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Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung
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Dorset NLP Forum Jan 2012 - Jung

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Originally presented by Mike Forte at the Dorset NLP Forum, Dorset, UK in January 2012. …

Originally presented by Mike Forte at the Dorset NLP Forum, Dorset, UK in January 2012.
Presentation on aspects of Carl Jung, his teachings and applications of these.
This includes an overview of some of Jung's key principles, the uses of the Tarot and Mandalas.

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  • any of the worlds of higher, spiritual or divine archetypes, or any of the Gods or Cosmic Powers that inhabit those worlds (as explained in Neo-Platonism, Gnosticism, Kabbalah, etc etc)the wider or greater psychic reality beyond the individual ego and personality, especially the Numinocosmthe earlier or parallel para-physical realities, such as are described by Blavatsky and Steiner under the headings of previous Rounds, Root Races, etcthe lower, atavistic, sub-physical reality, which a number of occultists have attuned to.
  • Jung taught that the psyche consists of various systems including the personal unconsciouswith its complexes and a collective unconscious with its archetypes. Jung's theory of a personal unconscious is quite similar to Freud’s creation of a region containing a person's repressed, forgotten or ignored experiences. However, Jung considered the personal unconscious to be a "more or less superficial layer of the unconscious." Within the personal unconscious are what he called "feeling-toned complexes." He said that "they constitute the personal and private side of psychic life.” These are feelings and perceptions organized around significant persons or events in the person's life. Jung believed that there was a deeper and more significant layer of the unconscious, which he called the collective unconscious, with what he identified as archetypes, which he believed were innate, unconscious, and generally universal. Jung's collective unconscious has been described as a "storehouse of latent memory traces inherited from man's ancestral past, a past that includes not only the racial history of man as a separate species but his pre-human or animal ancestry as well.” Therefore, Jung's theory incorporates Darwin's theory of evolution as well as ancient mythology. Jung taught that this collective unconscious is shared by all people and is therefore universal. However, since it is unconscious, not all people are able to tap into it. Jung saw the collective unconscious as the foundational structure of personality on which the personal unconscious and the ego are built. Because he believed that the foundations of personality are ancestral and universal, he studied religions, mythology, rituals, symbols, dreams and visions.
  • The self is an archetype that represents the unification of the unconscious and conscious of an individual. The creation of the self occurs through a process known as individuation, in which the various aspects of personality are integrated. Jung often represented the self as a circle, square or mandala.The shadow is an archetype that consists of the sex and life instincts. The shadow exists as part of the unconscious mind and is composed of repressed ideas, weaknesses, desires, instincts and shortcomings. This archetype is often described as the darker side of the psyche, representing wildness, chaos and the unknown. These latent dispositions are present in all of us, Jung believed, although people sometimes deny this element of their own psyche and instead project it onto others.Jung suggested that the shadow can appear in dreams or visions and may take a variety of forms. It might appear as a snake, a monster, a demon, a dragon or some other dark, wild or exotic figure. The shadow can manifest itself in projection of our own, unrecognised characteristics onto others…The anima is a feminine image in the male psyche and the animus is a male image in the female psyche. The anima/animus represents the "true self" rather than the image we present to others and serves as the primary source of communication with the collective unconscious.The combination of the anima and animus is known as the syzygy, or the divine couple. The syzygy represents completion, unification and wholeness.The persona is how we present ourselves to the world. The word "persona" is derived from a Latin word that literally means "mask.“ It is not a literal mask, however. The persona represents all of the different social masks that we wear among different groups and situations. It acts to shield the ego from negative images. According to Jung, the persona may appear in dreams and take a number of different forms.
  • In modern times, researchers have been able to collect and compare the myths, legends, and religions of cultures from around the world. They have been fascinated to discover that for centuries, people who had no contact with each other at all had passed down stories whose characters and events were strikingly similar. Many great thinkers have tried to explain this phenomenon. Noted psychoanalyst Carl Jung introduced a theory that humans have a collective unconscious, which means that there is a store of information that we, as humans, somehow hold. This collection of information includes archetypes, or symbolic figures. Archetypes influence the way we think and behave, as people follow the same patterns throughout time and around the world.
