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Strategies for Performance Alignment in the GOC

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Presentation to Infonex conference on Public Sector Performance Management - Sept 2013 (Ottawa)

Presentation to Infonex conference on Public Sector Performance Management - Sept 2013 (Ottawa)

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  • 1. Strategies for Performance Alignment Mike Haley, Performance Alignment Practice Lead Public Sector Performance Management Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013
  • 2. Presentation Overview • Public Sector Driving Forces for Performance Alignment • Aligning Business Management Perspectives • Planning, Risk, Project & Resource Management • Links to Efficiency Management • Role & Value of Performance Technology • Key Strategies for Performance Alignment – “The Three A’s” • Case Studies in Performance Alignment • Fisheries & Oceans Canada • Health Canada Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 2 2
  • 3. Insightful Quotes on Performance…. “However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.” “Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.” Sir Winston Churchill 1874-1965 Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 3 3
  • 4. From Performance Measurement to Performance Alignment Organizational Performance Maturity ...the use of performance management techniques __for coordinating the activities and resources ___necessary to ensure all aspects of business ____management (i.e. planning, risk management Alignment _____and project management) are integrated. Management …the adoption of practices and tools by _which an organization establishes __strategic and operational plans and then ___executes and adjusts these plans using ____performance measurement data. Measurement Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 …the definition & collection of data _used by organizations to track __progress against stated goals, ___objectives and intended results. 4 4
  • 5. Clerk’s Priorities for 2013 & Beyond 1. A FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE AND PRODUCTIVITY “The bottom line is that the work of every employee counts, so we must create the conditions that empower all public servants to give their best” 2. EMBRACING ENTERPRISE APPROACHES “by working collaboratively across our organizations and reducing duplication of effort, streamlining our processes, taking advantage of new technologies, we will improve our services, increase our productivity, and reduce costs.” 3. WORKING TOGETHER FOR BETTER OUTCOMES “We achieve the best outcomes for citizens when we work collaboratively across our organizations and beyond.” Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 5 5 5
  • 6. Blueprint 2020 – Living the Vision – Whole-of Government • Effective and efficient business processes that draw on collective expertise to achieve economies of scale in areas of common interest across the Public Service while maintaining high standards of quality, accessibility and equity of services to Canadians. • Flexible funding arrangements and enterprise-wide systems to simplify pooling of resources and ensure teamwork between departments and programs. • Regular review of programs and services to help the Government determine whether they are still required and whether adjustments are needed to ensure that they are effective, efficient and focused on the needs of Canadians. Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 6 6 6
  • 7. Blueprint 2020 – Living the Vision – Smart Use of Technology • Affordable, e-enabled and seamless services providing for “tell us once” information gathering, thereby enhancing self-service and customized services. • A single, standardized technological infrastructure with supporting applications and systems to reduce the costs of basic IT services, and to make it easier to use the wealth of data available from new sources in developing evidence-based analysis and innovative solutions. • Interoperable systems to ensure timely access to information and management data needed to support trend analysis and scenariobuilding. Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 7 7 7
  • 8. Blueprint 2020 – Living the Vision – High Performance • Agile individuals and organizations with modern workplaces that support teamwork and a range of employment and mobility models helping people to work where and when needed while recognizing the value of specialists in key domains. • Adept Public Service managers and leaders welcoming ideas and perspectives, fostering high levels of engagement, performance and productivity, developing employees, and creating opportunities to keep learning and growing that will help people achieve their best in all their endeavours. • Modern, flexible working methods that mobilize expertise and that unleash creativity and productivity in a supportive environment, to meet and exceed performance expectations without compromising personal lives or health outcomes. Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 8 8 8
  • 9. Expected Benefits for Performance Management Delivering Public Service for the Future: Navigating the Shifts Accenture study (2012) Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 9 9
