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Comparing To The Best

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  • "Education is not a sphere apart, but is subject to social and cultural osmosis.  Many of the more specialized themes in educational debates such as the nature of intellectual culture, the forms of moral and mental development in children, or the art and science of teaching, are deeply colored by the consciousness that education and national survival are intertwined.  In this respect, is there not a convergence between the styles of educational planning and decision making in the developed and developing countries of the world?  The latter having long been familiar with the theme of education for national development - or survival.  Human "capital" is an asset of concerns to all countries." ~ Curriculum Reform: An Overview of Trends.  1990 Malcolm Skilbeck, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation
  • Asian societies rely on social capitalsThe United States relies more on Human Capitals
  • Impact of Confucianism and its influence on Japanese education.
  • Consistent through the research are references to the value that the Japanese culture puts on education.  The parents value it, the community values its, the nation values it.  QUOTE.  We don’t suggest that American culture could or should change to an attitude towards Saturday school and night tutoring, as American culture values the extracurricular activities that develop the whole body and address other interests.  But if we only look at how such attitudes affect the instructional day that currently exists, the impact is overwhelming.  SLIDE.  Such data demands that we look at ways to emulate and encourage the Japanese value of education to maximize the time we do devote to instruction.
  • Addtional info regarding attitudes towards valuing education:To understand the reason why moral education was supported by so many, one has to remember that in Japan there is a belief that education plays a larger role than teaching knowledge and skills – education is also to develop kokoro (spirit).  In an approach known as “whole-person education” (zenjinkyoiku), the aim is to get a balance between mental, intellectual, moral, and physical development (Okamoto,1992)  Japan is probably without peer in this regard. Japanese moral education emphasizes fundamental matters such as the value of life, the foolishness of fighting, the importance of friendship, the concern for the elderly.  Such an approach provide a dimension of education that is not found in the American primary school.  – Hood, 2001
  • Teacher’s extended competence are articulated as Level 1-competence in teacher student interaction (methods)Level 2-On-going planning –intentions around objectives, content, sequencing, and use of time-actualized in everyday planLevel 3- Collective, collaborative and continuous planning at the school level curriculaLevel 4-Collective reflection internalization of professional language
  • Gets all states on the same pageAllow state by state comparison•       All standards and expectations would be the same making progress and attainment measureable and comparable on a national scale•       Underperformance can be dealt with and success modeledCertification for teaching standards•       State qualifications be the same across the boardCould see where strengths/weakness areas are•       Certain disciplines in certain areas of the countryPost-Secondary Consistency•       A way to assess outside of the ACT, SAT, Etc.•       Other than Standardized testsRegulations could be the same•       Special Ed•       Pacing of StudentsStudents who move interstate benefit•       Broken homes allow student to not be left behind with a moveDisagreement between lawmakers•       Who decides what is important/ what is not importantOther aspects of education need to become uniform•       Starting date, days of school, salariesAvailability of educators•       Some need more training to cover topics wanted to cover in certain areas•       Not available in rural areasAssessment Pressures•       Pressure to perform•       Exam factoriesInclusion of other types of schools•       Private, charter, home schooled.Hidden Curriculums differ•       State by state things in between curriculum lines differ•       Limits creativity & freedom-no more teachable moment•       Special education, differentiationFederal Government power•       Allows the feds not the state where their funding should go•       Too much power to people that are not involved with the areaDifferent Cultures make up United States•       Different cultures value different aspects of education
  • Transcript

    • 1. Comparing to the best
      A Proposal of Focus
      to Improve Education in the
      United States
      1
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 2. "Education is not a sphere apart, but is subject to social and cultural osmosis. 
      Is there not a convergence between the styles of educational planning and decision making in the developed and developing countries of the world?  Human "capital" is an asset of concerns to all countries."
       
