<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 1 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND
Introduction
Every schoo...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 2 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

organize accrediting agencies and that a federation of accreditat...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 3 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

These two impalpable dimensions in a school should be given utmos...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 4 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

guiding the students’ self-realization through the development of...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 5 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

In addition, the institution should have several comprehensive,
a...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 6 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

2 years
Formal Survey

Level II
Initial Accreditation Status

3 y...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 7 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

interaction among people. In the context of an organization, huma...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 8 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

efficiency and productivity. It is believed that organizations ar...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 9 -

GRADUATE SCHOOL

Administrative measures for Effective Instruction. The process bo...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 10 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Figure 1
RESEARCH PARADIGM
INPUT

PROCESS

Documents
Exhibits und...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 11 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Statement of the Problem
The study sought to identify The Level o...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 12 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Significance of the Study
The study is perceived to be of signifi...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 13 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Future Researchers. The study may serve as a frame of reference f...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 14 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Academic Performance. This refers to the performance made by the
...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 15 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Institutions to ensure that they are follow the established stand...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 16 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Fringe benefits. This refers to an employee’s personal benefits r...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 17 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Program of Studies. It is a plan of education with clear cut acad...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 18 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Chapter 2
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE
AND STUDIES
This chapter i...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 19 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Katz4 identified administrative and supervisory skills as concept...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 20 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

participation of social, civic and cultural activities and cooper...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 21 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Salary and Benefit administration is the function of the
personne...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 22 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Moorehead and Griffin9 suggest at least 12 key ingredients that w...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 23 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

growth opportunities, offering financial assistance, and
providin...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 24 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

foresight, knowledge of human conduct beyond mere book knowledge ...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 25 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Involvement to Occupational Needs, Needs Satisfaction, Locus of C...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 26 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Local:
Paranete17 pointed out in her study that there are four ar...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 27 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Stressed by teachers was the need for minimization of stress
whic...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 28 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

The study of Santos is similar with the present study which dwelt...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 29 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

training needs of the employees of Mallig Plains Colleges. Noneth...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 30 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

school officials in Davao City. While the present study unearthed...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 31 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

and its affect to performance while the present study focused on ...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 32 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

available. The researcher opines that since his study dealt on id...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 33 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Expected
Average

Transmutation
Rating

5.0
4.9
4.8
4.7
4.6
4.5
4...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 34 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

the ratings assigned by the respondents. The use of rubrics, some...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 35 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

standards set by CHED and PACUCOA served as benchmarks or referen...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 36 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

4. Selection of
faculty members

5. Ranking
Promo...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 37 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

Accreditation
Minimum
Standards

CHED Minimum
Sta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 38 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

CHED Minimum
Standards

Accreditation
Minimum Sta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 39 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

CHED Minimum
Standards

Accreditation
Minimum Sta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 40 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

2. Instructional
Procedures

3. Classroom
Managem...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 41 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

CHED Minimum
Standards

Accreditation
Minimum Sta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 42 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Area/Sub-Areas

CHED Minimum
Standards

Accreditation
Minimum Sta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 43 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
OF DATA
This chapter pr...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 44 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Degree of Implementation of the Policy on Recruitment for Faculty...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 45 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Graduate Degree is Satisfactory
Academic Qualification
Sub
sectio...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 46 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Graduate Degree Courses

Actual Number
of Faculty
Members

Qualif...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 47 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Academic Qualification
Sub
section

Program
Alternative

Expected...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 48 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

school. Due to the verticalization of CHED, only two out of 19 or...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 49 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Actual Number of
Faculty Members

Faculty with at
least 3 years o...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 50 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 5
Faculty Members Assigned to Practicum Courses Have at L...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 51 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 5 shows the percentage of Faculty members teaching practicu...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 52 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Frequency Distribution of the Faculty Members Equipped with
Knowl...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 53 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 7
Faculty Members Endeavor to Implement the Purposes and ...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 54 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 7
Frequency Distribution of Teachers who Include Vision, Mi...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 55 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Professional Performance
Sub
section

Program
Alternative

Expect...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 56 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

have student book reports compilation. There are no book reports
...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 57 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 9
Frequency Distribution of Teachers who were Observed
by t...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 58 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 10
“Show Evidence of Preparedness for Classes”
Profession...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 59 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 10 shows the percentage of Faculty members with notes on da...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 60 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 11
Frequency Distribution of Faculty Members who are Aware ...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 61 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