  • 10. Value Proposition for Performance Alignment • Senior Management & Employee Engagement • • Clearly Defined Expectations • • Involvement in Development Process Improved Change Management Capacity Enhanced Decision Making Capacity • • Resource Requirements (i.e. Value for Money or “Efficiency & Economy”) • • Results Against Expectations Support for Strategic Reviews Reduced Time & Effort on Planning, Reporting & Evaluation • • Consistent Approach Across Department (“Economies of Scale”) • • Departmental Reporting – RPP/DPR, PMF, Horizontal Initiatives Evaluations (“Built In” by design) Improved Compliance with Central Agency Requirements • TBS Policies & Directives • MAF Ratings & Action Plans • OAG Findings / Recommendations / Action Plans Drives an Organizational Performance Culture Shift! Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 10 10
  • 11. The Logic Model as a Performance Plan A Foundation for Performance Alignment Strategic Outcome Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Performance Indicators Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Performance Indicators Departmental Business or Program Plan Strategic Outcome Performance Indicators Output Performance Plan Performance Indicators (Logic model) Output Effect (Outcomes) Departmental Business or Program Structure Line of Sight Regions Performance Indicators Output Cause (Outputs) Units Directorates Branches Accountability Planning Cross Functional Teams (Business Structure) Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 11 11
  • 12. Performance Alignment within the Evaluation Function Key Components of a Performance Measurement Strategy Introduction Relevance 1. Program Profile 1.1 Need for the program 1.2 Alignment with government priorities 1.3 Target population(s) 1.4 Stakeholders 1.5 Governance Efficiency & Effectiveness Performance 1.6 Resources 2. Logic Model Inputs 2.1 Logic model Activities Outputs Intermediate Outcomes Immediate Outcomes Ultimate Outcomes 2.2 Narrative 3. PM Strategy Framework Data Indicator Frequency Baseline Source 3.1 PM Strategy Framework Target Organization Date to Data and position achieve management responsible for target system data collection 3.2 Accountabilities and reporting 4. Evaluation Strategy 4.1 Requirements, timelines and responsibilities 4.2 Draft evaluation framework and data requirements A Guide to Developing Performance Measurement Strategies (Sept 2010) Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 12 12
  • 13. Enhanced Integrated Business Planning Senior Management Process Output External Requirement Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) Corporate Risk Profile Corporate Business Plan RPP / DPR Program/Functional Business Plans EX Performance Management Agreements (PMA) Departmental Priorities Evaluation Program/Functional PM Strategies Logic Models (Inputs > Outcomes) Logic Models (Outputs > Outcomes) Logic Models Inputs (Resources) > Activities > Outputs Employee Performance Appraisals Operational Work Plans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 13
  • 14. What is Risk Management? A Risk is . . . . • • A threat or opportunity that an action or event will adversely or beneficially affect an organization’s ability to achieve its objectives Expressed in terms of the likelihood (probability) of occurrence and the degree of impact (consequence) if it should occur Risk Management is . . . . • • • A systematic approach to setting the best course of action for managing uncertainty by identifying, assessing, understanding, making decisions on and communicating risk issues A continuous, proactive and systematic process to understand, manage and communicate risk from an organization-wide perspective. It is about supporting strategic decision-making that contributes to the achievement of an organization's overall objectives A risk-informed approach to management builds risk management into existing governance and organizational structures, including business planning, decision-making and operational processes. Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 14 14
  • 15. Risk Management Alignment with the Performance Plan Risk Management Process Identify Risk Factors Risk Factor Indicators Strategic Outcome Assess & Prioritize Risk Risk Assessment Indicators Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Intermediate Outcome Organizational Business or Program Plan Develop Risk Mitigation Strategy Risk Mitigation Indicators Immediate Outcome Output Performance Plan Strategic Outcome (Logic Model) Output Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Strategic/Corporate Risks Output Operational/Program Risks Corporate Risk Profile Program Risk Profiles Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 15 15
  • 16. Aligning the Project Management Perspective Elements of Project Management – PM-BOK (PMI) Scope Indicators Risk Management KNOWLEDGE AREAS Scope Management Risk Indicators Time Management Schedule Indicators Cost Management Human Resources Management Resource Indicators Procurement Management Quality Management Outcome Indicators Communications Management Integration Management Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 Process Management 16 16