  • Tarot decks were originally produced to be used as playing cards... There was a popular game called Tarocchi... Or Trumps.There were 4 suits and a set of Trumps. The suits are called the Minor Arcana, and the Trumps are called the Major Arcana.Each of the suits in the old decks had 10 ‘pip’ cards and between 3 and 6 Court Cards. Playing card decks these days have 3 Court cards and Tarot decks have 4 Court cards.The 4 suits that you see in normal playing card decks equate to the 4 suits of the Tarot. In fact, all over Europe, the original cards are still used... This set is a Neopolitan deck...The suits of Coins, Wands, Cups and Swords equate to the modern day Diamonds, Clubs, Hearts and Spades... (the Italian for Sword is Espada)In Tarot reading, the Major Arcana deal with large or global themes and the Minor Arcana deal with daily details...The earliest Tarot decks that survive today were hand-painted for the Italian family Visconti Sforza who ruled Milan in the 16th centuryThere are only three of these decks in existence and none of them are complete...In terms of old tarot decks, the Marseilles Tarot deck is still popular today and very widely used, especially in Latin countries.The most popular deck in use today in English-speaking countries is the Rider – Waite deck. Created in 1909 by A. E. Waite, illustrated by Pamela Colman Smith and published in London by the Rider Publishing company ... Which I have used in these slides...
  • 0.  The Fool is the happy wanderer who sees the world through the eyes of a child. Most tarot experts agree that the Fool represents each of us—naive travelers through life, off on a grand adventure, out to learn whatever experience the tarot can teach us. This is the Divine Child Archetype... 1.  The Magician is the skilled and cunning master of all he surveys. He represents an individual in control of life’s tools and techniques, like those on the table in front of him. Typically, they include a cup, sword, pentacle, and wand—the four symbols of the Minor Arcana. This is the Jungian archetype of the Trickster... 2.  The High Priestess is the enigmatic keeper of spiritual secrets. Secretive and guarded, she knows the secrets life holds—but she shares them only with the wise. This is the Jungian Archetype of the Wise Woman... 3.  The Empressis the archetypal mother who nurtures and protects all of her creation, including humankind. This is the Jungian Anima archetype. 4.  The Emperor is the authoritative protector and provider who rules the known world. A father figure, he brings order out of chaos so that civilization can prosper. This is the Jungian Animus archetype... 5.  The Hierophant is a symbol of traditional authority and influence. He’s the head of a hierarchy, determined to maintain his religious and cultural traditions. This represents the Jungian archetype of the Persona... The social Mask that we all present to the world. 6.  The Loversembody the twin principles of opposition and attraction. While an appearance by this couple could encourage any hopeless romantic, the card also signifies a choice that needs to be made between two equally strong desires. Need to commit heartfelt loyalty to one path, one person or one task 7.  The Chariot is a vehicle for forward motion and change. The young charioteer is in command of his physical and emotional drives, even when they seem to oppose each other. For Jungians this represents our internal struggle between the ego and the shadow...
  • 8.  Strength is the lovely lady with the heart of a lion. She gently holds the jaws of a powerful wild cat, patiently controlling a force that could otherwise eat her alive. This is the Jungian archetype of the Hero or Heroine – A mythological and supremely self-confident self... 9.  The Hermit is a recluse, far removed from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. He reflects on spiritual concerns, and carries the light of wisdom as a beacon for others to follow. Time to reflect... The Jungian archetype of the Wise Old Man...10.  The Wheel of Fortune is the spinning wheel of destiny and fate. Because nothing is certain but change itself, the Wheel of Fortune reminds us all that what goes up must also come down. We need to be aware of things beyond our control: “God grant me the courage to change the things I can, the serenity to accept the things I can’t and the wisdom to know the difference...”11.  Justice is both the giver and enforcer of laws. As the ultimate arbiter, she holds a two-edged sword—a reminder that fairness cuts both ways. Equates to Karma... We will be rewarded for the good we do, and punished for the evil we do...12.  The Hanged Mansacrifices his comfort and passions for a time, knowing that better things will occur as a result. He is the visionary who sacrifices one life to be rewarded with another. Looking for spiritual enlightenment and psychic revelation... Beyond the material and mundane... Willingness' to make a sacrifice13.  Death is the card of transition. Like the Grim Reaper, who clears away all that cannot survive, the card depicts the turning of a page, the completion of one chapter of life, and the exciting start of a new story. New things cannot be started without old ones coming to an end... One door closes and another one opens...14.  Temperance is the archangel of balance. With dexterity and grace, Temperance demonstrates that moderation can serve as a bridge to wholeness. Learn patience rather than rushing forward headlong with your eyes closed...
