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"The Treasure of Lemon Brown" and Elements of a Short Story
 

"The Treasure of Lemon Brown" and Elements of a Short Story

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    "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" and Elements of a Short Story "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" and Elements of a Short Story Presentation Transcript

    • When Greg Ridley wanders into an empty apartment building, he meets Lemon Brown, a homeless man who reveals that he has a treasure. What will Greg and Lemon Brown do when thieves come searching for the treasure? Cress - Lang. Arts 8
      • Born 1937 in West Virginia, but spent most of his life in Harlem, NYC.
      • Raised by foster parents, his life was happy but chaotic.
      • He grew up with a speech impediment. Writing became a habit and he acquired an early love of reading.
      • In 1954, he quit high school and joined the army.
    •  
      • Identifying the Elements of A Plot Diagram
      1 2 3 4 5
      • Plot is the organized pattern or sequence of events that make up a story. Every plot is made up of a series of incidents that are related to one another.
      • This usually occurs at the beginning of a short story. Here the characters are introduced. We also learn about the setting of the story. Most importantly, we are introduced to the main conflict (main problem).
      • This part of the story begins to develop the conflict(s). A building of interest or suspense occurs.
      • This is the turning point of the story. Usually the main character comes face to face with a conflict. The main character will change in some way.
      • All loose ends of the plot are tied up. The conflict(s) and climax are taken care of.
      • AKA “Denoeument”
      • The story comes to a reasonable ending.
    • 1. Exposition 2. Rising Action 3. Climax 4. Falling Action 5. Resolution Beginning of Story Middle of Story End of Story
      • Setting- The time and place in which the story takes place.
      • Conflict-The struggle in the story.
        • Person vs. Person… the leading character struggles against another character.
        • Person vs. Self… the leading character struggles against his or her own self.
        • Person vs, Society… the leading character struggles against a population.
        • Person vs. Nature… the leading character struggles against fate/events.
      • First person- Narrator participates in the action of the story.
      • Second person- Narrator tells the story to another character, referring to them as “you“.
      • Third person- Narrator does not participate in the action; is not one of the characters. An outside voice.
        • Limited- Narrator’s knowledge is limited to only one character, either major or minor.
        • Omniscient- Knows EVERYTHING, knows all thoughts/feelings from every character in the story.
      • Protagonist- The central character in a written piece.
      • Antagonist- Character(s) in conflict with the main character
      • Minor Character(s)- Those in the background who don’t play a major role.
      • Mood- Effect of the writer’s words on the reader.
        • “ This story made me really sad…  ”
      • Style- How the writer’s expression sets him or her apart from other writers.
        • “ O. Henry uses much bigger words than any author I’ve ever read before! Why is he so wordy?”
      • Tone- Author’s attitude toward the subject.
        • “ The author seems to suggest that we should all treat homeless people the same way the protagonist treated Lemon Brown…”