Creativity to Innovation

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Creativity to Innovation program.
People that wish to remain competitive in the today’s environment must develop their capacity to generate creative ideas and then use their talent well to transfer these ideas into innovative practices. This leads to new processes and improved methods for the best use of existing resources, and increases the ability to solve problems and implement solutions that enhance their lives and work. In addition to broadening their personal capacity for creativity and innovation, leaders are better able to implement innovative ideas into their existing practices.
http://www.create-learning.com Creativity to Innovation program at Syracuse University. People that wish to remain competitive in the today’s environment must develop their capacity to generate creative ideas and then use their talent well to transfer these ideas into innovative practices. This leads to new processes and improved methods for the best use of existing resources, and increases the ability to solve problems and implement solutions that enhance their lives and work. In addition to broadening their personal capacity for creativity and innovation, leaders are better able to implement innovative ideas into their existing practices.

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Creativity to Innovation

  1. 1. Creativity to Innovation. www.create‐learning.com
  2. 2. Draw one.www.create‐learning.com
  3. 3. If the pig is drawn . . .•Toward the top of the paper, you are a positive, optimistic person.•Toward the middle of the paper, you are a realist.•Toward the bottom of the paper, you are a pessimist and have a tendency to benegative.•Facing left, you are traditional, friendly, and good at remembering dates,including birthdays.•Facing forward (or angled forward), you are direct, enjoy playing "the devil‘sadvocate,“ and neither fear nor avoid discussions.•Facing right, you are innovative and active but do not have a strong sense offamily, and you are not good at remembering dates.•With many details, you are analytical, cautious, and distrustful.•With few details, you are emotional and naive, care little for details, and are arisk-taker.•With four legs showing, you are secure and stubborn, and you stick to yourideals.•With less than four legs, you are insecure or are going through a period ofmajor change.•With large ears, you are a good listener. The larger the ears, the better listeneryou are.•With a long tail, you have a good sex life. The longer the tail, the better it is. www.create‐learning.com
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  6. 6. Listen Instill, Internalize, ExperienceInstitutionalize Analyze Reflect the Action www.create‐learning.com
  7. 7. Inward Spiraling Doom Loops of Asphyxiation www.create‐learning.com
  8. 8. Dyadic ChallengeWord Problems Physical Problems•How many months have 28 •Compile largest press,days? vertical OR horizontal, of noodles. At the conclusion of•At what speed must a dog time at least TWO PALMSrun not the hear any sound and palms only on the twofrom a frying pan that is tied terminal ends pressing in.to its tail? •Using the seven puzzle•There are sixty lit candles in pieces, simultaneouslya room, and 10 have blown assemble five arrowheads.out. How many candles One arrow is alreadyremain? complete, and provides a size template for the remaining•If a chicken and a half can arrows. Each of the fourlay an egg and a half in a day remaining arrows will be theand a half, how long will it same size as this one. Whentake 12.5 chickens to lay you are finished, you will be37.5 eggs? able to see all five arrows at the same time. www.create‐learning.com
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  10. 10. Think about it.•How did your initial 1st thought response, differ from a more thoughtfulresponse?•What past constructs (experiences) impacted your responses?•How does working in a group change the outcomes?•How fast does that dog have to run?•In the past, when faced with challenges similar what was effective?•What can be done to ensure solutions to problems are as “true” as possibleand are able to overcome psychological inertia?DEFINITION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL INERTIA.The psychological meaning of the word "inertia" implies an indisposition to change – acertain "stuckness" due to human programming. It represents the inevitability ofbehaving in a certain way – the way that has been indelibly inscribed somewhere inthe brain. It also represents the impossibility – as long as a person is guided by hishabits – of ever behaving in a better way.http://www.triz-journal.com/archives/1998/08/c/index.htm www.create‐learning.com