  • 15.  The Devil is the dark and shadowy side of our existence. With tongue firmly in cheek, he demonstrates how a selfish devotion to material possessions and ill-conceived passions can tie us down and keep us from true happiness. This is the archetypical Shadow self... Our internal demons...16.  The Tower is a forceful clearing of pent-up energy that strikes like lightning. It’s a bolt from the blue, and it can shake any overbuilt structure to its foundation. Change can come out of the blue and can be positive or negative. Sometimes even apparently negative change cam bring positive results... “Until I lost the roof of my house, I never realised how beautiful the night sky was...” Overcoming black and white thinking17.  The Star is a shining light in the darkness. Like the goddess of the night, she’s the blithe spirit who offers hope, inspiration, and guidance. No matter how dark the road might seem, hope, courage and inspiration will bring the promise of better days to come...18.  The Moon is the ever-changing mirror of the sun, and a symbol of the unconscious mind. From its perch in the night sky, the moon represents secrets and mysteries that may not be understood—or even recognised. I warns us to be aware that illusions and hidden forces can obscure what’s really happening. It also represents our imaginative and creative side.19.  The Sun is a symbol of consciousness and action. It’s the centre of the universe, and the source of heat, illumination, and life on earth.  In the light of the Sun, the Fool has come out of the darkness and into a new awareness and strength. Revitalised by the power of life’s journey, he is at his strongest and ready to shine...20.  Judgment reveals all, heralds the dawn of a new world, and stands as a reminder of the power of forgiveness. Resurrection, the rebirth that comes with spiritual awareness. Arriving rat this step in his journey, the Fool understands the possibilities of transformation that can come with change. The Fool reaches for enlightenment.21. The World depicts the never-ending, spiral dance of life. It’s a card of completion, achievement and success—as well as the chance to start another round. The Fool understands that life encompasses more than himself and his own journey. He is ready to begin again on a new cycle of learning: He can be reincarnated from the world of experience back to the innocence of the Fool...
  • Transcript

    • 1. Archetypes, Tarot and Mandalas (...and synchronicity... and collective unconscious... and... Individuation...) A lucky dip of Jungian thought... No psycho-therapists were harmed psycho- in the preparation of this presentationNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 1
    • 2. A (not so) Jung man’s confession: I am certainly not an expert... I don’t understand most of it... The more I learn the less I understand... I can share what I have found... I am a Fool at the beginning of a very long journey... There are patterns and themes emerging... If you want to explore with me then I would love that... Come lo stolto nel tarocchi... Like the Fool in the Tarot {welcome everywhere}NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 2
    • 3. ...So who was Carl Gustav Jung...?NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 3
    • 4. Carl Gustav Jung Born July 26, 1875 - Died June 6, 1961, in Zurich .NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 4
    • 5. ... about Carl (Karl) Gustav Jung • Swiss psychiatrist and the founder of analytical psychology. • Jung is one of the best known researchers in the field of dream analysis and symbolisation. • Spent a lot of his time studying Eastern and Western philosophy, alchemy, astrology, and sociology, as well as literature and the arts. • Individuation is the central concept of Jung’s analytical psychology. • Many psychological concepts were first proposed by Jung, including the archetype, the collective unconscious, the complex, and synchronicity. A popular psychometric instrument, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), has been principally developed from Jungs theories. • His interest in philosophy and the occult led many to view him as a mystic although Jungs ambition was to be seen as a man of science.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 5
    • 6. ...tell me more... • In 1895, Jung studied medicine at the University of Basel. In 1900, he worked in the Burghölzli, a psychiatric hospital in Zurich, with Eugen Bleuler. His dissertation, published in 1903, was titled "On the Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena." This is when he met, treated and (allegedly) had an affair with Sabina Spielrein • In 1906, he published Studies in Word Association and later sent a copy of this book to Sigmund Freud. • A close friendship developed and spanned some six years . • In 1912 Jung published Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido (known in English as Psychology of the Unconscious) resulting in a theoretical divergence between him and Freud and consequently a break in their friendship, both stating that the other was unable to admit he could possibly be wrong. • After this falling-out, Jung went through a pivotal and difficult psychological transformation. Henri Ellenberger called Jungs experience a "creative illness" and compared it to Freuds period of what he called “neurasthenia and hysteria”.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 6