RUBRICS 12
Evidence of Effective Use of Library, Internet, Instru...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 62 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 12 shows the percentage of faculty members with logbook for...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 63 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Compiled
Action Researche...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 64 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 14
“A Policy of Determining Teaching Assignments is
Adopt...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 65 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

have a maximum load; zero out of seven teachers or zero percent i...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 66 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Actual Number
of faculty

Full Time Faculty
Instructors

Percenta...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 67 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 16
“Faculty Members are Given Teaching Assignment Only
In...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 68 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 16 shows the breakdown of faculty members who teach their l...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 69 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 17
Frequency Distribution of Teachers with No
3 Consecutive...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 70 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 18
“The Quality of Teacher Performance is Considered
When...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 71 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 18 shows the percentage of faculty members with satisfactor...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 72 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Frequency Distribution of Teachers with
Extra Class Assignment
Nu...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 73 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

“Student-Faculty Ratio is Generally Satisfactory”
Teaching Assign...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 74 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 20 shows the percentage of classes with 40 students and bel...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 75 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 21
The Criteria for Promotion in Rank and Salary
DEPARTMENT...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 76 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 22
“In the Application of the Criteria, the Recommendatio...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 77 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 22 shows that only College administrators have a say on the...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 78 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Frequency Distribution of Teachers Receiving
Above Minimum Wage

...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 79 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

“The Benefits and Responsibility of Tenure are Clearly
Described ...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 80 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

seven teachers or 85.71 percent in the Elementary, eight out of 1...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 81 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 25 shows that 12 out of 13 or 92.31 percent of the policies...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 82 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Table 26
The Policies on Fringe Benefits Enjoyed by the Faculty

...
<<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 83 - GRADUATE SCHOOL

Rubrics 27
“The Faculty Development Program of the College Gives ...
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Thesis final copy

