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Feeling the heat for slideshare Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Feeling the Heat – Managing Risks from Heat Stress at Work Mike Slater (President Elect)
  • 2. Human beings create heat
  • 3. 100 Watts 200 Watts 800 Watts
  • 4. 100 Watts 200 Watts 800 Watts The more physically demanding our activity, the more heat we’re producing
  • 5. We have to lose heat to the environment – but not too much
  • 6. But we can gain heat from to the environment too
  • 7. Radiation Convection
  • 8. Evaporation Radiation Convection
  • 9. Heat stroke Heat exhaustion Heat syncope Heat cramps Prickly heat
  • 10. Heat stroke Heat exhaustion Heat syncope Heat cramps Prickly heat
  • 11. Source: WHO
  • 12. Heat stroke Heat exhaustion Heat syncope Heat cramps Prickly heat
  • 13. Evaporation Radiation Convection
  • 14. Air temperature Humidity Mean radiant temperature Air velocity These are the environmentl factors we have to consider when assessing the risk of heat stress
  • 15. Air temperature Humidity Clothing Mean radiant temperature Metabolic rate Air velocity
  • 16. Air temperature Clothing Mean radiant temperature Acclimatisation Humidity Metabolic rate Air velocity And there are other factors we need to consider
  • 17. Air Temperature Standard thermometer
  • 18. Humidity
  • 19. Radiant heat Globe thermometer
  • 20. Air Velocity
  • 21. Metabolic rate 1 Met = 58 Wm-2
  • 22. Clothing 1 Clo = Insulation value of 0,155 m2 oC/W
  • 23. Acclimatisation YES ? OR NO?
  • 24. Air movement Humidity Work rate Mean radiant temp. Air temp. Clothing Heat stress index Acclimn
  • 25. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 26. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 27. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 28. Screening methods Talking to people Observations Checklists
  • 29. This looks complicated, but we can probably identify the risk factors fairly easily
  • 30. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 31. WBGT Index Indoors WBGT = 0.7 tnwb + 0.3 tg Outdoors WBGT = 0.7 tnwb + 0.2 tg + 0.1 ta
  • 32. ACGIH TLVs for Heat Stress Allocation of work in work Light cycle Moderate Heavy 75% to 100% 31.0 28.0 - 50% to 75% 25% to 50% 0 to 25% 29.0 30.0 31.5 27.5 29.0 30.5 31.0 32.0 32.5 Workload V ery heavy 28.0 30.0
  • 33. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 34. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 35. Physiological assessment Temperature Heart rate
  • 36. Miner’s Core Temperature & Heart Rate Source: OHTA.
  • 37. The risks here are more complex – an expert evaluation is likely to be needed
  • 38. A Structured Approach to Heat Stress Risk Assessment Identify Hazards Assess Risk using screening methods WBGT Index Identify Controls Expert analysis PHS Index Expert analysis Physiological measures
  • 39. Hierarchy of Control Prevention Engineering Working Practices Personal Protection
  • 40. Hierarchy of Control Prevention Engineering Working Practices Personal Protection Let’s look at some examples of typical controls
  • 41. Insulation of hot surfaces to reduce radiant and convective heat www.lubisol.com
  • 42. Extracting hot air
  • 43. Blowing in cool air http://mikegigi.com
  • 44. Providing protective clothing
  • 45. Regular drinks of water
  • 46. Management Measures Screening & health surveillance Information, instruction, training Supervision Self regulation Provide water
  • 47. Hierarchy of Control Supervision Prevention Maintenance Auditing Engineering Working Practices Personal Protection Water Health surveillance Monitoring Information Training
  • 48. Further Information
  • 49. http://www.hse.gov.uk/temperature/thermal/index.htm
  • 50. http://www.bohs.org/resources/res.aspx/Resource/filename/840/TG12.pdf http://www.bohs.org/resources/res.aspx/Resource/filename/1473/04_TG12_Addendum_to_2nd_Edition.pdf
  • 51. President-elect@bohs.org www.bohs.org Twitter: @bohsworld www.slideshare.net/mikeslater