      ~ Curriculum Reform: An Overview of Trends.  1990 Malcolm Skilbeck, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation
      2
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 3. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
      Human Capital –
      To identify two countries to study in depth that have characteristics that suggest exemplary educational programs
      To recognize that there are strengths in the American Educational System
      Social Capital -
      To appreciate that identified characteristics will be more than programmatic and structural, but also attitudinal and cultural
      To create an exemplary program for our American students using the strengths of these three countries
      3
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 4. B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      4
    • 5. JapaneseConfucianism – Impact of Confucius on Japan’s Education
      In ancient times those who wished to bring harmony to the whole world would first bring order to their states. Those who wished to bring order to their states would first regulate the family. Those who wished to bring order to their families cultivate their own moral character. When the moral character is cultivated, the family will be regulated; when the family is regulated, the state will be in order, when the state is in order, the whole world will be pacified.
      - The Great Learning
      Fernandez, J.A. (2004). The Gentleman’s Code of Confucius: Leadership by Values. Organization Dynamics. Vol. 33, Issue 1, February 2004, Pages 21-31.
      5
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 6. Impact of Confucius on Japan’s Education
      Confucianism was introduced to Japan by the beginning of the seventh century but only became pervasive and influential in a modified from during the long Tokugawa Shogunate (1600-1868).
      Confucianism taught that education which did not produce good character was worthless and the men became virtuous officials by intensive study, disciplined repetition of proper forms, and observance of Confucius values.
      In Confucius circular, thinking knowledge created good character, good character led to good study habits, and good habits produced good academic achievement.
      To create hard workers and loyal and obedient subjects to the emperor and state, the post Meiji leaders deliberately revived and promoted Confucius values in the schools as state ideology.
      Consequently, early Japanese education emphasizes development of character more than intellectual development. Paradoxically, however, their whole-child approach produces a higher academic performance than Americans one focusing cognitive learning.
      Among eight goals of education, Japanese elementary school teachers ranked students “personal growth, fulfillment, and self-understand” and “human relation skills” first and second, but academic skills only seventh.
      Wry, H. (1999). Japanese and American Education. Retrieve July 14, 2009, from http://books.google.com/books?id=izkfEreOnacC&printsec=copyright&hl
      6
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 7. JAPAN
      The school in Japan is viewed as a “moral community”, being expected to maintain a high moral standard, which is supported by parents.  The teaching of morals and appropriate behavior  supports the creation of students  that are cooperative and well disciplined, and studious and so reduces the need for teachers to waste energy on maintaining order – Hood, 2001
      7
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 8. Classroom Behavior Comparison
      8
      National Center for Educational Statistics, 2007
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 9. Why do Finnish students do so well?
      9
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 10. Pisa Results - 2006
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      10
    • 11. Teacher Preparation - Finland
      • Finland’s universities have a recognized four year Teacher Education program leading to a master’s degree.
      • 12. In order to develop research-based thinking, a continuous interaction of research and practice in the pattern from the very beginning of the program
      • 13. A spiral curriculum is applied with core courses vertically integrated , and research methods courses integrated with other courses throughout the program
      11
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 14. Teacher PreparationFigure 2: Levels of teachers’ extended competence
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      12
      C 4b
      Reflection
      on action
      C 3
      C 2
      Curriculum
      work
      C 1
      Teacher
      Planning
      Reflection in action C4A
      Teaching
      action
    • 15. Curriculum -Essential Questions
      How would a national curriculum impact education in the United States?
      How would a national curriculum effect international test scores?
      June 1, 2009 – Common core standards initiative – Arnie Duncan
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      13
    • 16. Advantages/Disadvantages of how a National CurriculumEstablishes a Unified Educational Front
      Advantages –
      Gets all states on the same page Allow state by state comparison Certification for teaching standards Post-Secondary Consistency Regulations could be the same Students who move interstate benefit
      Disadvantages –
      Disagreement between lawmakers Other aspects of education need to become uniform Availability of educators Assessment Pressures Inclusion of other types of schools Hidden Curriculums differ Federal Government power Different Cultures make up United States
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      14
    • 17. National Curriculum….
      15
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 18. Creativity and Innovation
      The Finns rely on the electronics field, and telecommunications, and forest and mining industries to sustain their employment. 
      Educators believe Finland needs to ramp-up gifted programs and produce more "go-getters" the way the United States does.
      ~ Ellen Gamerman, 2009, The Wall Street Journal, February 29, 2008. Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
      16
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 19. "Cross-cultural differences in creative thinking were assessed for 51 American and 54 Japanese college students. The American college students showed statistically significantly higher scores on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) figural test than the Japanese college students. " 
      "...some American Japan-experts have been telling their compatriots to [academically] emulate Japan, Japanese Americanists have urged their compatriots to learn [creativity] from America. " (Kuniko Miyanaga, The Creative Edge, Transaction Publishers, 1993).
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      17
    • 20. Creativity and Ingenuity
      18
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 21. Creativity, Ingenuity and Innovation
      19
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
    • 22. The United States:Preparing for Global Competition and Internalization
      Teacher Preparation
      National Curriculum
      Value of Education
      Creativity and Innovation
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      20
    • 23. References –
      Abramson, Larry (2007, January 1). Conversation calls for National Education Curriculum. Retrieved May 2, 2007, from National Curriculum Web site: http://www.parent.org.uk/national.htm.
      Christopher Hood, 2001 Japan Education Reform
      National curriculum could dent education standards: Lemma AAP General News Wire. Sydney:Oct 6, 2006. p. 1.
      (Noriko Saeki, Xitao Fan, Lani Van Dusen, A comparative study of creative thinking of American And Japanese College Students, The Journal of Creative Behavior, Creative Education Foundation, Volume 35, Number 1 / First Quarter 2001).
      Rationing Education In an Era of Accountability Jennifer Booher-Jennings. Phi Delta Kappan. Bloomington:Jun 2006. Vol. 87, Iss. 10, p. 756-761 (6 pp.).
      Takakura, Sho.,Ono, Yumiko. Restructuring Teacher Education in Japan: Recent Developments in Personnel Management System, Eric Document.
      Westbury, Ian., Hansen, Sven-Erick., Kansanen, Pertti., Bjorkvist, Ole 2005. Teacher Education for Research-based Practice in Expanded Roles: Finland’s experience. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research
      Wry, H. (1999). Japanese and American Education. Retrieve July 14, 2009, from http://books.google.com/books?id=izkfEreOnacC&printsec=copyright&hl
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      21
    • 24. Comparative Education
      Dr. Stetar
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent,A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr–
      July, 2009
      ELMP 7774- Module 9
      B.Casey,J.Giaquinto,R.Martinez, M. Parent, A.Petruzzelli,P.Sirichantr – July, 2009 ELMP 7774- 9
      22

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