  11. 11. Routine causes of psychological inertia are;•Having a fixed vision (or model) of the solution or root cause.•False assumptions (trusting the data).•Language that is a strong carrier of psychological inertia. Specificterminology carries psychological inertia.•Experience, expertise and reliance upon previous results.•Limited knowledge, hidden resources or mechanisms.•Inflexibility (model worship; trying to prove a specific theory,stubbornness).•Using the same strategy. Keep thinking the same way and you willcontinue to get the same result.•Rushing to a solution – incomplete thinking.-the 8 causes are found in TRIZICS;http://www.amazon.com/Trizics-yourself-impossible-technical-systematically/dp/1456319892/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1300803014&sr=1-1 www.create‐learning.com
  12. 12. The re-birth of slick like my gangsta stroll?Challenge:•Create an opening within your teams index card wide enough to pass ateam member through it, Without further damage to the card?•Resources – index card, scissors, knowledge of psychological inertia, eachother.•Constraint – You and your assumptions•Think – How can we maximize the surface area and use space www.create‐learning.com
  13. 13. Assumptions? www.create‐learning.com
  14. 14. www.create‐learning.com
  15. 15. Quick TRIZ: Theory of inventive problem solving. •Created in 1940 by G.S Altschuller •Initially reviewed ~200,000 patents to understand how inventive solutions are created. To date over 3 million have been reviewed and the original results have stayed essentially the same.www.create‐learning.com
  16. 16. 5 Levels of Inventiveness: Altschuller determined 5 levels with level 1 being basicand level 5 being highly innovative patents that required new technology. Levels only indicatehow difficult a problem is to solve, higher levels requiring more knowledge from outsidesources; truly outside-the-box.Trials = estimation of the number of trials it may take to obtain a solution using trail and error.Level 1 = 32% of patents; Less than 10 trials.•Example: Narrow hull the ship is unstable. Solution: use a wider hull. Level 1 does not changethe system substantially.Level 2 = 45% of patents; up to 100 trials.•Not well known within the industry or technology. No need from knowledge outside of theindustry and requires creative thinking for the solution.Level 3 = 18% of patents; up to 1000 trials.•Significant improvements are made to an existing system. The solution requires usingengineering knowledge from other industries and technology.•Example: An electric field is used to move boxes rather than rollers. Contradiction: If I pushthe boxes, then they move but the boxes wear out. Solution: magnetic levitation.Level 4 = 4% of patents; up to 10,000 trials.•Solution uses science that is new to that industry or technology. Usually involves a radical newprinciple of operation.•Example: A sniper needs a bigger and bigger lens to accurately hit his target. Solution: use alaser sight to provide accurate location.Level 5 = Less than 1%; over 10 million trials.•Solutions involve discoveries of new scientific phenomena or a new scientific discovery. www.create‐learning.com
  17. 17. Rope Cuffs? Nail Balance? Which level are these?www.create‐learning.com
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  19. 19. Non-TRIZ specific Problem Solving ModelsPlan:Do:Check:Act model originally credited to Shewhart www.create‐learning.com
  20. 20. Plan:Do:Check:Act model originally credited to Shewhart5 Questions;1.What is the target condition? (the challenge)2.What is the actual condition now?3.What obstacles are now preventing you from reaching your target condition?Which one are you addressing now?4.What is your next step?5.When can we go and see what we have learned from taking that step? www.create‐learning.com
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  23. 23. •What’s your •What is working forproblem? you?•What do you want •What else?to do? •What is one thing•What do you now you can do in thehave available you next 90 minutes?did not have before? •When can we go & check? www.create‐learning.com
  24. 24. mike@create-learning.com www.create-learning.com www.facebook.com/teambuildingwny Twitter: @teambuildingny 716 629 3678www.create‐learning.com
  25. 25. Photo AttributionsAnsikmichaelcardusAbulic MonkeyMagnusfranklinhttp://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos‐ak‐snc1/v1397/172/6/40002763702/n40002763702_1069610_4906.jpg?dl=1FaceMePLSElaphurusContent Resources:TRIZICS: Teach yourself TRIZ, how to invent, innovate an solve “impossible” technical problems systematically;  Cameron, GordonCreate Space 2010 www.create‐learning.com

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