Education Massachusetts School Laws 1642, 1647 (Old Deluder Satan Law) - Beginning of Public Education Colonial America
Mercantilism – economic system , in which a nation attempts to gain wealth and establish a:  Favorable Balance of Trade – ...
<ul><li>Navigation Acts  (beginning 1651) – English laws </li></ul><ul><li>- attempted to control colonial trade </li></ul...
New England economy - shipping trade, rum, fishing, whaling, and: Timber  - influenced by environment & geography - Large ...
Shipping Trade Triangular Trade – trade among the areas around the Atlantic Bills of Exchange – beginnings of a colonial c...
Salutary Neglect  - English allowed the colonists, through the colonial assemblies, govern themselves as long as they rema...
Population Growth Immigration  - Scots-Irish  - German (Pennsylvania Dutch)  Very high birthrates Longer Life expectancy -...
Slavery Middle Passage  - transportation of slaves from West Africa to the Americas Slave Population Growth 1690 = 13,000 ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

5.1 Colonial America

381

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
381
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

5.1 Colonial America

  1. 1. Education Massachusetts School Laws 1642, 1647 (Old Deluder Satan Law) - Beginning of Public Education Colonial America
  2. 2. Mercantilism – economic system , in which a nation attempts to gain wealth and establish a: Favorable Balance of Trade – the nation selling more goods (exports) than they buy (imports) Role of colonies in Mercantilism - provide raw materials to the home country - buy manufactured goods from the home country The American colonies were supposed to be profitable for England Trade in the Colonies
  3. 3. <ul><li>Navigation Acts (beginning 1651) – English laws </li></ul><ul><li>- attempted to control colonial trade </li></ul><ul><li>- required certain goods to be sold in England (enumerated goods) </li></ul><ul><li>- required the use of English or colonial ships and crews </li></ul><ul><li>- poorly enforced and widely ignored </li></ul><ul><li>Board of Trade (1696) </li></ul><ul><li>- another inefficient effort to regulate colonial trade </li></ul><ul><li>Effect </li></ul><ul><li>- Colonial habit of ignoring British Laws </li></ul><ul><li>smuggling, avoiding import (duties) taxes became a way of life </li></ul><ul><li>- increased distrust between colonists and the English </li></ul>
  4. 4. New England economy - shipping trade, rum, fishing, whaling, and: Timber - influenced by environment & geography - Large nearby wilderness - Fall Line: a drop in elevation = waterfalls = sawmills - logging , barrel-making & ship building being a large part of the economy
  5. 5. Shipping Trade Triangular Trade – trade among the areas around the Atlantic Bills of Exchange – beginnings of a colonial currency paper representing hard currency
  6. 6. Salutary Neglect - English allowed the colonists, through the colonial assemblies, govern themselves as long as they remained loyal politically and profitable economically. Colonial Governments Royal Governors – were paid by the colonial assemblies Colonial Assemblies – governed the colonies from the 1690’s until the 1760’s with little real interference from the British
  7. 7. Population Growth Immigration - Scots-Irish - German (Pennsylvania Dutch) Very high birthrates Longer Life expectancy - Healthier Diet Medical advances - Smallpox vaccination - Cotton Mather
  8. 8. Slavery Middle Passage - transportation of slaves from West Africa to the Americas Slave Population Growth 1690 = 13,000 , 1750 = 200,000 Stono Rebellion (1739) - South Carolina slave rebellion led to stricter laws New York Slave ‘Conspiracy’ of 1741 - exaggerated charges of conspiracy lead to the deaths of several black slaves
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×