  1. 1. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 1 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Chapter 1 THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction Every school dreams to be transformed with a better atmosphere which will open its gate to learners who will soon be the leaders of change. The learners will spearhead innovations into different fields of endeavor. The educational setting in our country today seems like a zooming jet in the sky that keeps on accelerating until it reaches its maximum speed. The educational struggle of every learner becomes even more complex this time because of the standards set by different accrediting agencies in pursuit of quality education which will serve as the gatepass of learners in creating a formidable image towards global competitiveness. Accreditation is the formal recognition of an educational program that possesses high level of quality or excellence based on the analysis of the merits of its educational operations in attaining its objectives and its role in the community that it serves. In 1970, The Presidential Commission to Survey Philippine Education (PCSPE) submitted the policy recommendation to improve and strengthen higher education. One of the recommendations encourages schools to join or 2008 1 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  2. 2. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 2 - GRADUATE SCHOOL organize accrediting agencies and that a federation of accreditation agencies be established. This recommendation was referred to as the Integrated Reorganization Plan (IRP). Presidential Decree No. 1 approved and adopted the IRP. Presidential Decree No. 1 and PD No. 1200 (NEDA Five-Year Plan) both provided that the accreditation program shall be one of the strategies to achieve educational and manpower development goals1. Different colleges in the country exert a lot of efforts to be able to acquire an accreditation status. Undergoing the process requires a lot of undertakings since there are guidelines and indicators to be complied with to quality accreditation. The nine areas identified as the qualifying criteria for accreditation are: Purposes and Objectives, Faculty, Instruction, Library, Laboratories, Physical Plant and Facilities, Student-Personnel Services, Social Orientation and Community Involvement and Organization and Administration. These are set by the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (PACUCOA). Faculty and Instruction are definitely the key factors in achieving quality education, obviously since the two factors speak of the performance and qualifications of teachers and the quality of instruction given by them. 1 Manual of Accreditation, Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation. 2008 2 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  3. 3. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 3 - GRADUATE SCHOOL These two impalpable dimensions in a school should be given utmost regard because the academic reputation of the institution depends on them. Faculty, as one of the major concerns in the academe, makes the school function. In every organization, human resources come first as a priority, precisely because if there are no teachers in the school, there would be no stewards of learning who transform learners into responsible citizens. An individual who works for an organization or institution is normally evaluated by his superior on the basis of at least four phases. These four phases are effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and character. If the job performance of an individual is rated high in any one or all of the four dimensions, the institution is expected to recognize the individual by means of either intrinsic or extrinsic rewards, or both. Instruction, on the other hand, is the instrument for metamorphosis of the teachers. In simple language, it speaks of the effectiveness of both the administrators and faculty members. Definitely, when the teachers desire to uplift the performance of the students, they should be aware of the tools that contribute to quality of instruction. This will motivate the learners in their pursuit of excellence. Instruction plays a vital role with regards to instructional competence of teachers. The methods used in teaching are employed with a view of 2008 3 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  4. 4. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 4 - GRADUATE SCHOOL guiding the students’ self-realization through the development of their analytical and critical thinking. These methods are adapted to subject matters, situational needs and individual differences. A variety of instructional procedures are to be expected too, such as lecture, team teaching and group dynamics. The school should make use of a number of teaching devices such as audio-visual aids and modern information and communications technology to cope with highly sophisticated gadgets. 2 With a certificate of appreciation awarded by PACU, Mallig Plains Colleges was recently dubbed as the Most Improved College in Cagayan Valley. Like any other institution, it carries and promotes its philosophy, mission, vision, objectives and core values. Mallig Plains Colleges is proud of its existence and envisions continuing its delivery of quality education to its learners. The administration, faculty and staff exert more effort to come up with a worthy aspiration—to be a center of academic excellence in Region 2 and in the country at large. MPC has 59 teaching personnel. This covers the basic education teachers, instructors and professors. Expectedly it should have a pool of competent teachers, not to mention, with talents and skills. 2 Rubelyn Lizardo, ‘The Instructional Competencies (Unpublished Master’s Thesis, MPC, Isabela, March 2000). 2008 of Teachers in WIPC,” 4 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  5. 5. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 5 - GRADUATE SCHOOL In addition, the institution should have several comprehensive, accurate and up-to-date instructional materials present in the school to give platforms to the students to foray into a well designed and sound education process. It is for this reason that the researcher has embarked on an assessment of the Faculty and Instruction readiness of Mallig Plains Colleges towards Accreditation. Identifying the criteria and indicators would be an initial step to decipher the actual standing of two areas in relation to accreditation. The findings will be beneficial for administrators and faculty members since these will be an immense reference point in discovering the strengths and weaknesses of both faculty and instruction. If these will emerge as the good points for accreditation, then the institution as a whole shall cherish and continue questing for excellence. The illustration below is the sequential process of the different phases of accreditation considering the different stages and the actions to be taken. ACCREDITATION STATUS FLOW CHART FOR HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS Preliminary Survey 2008 Level I Applicant Status 5 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  6. 6. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 6 - GRADUATE SCHOOL 2 years Formal Survey Level II Initial Accreditation Status 3 years 1st Re-survey Level II Re-accredited Status 5 years “Clean Accreditation” plus additional criteria set by CHED/FAAP* 2nd Re-survey Level III Re-accredited Status Level III Re-accredited Status 5 years “Clean Accreditation” plus additional criteria set by CHED/FAAP* 3rd Re-survey 5 years “Clean Accreditation” plus additional criteria set Conceptual Framework by CHED/FAAP* Level III Re-accredited Status Level IV Re-accredited Status Conceptual Framework The existence of the framework in which this study was based lie on the concept of human relations. It is said that human relations is simply an 2008 6 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  7. 7. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 7 - GRADUATE SCHOOL interaction among people. In the context of an organization, human relation is the interaction among employers and their employees, and employees among co-workers, and in most cases among clients. The relationship maybe among individuals, among groups or in organization at large. Lussier 3 opines that the goal of human relations is to create a “win-win” situation by satisfying employee needs while achieving organizational objectives. A win-win situation according to Lussier, occurs when the organization and employees get what they want. In some instances, Labor group sometimes express their grievances because they feel and observe that organizations exploit their employees, and that they are often perceived to be profit-focused. In this case, the organization wins and employees lose. In other situations, employees go slowly on their productivity because of the organizations rigidity or stringent policies. This particular event causes the employees to win, and a loss for the organization. In the context of this study therefore, an organization is expected to exercise fair treatment and practices. A win-win situation is a state whereby harmonious and smooth interpersonal relationship is central to the organization’s management principles. Being aware of what an employee needs, and providing these needs will motivate the workers to work with Robert N. Lussier, Human Relations: A Skills Building Approach, 2nd ed. (U.S.A: Irwing Publishing, Co;,1989.), pp. 4-7. 3 2008 7 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  8. 8. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 8 - GRADUATE SCHOOL efficiency and productivity. It is believed that organizations are responsible for the behavior of its employees. Success, peace and goodwill inside and within the organization will depend on the human relations exhibited inside the organization. In the light of this undertaking, the researcher intended to scrutinize the real stand of faculty and instruction in response to the standards set by PACUCOA. It helped the researcher determine the extent to which these needs are wanted. Awareness of the real stand of Faculty and Instruction will allow the administration to formulate programs that will contribute to their career growth and development. Figure 1 presents the paradigm of the study. The paradigm uses the inputprocess-output in a vertical manner to clearly understand the interconnectivity of each factor and variable. The input box includes the documents and exhibits under Faculty and Instruction in response to the standards set by PACUCOA. The faculty area includes the Academic Qualifications, Professional Performance, Teaching Assignment, Rank, Tenure and Remuneration and Fringe Benefits and Faculty Development. Instruction, on the other hand, speaks on Program for Studies, Co-curricular Activities, Instructional Process, Academic Performance of Students and 2008 8 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  9. 9. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 9 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Administrative measures for Effective Instruction. The process box contains the Comparative Analysis of the Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges vis-a-vis the Criteria set by PACUCOA. The output expects an objective assessment of the level of readiness of Faculty and Instruction for Accreditation. 2008 9 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  10. 10. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 10 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Figure 1 RESEARCH PARADIGM INPUT PROCESS Documents Exhibits under Faculty and Instruction in response to the standards set by PACUCOA Rating of the following areas based on rubrics Faculty Academic qualifications Professional Performance Teaching Assignment Rank, Tenure and Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Faculty Development Instruction Program for Studies Co-curricular activities Instructional Process Classroom Management Academic Performance of Students Administrative Measures for Effective Instruction OUTPUT Analysis of the Status of the Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges An Objective Assessment of the Level of Readiness of Vis-a-vis Faculty and Criteria set by PACUCOA Instruction for Accreditation FEEDBACK MECHANISM 2008 10 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  11. 11. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 11 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Statement of the Problem The study sought to identify The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation. Specifically, it addressed issues that concern: 1. Faculty a. Academic qualifications b. Professional Performance c. Teaching Assignment d. Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits e. Faculty Development 2. Instruction a. Program of Studies b. Co-curricular Activities c. Instructional Process d. Classroom management e. Academic Performance of Students f. Administrative Measures for Effective Instruction 2008 11 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  12. 12. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 12 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Significance of the Study The study is perceived to be of significance and relevance to the following: Policy-Making Body/School Administrators. Through the study, the school administrators will be able to identify the level of readiness of faculty and instruction. The result of this study will help the administrators to develop ideas to improve skills of staff for better performance. Faculty. With the findings of this study, the faculty members will be guided with the most comprehensive and accurate methods, techniques, styles and approaches to use in the teaching-learning process. Students. The students through the result of this study will be provided with the best instruction to become well guided learners in their psychomotor, affective and cognitive phases. Researcher. The researcher being a member of the Mallig Plains Colleges Family maybe able to identify the level of readiness of faculty and instruction and therefore be able to address issues in a proper manner. Furthermore, he may be able to suggest ways to improve the deficiencies of the employees and further assist them to develop their strengths in order to provide quality performance in their respective fields. 2008 12 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  13. 13. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 13 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Future Researchers. The study may serve as a frame of reference for researchers who would like to dwell on investigating similar institutional situations in the academic field. Scope and Delimitation The study focused mainly on the level of readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges towards Accreditation. This included an analytical assessment of some factors that affect Faculty, such as: Academic Qualifications, Professional Performance, Teaching Assignments, Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits and Faculty Development. Instruction analysis covered different factors such as: Program of Studies, Co-curricular Activities, Instructional Process, Classroom Management, Academic Performance of Students and Administrative Measures for Effective Instruction. Definition of Terms The terms used in this study are operationally defined for better understanding of the study by the readers. Academic Qualification. This refers to the highest degree obtained by the faculty members. 