  • 17. Project Management Alignment Strategic Projects Operational Projects Departmental Business or Program Plan Strategic Outcome Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Performance Plan Strategic Outcome (Logic Model) Output Intermediate Outcome Project Management Process Output Define Project Scope Assess Project Risks Project Scope Indicators Project Risk Indicators Immediate Outcome Develop Project Schedule Project Schedule Indicators Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 Output Establish Project Resources Project Resource Indicators 17 17
  • 18. Resource Management Alignment Risk Management Process Departmental Business or Program Plan Strategic Outcome Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Resource Management Output Financial Management Financial Indicators Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Workforce Management Strategic Outcome Output Intermediate Outcome Immediate Outcome Workforce/HR Indicators Asset Management Output Asset Indicators Plan Management Process Define Project Scope Assess Project Risks Develop Project Schedule What’s Missing? Activities Establish Project Resources Project Management Process Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 18 18
  • 19. Activity-Based Planning via Business Process Mapping $$$ Inputs (Asset) “Resources we pay for” M2 $$$ Field Team $$$ $$$ Equipment (Workforce) (External) (Asset) Labour Hrs Contractors Eq. Hrs Labour Hrs Activities “What we do” Calls Visits Outputs “What products & services we supply” Inspection # Inspections Surveys Support Call Site Visit Financial Effect Operational Cause Building Surveys Assessment Activity, Output, & Program Cost or “Cost to Serve” # Assessments Program/Client Demands Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 19 19
  • 20. Benefits of Business Process Mapping OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Resource Allocations & Work Planning Capacity Analysis Efficiency Indicators Business Process Mapping FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Planning & Budgeting Transfer Pricing “Value for Money” CLIENT MANAGEMENT Service Standards Cost to Serve / Cost Recovery User Fee Pricing Strategies STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Program Rationalization Scenario Playing – “What-if” Shared Services Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 20 20
  • 21. Linking Efficiency, Effectiveness & Performance Business Process Map Resources Ultimately Dictate Performance Achievement $$$ Resources Capacity Efficiency Indicators Activities Performance Targets Are Bounded by Resources ! Strategic Outcome Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Performance Indicators Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Performance Indicators Departmental Business or Program Plan Strategic Outcome Performance Planning Efficiency Indicators Output Efficiency Indicators Output Performance Indicators Intermediate Outcome Performance Indicators Immediate Outcome Efficiency Indicators Output (Logic model) Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 21 21
  • 22. Evaluation Techniques for Assessing Resources High-Level Performance Story Focus on Outputs > Outcomes Focus on Inputs > Outputs Source: TBS Evaluators’ Workshop: Scoping and Assessing Program Resource Utilization When Evaluating Federal Programs (March 2013) Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 22 22
  • 23. Theory of Change – Linking Plans and Risks TBS-CEE (Dec 2012) • Unpacks/expands the logic model into “theories” of how each step in the logic is intended to work (i.e. the “story” of what should “happen” in the arrows that link boxes on a logic model) • Theories include context, mechanisms, assumptions and risks that might support/hinder a step from working as planned Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 23 23
  • 24. Activity-Based Planning via Business Process Mapping $$$ Inputs (Asset) “Resources we pay for” $$$ Capacity = 4000 Actual = 3800 Utilization = 95% M2 Field Team (Workforce) $$$ Capacity Resource Labour Hrs Consumption Rate = Labour Hrs / Visit Equipment (Asset) Capacity = 720 Actual = 504 Utilization = 70% $$$ Contractors (External) Eq. Hrs Labour Hrs Activities “What we do” Activity Consumption Rate = Visits / Inspection Outputs “What products & services we supply” Cost per Unit of Work $ / Call Surveys Calls Visits Inspection # Inspections Efficiency Indicators Support Call Site Visit Output Cycle Time = days per Assessment Financial Effect Operational Cause Building Surveys Assessment # Assessments Program/Client Demands Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 Cost per Unit of Output $ / Assessment Activity, Output, & Program Cost or Cost per Unit of Demand “Cost to Serve” $ / Client 24 24
  • 25. Technology as a Performance Alignment “Enabler” Compliant but Lethargic Aligned & Adaptive A “Performance Culture” Education & Facilitation Desired Path Performance Understanding Maturity Best Practice: Phased Approach Evasive & Apathetic Reactive but Apprehensive Performance Information Enablement Adapted from “The Performance Management Revolution”, Dresner, H. (2007) IM/IT Software and/or Infrastructure Investment Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 25 25