    • 7. ...tell me more... • During World War I Jung was drafted as an army doctor and soon made commandant of an internment camp for British officers and soldiers (Swiss neutrality obliged the Swiss to intern personnel from either side of the conflict who crossed their frontier to evade capture). Jung worked to improve the conditions for these soldiers stranded in neutral territory; he encouraged them to attend university courses. • Jung continued to publish books until the end of his life, including Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies (1959), which analyzed the archetypal meaning and possible psychological significance of the reported observations of UFOs. • He also enjoyed a friendship with an English Roman Catholic priest, Father Victor White, who corresponded with Jung after he had published his controversial Answer to Job. • In 1944, Jung published Psychology and Alchemy, where he analysed the alchemical symbols and showed a direct relationship to the psychoanalytical process. • Jung died on 6 June 1961 at Küsnacht, after a short illness.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 7
    • 8. Summary • Jungs work on himself and his patients convinced him that life has a spiritual purpose beyond material goals. • Our main task, he believed, is to discover and fulfil our deep innate potential. • Based on his study of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Gnosticism, Taoism, and other traditions, Jung believed that this journey of transformation, which he called individuation, is at the mystical heart of all religions It is a journey to meet religions. the self and at the same time to meet the Divine. • Unlike Sigmund Freud, Jung thought spiritual experience was essential to our well-being. well-NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 8
    • 9. A Dangerous Method UK Release Date : 12th February 2012 Keira Knightley Sabina Spielrein Viggo Mortensen Sigmund Freud Michael Fassbender Carl JungNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 9
    • 10. ...and for Shoshi (Queen of the pun)...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 10
    • 11. ...The Collective Unconscious...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 11
    • 12. Evolution... But how?NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 12
    • 13. Nature versus Nurture Genes versus Memes Blah... Blah... Blah...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 13
    • 14. *Richard Dawkins – The Selfish Gene Memes = origins of behaviour, a unit of cultural transmission, or Genes = origins of a unit of imitation* physical characteristics, a biological unitNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 14
    • 15. There is, however... a very disturbing but ...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 15
    • 16. Genes + Memes ≠ 1 So... Where’s the gap...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 16
    • 17. Could it be an inherited memory... A Collective Unconscious...?NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 17
    • 18. Drawn through the Myths of Time...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 18
    • 19. Schools of thought on Inherited social memory... Joseph Campbell / Alexander Eliot- Eliot- The Hero’s Journey / The Monomyth / Global Myths Nikolaas Tinbergen/ Konrad Lorenz / Jungian Psychology - Paul Ekman– Ekman– Collective Evolutionary Psychology / Unconsciousness / The Human Condition / Archetypes Cultural Universals / Micro- Micro- Expressions / Ethology Clare Graves / Ken Wilber / Don Beck– Beck– Spiral Dynamics / Theory of Everything / AQAL / IntegralNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 19
    • 20. Levels of Consciousness The Unconscious : A basic tenet: All products of the unconscious are symbolic and can be taken as guiding messages. What is the dream or fantasy leading the person toward? The unconscious will live, and will move us, whether we like it or not. Personal unconscious: That aspect of the psyche which does not usually enter the individuals awareness and which appears in overt behaviour or in dreams. It is the source of new thoughts and creative ideals, and produces meaningful symbols. Collective unconscious: That aspect of the unconscious which manifests inherited, universal themes which run through all human life. Inwardly, the whole history of the human race, back to the most primitive times, lives on in us.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 20
    • 21. The Jung Man’s View Collective Unconscious - Universal Archetypal Processes Anima / Animus – Opposite Sex Qualities Shadow – Denied Psychic Material Subconscious Memories Persona – Projected Image / Mask Conscious Ego – Own Self ImageNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 21
