenstory.com whatiminto.com trampolinesystems.com contentwithstyle.co.uk

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