Occupational cancer what you need to know

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Annotated slides from a presentation given at the Safety and Health Expo in London 17 June 2014

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Occupational cancer what you need to know

  1. 1. Occupational cancer - what you need to know Mike Slater BOHS President 2014/15
  2. 2. Approximately 8,000 workers die every year in Great Britain from occupational cancer
  3. 3. 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 Other agents Working as painter Shift work Mineral oils Diesel exhaust emissions Silica Asbestos Occupational cancer deaths by cause in Great Britain, 2005
  4. 4. Controlling exposure to carcinogens at work
  5. 5. Recognise Evaluate Control Occupational Hygiene
  6. 6. Recognise Evaluate Control Occupational Hygiene
  7. 7. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE
  8. 8. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE This is the basis of the “hierarchy of control” - a list of common control measures in order of preference.
  9. 9. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE Let’s look at some examples of how it can be applied to controlling common occupational carcinogens
  10. 10. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE
  11. 11. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE We’ll start with how exposure can be prevented
  12. 12. Beta-napthylamine, a potent bladder carcinogen, has been banned
  13. 13. The use of asbestos has also been banned
  14. 14. The use of silica sand for blasting is not allowed. Alternatives must be used.
  15. 15. Diesel powered fork lift trucks can be replaced by LPG powered vehicles
  16. 16. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE When we can’t prevent exposure, we should try to find engineering approaches to control exposure
  17. 17. Source: http://www.hse.gov.uk/copd/casestudies/wetcut.htm Wet cutting of stone or concrete significantly reduces dust exposures
  18. 18. An example of process containment
  19. 19. Partial containment with local extraction
  20. 20. On tool extraction
  21. 21. Local extraction
  22. 22. www.aessolutions.co.uk Cleaning up using a vacuum rather than sweeping
  23. 23. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE
  24. 24. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE  Reduce exposure time  Increase distance  Working methods  Standard procedures
  25. 25. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE
  26. 26. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE
  27. 27. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE Respiratory protection really shouldn’t be used as a primary control for carcinogens
  28. 28. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE But it may be needed in some situations as a secondary control or where other approaches aren’t practicable
  29. 29. Good training and supervision is needed to make sure respiratory protection is effective
  30. 30. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE Supervision Maintenance Procedures Auditing Testing Health surveillance Monitoring Information Training
  31. 31. Prevention Engineering Work practices PPE Supervision Maintenance Procedures Auditing Testing Health surveillance Monitoring Information Training These management measures are needed to ensure controls work effectively
  32. 32. Lot’s of good guidance on control is available from the HSE
  33. 33. Occupational hygienists can help employers to locate the relevant information
  34. 34. Nanotechnology New substances can present new challenges
  35. 35. Occupational hygienists have the knowledge and skills to develop solutions
  36. 36. http://www.bohs.org/OHServices-directory/
  37. 37. Qualified Occupational hygienists can help to control problems like this!
  38. 38. president@bohs.org http://www.bohs.org Twitter: @bohsworld http://www.slideshare.net/mikeslater

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