  • 26. Key Performance Technologies – Dashboards Dashboards Scorecarding Purpose • Reporting & Analysis on Available Data (i.e. Graphs, Comparisons, Drill Downs, Links to Contextual Information ) • Coordinate Strategic & Business Planning , Performance Reporting & Analysis Focus • Reactive: Historical Results • Predictive: Potential Results Type of Data • Mainly Structured • Structured & Unstructured (Quantitative) • Ad-hoc Data Analysis • Initiative/Project Management • Little or no training required • Commentaries • Causal Relationships • Custom Reporting • Focus on Today’s Results Primary Use • Risk Analysis / Relationships • Exception Reporting (i.e. Traffic Lighting) Challenges • Understanding Causal Relationships & Interdependencies • Historical Differences (Trends) Advantages • Customized Reporting (Quantitative & Qualitative) • Education & Training • Reporting & Data Analysis • Planning & Alignment • Anecdotal Evidence Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 26 26
  • 27. Dashboard Examples Hundreds of solutions ranging from homegrown web applications to MS Office to Enterprise Technology Vendors Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 27 27
  • 28. Using Technology to Enable Performance Alignment Dashboards Project Dashboard Resource Dashboard Planning Dashboard Risk Dashboard Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 28 28
  • 29. Key Performance Technologies Dashboards vs. Scorecarding Dashboards Scorecarding Purpose • Reporting & Analysis on Available Data (i.e. Graphs, Comparisons, Drill Downs, Links to Contextual Information ) • Coordinate Strategic & Business Planning , Performance Reporting & Analysis Focus • Reactive: Historical Results • Predictive: Potential Results Type of Data • Mainly Structured • Structured & Unstructured (Quantitative) • Ad-hoc Data Analysis • Initiative/Project Management • Little or no training required • Commentaries • Causal Relationships • Custom Reporting • Focus on Today’s Results Primary Use • Risk Analysis / Relationships • Exception Reporting (i.e. Traffic Lighting) Challenges • Understanding Causal Relationships & Interdependencies • Historical Differences (Trends) Advantages • Customized Reporting (Quantitative & Qualitative) • Education & Training • Reporting & Data Analysis • Planning & Alignment “The Dials” • Anecdotal Evidence “Moving the Dials” Gary Cokins, Author & Enterprise Performance Management Specialist, Analytics-Based Performance Management LLC. 29 Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 29
  • 30. Using Technology to Enable Performance Alignment Scorecarding Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 30 30
  • 31. Performance Alignment “Value Chain” Integrated Management Realization • • • • Quality Performance Content & Data Plan Performance Risk Performance Project Performance Resource Performance Performance Awareness & Decision Cycle Performance Technology • • • • • Planning Alignment • Data Models • Data Architecture Performance Content Design & Development Cycle Planning/Collaboration Operational Modeling BI / Dashboards Scorecarding Organizational Engagement Performance Tools • Guides • Templates • Training • Performance Messaging • Employee Participation • Performance Based Decision Making Performance Practices Performance Enablers Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 31 31
  • 32. “Three A’s” for Building a Sustainable Organizational Performance Culture 3. Attain • Establish suitable governance and promote performance capacity building 2. Align • Identify disconnects and close gaps in performance planning & reporting 1. Assess • Use a structured methodology to evaluate existing “Performance Culture” Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 32 32
  • 33. Step 1: Assessment of Performance Maturity • Establish a small central group responsible to lead the transition to a performance management culture • Establish a structured and consistent approach for reviewing and assessing performance information requirements • Analyze current status across multiple performance perspectives (i.e. Plans, Risks, Projects, Resources) • Assess current state of Performance Enablers • Determine the desired level of maturity for end-state • Identify gaps and/or disconnects that are/could hinder progress • Establish milestone targets for evolution in Performance Maturity Establish the Transition Plan Environmental Scan Option Analysis Option Development Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 Implementation 33 33
  • 34. Performance Alignment Maturity Model (PAMM) © Management – Ottawa – Sept Inc.(2013) Public Sector Performance Copyright Landmark Decisions 24, 2013 34 34