    • 22. ...Archetypes...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 22
    • 23. Archetypes These symbolic primordial images reflect basic patterns or universal themes common to us all which are present in the unconscious and exist outside space and time. We’re all pre-programmed to look for pre- archetypes in our everyday lives, because they serve as a framework for our understanding of the world.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 23
    • 24. Jungian Archetypes Archetypes are innate, universal prototypes for ideas and may be used to interpret observations. A group of memories and interpretations associated with an archetype is a complex ( e.g. a mother complex associated with the mother archetype). Jung treated the archetypes as psychological organs, analogous to physical ones in that both are constructs that arose through evolution. Jung identified five major archetypes, but also believed that there was no limit to the number that may exist: •The Self / Ego, the regulating center of the psyche and facilitator of individuation, •The Shadow, the opposite of the Ego image, often containing qualities with which the ego does not identify, but which it possesses nonetheless. The shadow can manifest itself in projection of our own, unrecognised characteristics onto others… •The Anima, the feminine image in a mans psyche, or •The Animus, the masculine image in a womans psyche, •The Persona, the image we present to the world, usually protecting the Ego from negative images (like a mask), and considered another of the sub-personalities, the complexes’NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 24
    • 25. Common Archetypes Although archetypes can take on innumerable forms, there are a few particularly notable, recurring archetypal Images… • The Child •The Trickster or Fox • The Hero • The Devil or Satan • The Great Mother • The Scarecrow • The Wise Old Woman / • The Mentor Man / Animal • Rebirth • The Damsel in distress Jung also outlined what he called archetypes of transformation, which are situations, places, ways, and means that symbolise the transformation in question.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 25
    • 26. Traditional Archetypes Archetypal Character Description Examples The Hero A larger-than-life character that often goes on some kind of King Arthur, Odysseus, Luke Skywalker, journey or quest. In the course of his journey, the hero Frodo demonstrates valued qualities and abilities The Father Figure The protector and leader Mufasa from The Lion King The Mother Figure The protective nurturer and gentle provider Ma Joad in The Grapes of Wrath The Fatal Woman or A woman who uses her power (intellect, magic, or most of Circe and the Sirens in The Odyssey, Lady Temptress all, beauty) to make men, especially the Hero, weak Macbeth, Morgan le Fey The Witch A woman, often a hag (she may be disguised as a beautiful The Wicked Stepmother in fairy tales young woman), who attempts to trap and destroy the hero. Monster/Villain The antagonist, especially in opposition to the hero. The Big Bad Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood, The Giant in Jack and the Beanstalk The Innocent An inexperienced male or female character that is exposed Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, Little Red to the evils in the world Riding Hood The Alter Ego or Double Reveals the dual nature of man Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Gollum and Schmiegel Helpers : Wise Old Characters that assist or guide the protagonist Merlin, Yoda and Obi Wan Kenobi in Star Woman / Man / Animal Wars, Grandmother Willow in Pocahontas The Trickster/The Fool Characters who trick others to get them to do what s/he Puss-in-Boots, Road Runner, Fred & wants – they can be both virtuous and nefarious. George Weasley The Underdog Characters who are always in the wrong place at the The Ugly Duckling, The Frog Prince, wrong time, but who usually win something of value in the Neville Longbottom end.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 26
    • 27. Additional Archetypes http://earthvision.info/archetypes 120 Archetypes to start you off...!NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 27
    • 28. ...Some other key Jungian terms...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 28
    • 29. Individuation • Jung believed that a human being is inwardly whole, but that most of us have lost touch with important parts of our selves. • Through listening to the messages of our dreams and waking imagination, we can contact and reintegrate our different parts. • The goal of life is individuation, the process of coming to know, giving expression to, and harmonising the various components of the psyche. • If we realise our uniqueness, we can undertake a process of individuation and tap into our true self. • Each human being has a specific nature and calling which is uniquely their own, and unless these are fulfilled through a union of conscious and unconscious, the person can become sick. • Jung argued that the alchemical process was the transformation of the impure soul (lead) to perfected soul (gold), and a metaphor for the individuation process. process. Individuation = Transformation = AlchemyNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 29