  • 35. Step 2: Align and Extend Performance Content • Active commitment and support from senior managers • Commence alignment of risks, projects and resource allocation to the logic model (Performance Plan) • Develop and implement performance tools and data management practices • Introduce performance technologies to facilitate access to and reporting of performance information • Provide baseline training and education to all employees • Revise decision making practices and procedures to access and utilize performance information • Reinforce new practices / procedures and the advancement of a performance culture change through communications and messaging Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 35 35
  • 36. Step 3: Attain Sustainability and Continuous Improvement • Maintain the active commitment and support from senior managers through continual enhancements to content for decision making • Comprehensive multi-dimensional performance monitoring and reporting for planning, risks, projects, resources • Implement data integration and analysis, detailed dashboards, scorecarding, data trending, and dynamic alerts • Develop fully costed program / process and outcome models. Link resources to targets. • Central coordination team evolves into a Centre of Expertise and becomes a core Knowledge Management resource • Ongoing communications and messaging to inculcate the performance management culture Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 36 36
  • 37. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans • Fiscal 10-11 – Launch of One Pass Planning (OPP) process • Winter 2012 – Review of key issues for the development of a Performance Information Management System • Fall 2012 – Development of a “Performance Action Plan” • Better alignment of P&RM and Evaluation Directorates • Development of common performance indicator templates, guides and training • Winter 2013 – Proof of Concept (POC) visualizations around an integrated planning (OPP) and performance reporting solution – Business Intelligence Gateway (BIG) • Fiscal 13-14 – Exploration of options to bring BIG vision to fruition Ryan Ziegler, Manager Performance & Risk Management Fisheries & Oceans Canada ryan.ziegler@dfo-mpo.gc.ca 613.993.2155 Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 37 37
  • 38. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 38 38
  • 39. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 39 39
  • 40. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 40 40
  • 41. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 41 41
  • 42. Performance Alignment Case Study – Fisheries & Oceans Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 42 42
  • 43. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada • Fiscal 10-11 – Launch of Integrated Planning & Performance Reporting Solution (IPPRS) across Health Canada • Winter 2011 – Introduction of Executive Committee (EC) Departmental Dashboard • Fall 2012 – Visualizations into the potential of a scorecarding solution for planning & performance reporting • Spring 2013 – Approval of Stage 2 for an Integrated Financial and Non-Financial Planning & Performance solution – Planning for Enterprise Performance (PEP) • Fiscal 13-14 – Blueprinting of Financial and Operational planning processes with Proof of Concept(s) and continued dialog with OGD’s Randy Legault, Director Performance Data & Analytics Health Canada randy.legault@hc-sc.gc.ca 613.946.6368 Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 43 43
  • 44. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 44 44
  • 45. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 45 45
  • 46. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 46 46
  • 47. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada For Illustration Only – Fictitious Information Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 47 47
  • 48. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada For Illustration Only – Fictitious Information Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 48 48
  • 49. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada For Illustration Only – Fictitious Information Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 49 49
  • 50. Performance Alignment Case Study – Health Canada Alignment of Current Planning & Reporting Environment Information Presentation Layer Crystal Departmental Dashboard • Mainly Tactical vs. Strategic • Programs Performance • Corporate Performance Human Resources Xcelsius Reports Online Custom BI Applications • HR Demographics OWP Optimization Planning Application Layer Budget Development & Adjustments Management Reporting System (MRS) & Management Variance Reporting (MVR) • Financial Reporting • Forecasting • Budget Management BMF Optimization DIOP Optimization • RADAR, etc. • Operational Work Planning • Financials, IM/IT Requirements, Travel • Deliverables, Milestones & Indicators IPPRS • Dept. Integrated Operational Planning • Dept/Branch Priorities • ARLU, Funding profile, Pressures • Risk Register • HRM Requirements & Issues • Investment Planning • Assets & Acquired Services • IM/IT Requirements ERP Layer • Funds / Budget Mgmt & Control (DG Level) FM SAP - CO • Cost Centre Accounting • Project Systems MDM • Operational Budgeting (CCM/Bureau) PeopleSoft • HR Details Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 50 50 50
  • 51. Thank You for Listening! Mike Haley 902.499.5425 (c) mhaley@landmark.ca Public Sector Performance Management – Ottawa – Sept 24, 2013 51