    • 30. Actualisation •Archetypes seek actualisation within the context of an individuals environment and determine the degree of individuation. Jung also used the individuation. terms "evocation" and "constellation" to explain the process of actualisation. •Thus for example, the mother archetype is actualised in the mind of the child by the evoking of innate anticipations of the maternal archetype when the child is in the proximity of a maternal figure who corresponds closely enough to its archetypal template. template. •This mother archetype is built into the personal unconscious of the child as a mother complex. Complexes are functional units of the personal unconscious, in complex. the same way that archetypes are units for the collective unconscious.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 30
    • 31. Synchronicity (Meaningful coincidence) Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events that are apparently causally unrelated or unlikely to occur together by chance and that are observed to occur together in a meaningful manner. It was a principle that Jung felt gave conclusive evidence for his concepts of archetypes and the collective unconscious, in that it was descriptive of a governing dynamic that underlies the whole of human experience and history - social, emotional, psychological, and spiritual. Concurrent events that first appear to be coincidental but later turn out to be causally related are termed incoincident incoincident.NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 31
    • 32. ...Using the Tarot –The Jungian Approach... (major Arcana only)NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 32
    • 33. A Jungian view of Tarot... ...”You and I are multi-faceted people. multi- The Tarot cards mirror aspects of our personalities that require contemplation, interpretation and understanding...” (incidentally... Sigmund Freud also used the Tarot...!)NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 33
    • 34. The Playing Card Deck – The Minor ArcanaNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 34
    • 35. MBTI and the Tarot Suits (Minor Arcana) Jung’s Functional Types / Tarot Suits Myers- Myers-Briggs Type Indicator / Kiersey- Kiersey-BatesNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 35
    • 36. What the Dickens...? “...Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show...” David Copperfield – Charles Dickens Dickens’ most autobiographical work, a classic ‘coming-of-age story that traces a boy’s struggle to find his place in the world and to master his “undisciplined heart.” Dickens said: ...” I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child and his name is DAVID COPPERFIELD”...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 36
    • 37. A Fool’s Journey...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 37
    • 38. The Major ArcanaNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 38
    • 39. Qabalistic or Alchemical Approach – The 4 Stages of Life The Self Childhood Adolescence Adulthood Old AgeNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 39
    • 40. The Self A Jungian ApproachConsciousness Unconscious Collective UnconsciousNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 40
    • 41. The Fool ConsciousnessNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 41
    • 42. The Fool UnconsciousNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 42
    • 43. The Fool Collective UnconsciousNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 43
    • 44. “...Whether you shall turn out to be the hero of your own life...” ...the answer may be in the cards...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 44
    • 45. NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 45
    • 46. ...Mandalas – Expressions of the Self...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 46
    • 47. Buddhist MandalasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 47
    • 48. Aztec and Mayan MandalasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 48
    • 49. Hindu MandalasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 49
    • 50. Christian MandalasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 50
    • 51. Jungian MandalasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 51
    • 52. ...and just for Brian...NLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 52
    • 53. Nelson MandelasNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 53
    • 54. Drop me a quick e-mail if you want e- access to the Jung Dropbox mikeforte@gmail.comNLP Dorset Forum - Thursday January 26th 2012 54

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