2008 13 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  14. 14. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 14 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Academic Performance. This refers to the performance made by the faculty members based on the standards set by Institutional Committee on performance appraisal. Academic Rank. This specifies the designation of the faculty member as Professor I,II, III, IV and V, Associate Professor I, II, III, IV and V, Assistant Professor I, II, III, IV and V and Instructor I, II and III in the tertiary level. For basic education, this specifies whether one is a Senior Teacher I, II and III and Junior Teacher I, II and III. Accreditation. It is a process towards achieving formal recognition of an educational program as possessing high level of quality or excellence based on the analysis of the merits of its educational operations in attaining its objectives and its role in the community that it serves by an accrediting authority. Administrators. These are school authorities who take care of the implementation of an institution’s standards. Character. It pertains to the teacher’s attitude, behavior and values. Commission on Higher Education (CHED). This is a governmentcreated educational agency which monitors and supervises Higher Education 2008 14 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  15. 15. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 15 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Institutions to ensure that they are follow the established standards of Philippine Higher Education Institutions (PHEI’s). Classroom Management. This pertains to the proper administration and management of classroom activities by the faculty members in holding their classes. Competence. This refers to someone’s capabilities, skills, abilities and aptitude for any undertaking. Co-Curricular Activities. These are activities related to different subjects. These are considered supplementary to learning because these provide avenues for the learners to be exposed in response with the application of the theories and principles discussed by teachers. Effectiveness. A term for accomplishing work in an earlier expected time with minimal flaws. Efficiency. It as a term for finishing work with an outstanding output and in an earlier possible time. Faculty. This refers to the professionally-trained and licensed persons who are teaching academic subjects in a school. Faculty Development. This pertains to the activities planned and implemented by the school administration for the upgrading and acceleration of the faculty members towards quality academic performance. 2008 15 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  16. 16. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 16 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Fringe benefits. This refers to an employee’s personal benefits received in addition to wage or salary. Instructional Process. This pertains to the entire methodology used in imparting instruction which are employed with a view to guiding the student’s self-realization through the development of the students’ analytical and critical judgment. Instruction. A process of emphasizing a mission to provide leadership, service and support for the development and implementation of a researchbased curriculum to ensure that all learners achieve at high levels. Management. It is partly an art and partly a science. This recognizes the innovative, intuitive and subjective skills that lead towards success of every endeavor taken. PACUCOA. Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities – Commission on Accreditation. It is an agency which assesses an institution’s performance using a set of standards and requirements. Productivity. It pertains to someone’s efficiency, effectiveness and proficiency. Professional Performance. It refers to performance revealed by the faculty in administering and holding classes and addressing the problems that exist. 2008 16 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  17. 17. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 17 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Program of Studies. It is a plan of education with clear cut academic goals for regional and national development and for practical experience directly related to the professional role for which the students are being prepared. Readiness. It refers to the numerical score that MPC must have in response to the standards set by PACUCOA. MPC must have a rating of 90% in order to achieve level 1 status, based on the standardized transmutation table of average and rating. Remuneration. It pertains to the pay for service rendered. Rubrics. A measuring tool with empirical basis. It is made more credible to rate a certain endeavor since every action has a counterpart based on a designed scale and range. Teaching Assignment. This presents the matrix of subjects to be taught by the faculty members. Tenure. The time frame or period where a certain employee has rendered service. Training. It refers to the seminars, conferences and workshops attended by faculty members to increase professional efficiencies and skills. 2008 17 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  18. 18. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 18 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Chapter 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES This chapter includes summaries and cited works from both local and foreign researches on Instructional Competencies of teachers. The researcher perceived the findings of various authors appropriate and relevant in the study about the Faculty and Instruction findings in response to the standards set by PACUCOA. Related Literature Foreign: One of the most important and necessary factors in the academic system is the human resource. For this, it is the duty of the administration to hire qualified and competent faculty who will spearhead effective learning transmission. 2008 18 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  19. 19. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 19 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Katz4 identified administrative and supervisory skills as conceptual, technical, and human skills in order to carry out effectively the duties and responsibility of a principal. These skills are further described by Hersey and Blanchard5 as follows: Technical skill is the ability to use knowledge, methods, techniques and equipments necessary for the performance of specific tasks acquired from experience education and training. Human skills, on the other hand, are the ability and judgment in working with and through people including an understanding of motivation and an application of effective leadership. The ability to understand the complexities of the over-all organization is referred to as conceptual skills. This knowledge permits one to act according to the objectives of the total organization rather than only on the basis of the goals and needs of one’s immediate group. The conceptual skills include the setting of goals, objectives and targets of the school, development of organization, coordinating and integrating all the organizational interests and activities of the school, solving problems at the shortest possible time, recognizing and analyzing school problems, Robert L. Katz, “Skills of an Effective Administrator,” Harvard Business Review, Vol. 33, No. 1(Jan-Feb. 1995), pp. 34-42. 4 Hersey and Blanchard K., Management of Organization Behavior, 2nd edition (New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.), p. 19. 5 2008 19 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  20. 20. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 20 - GRADUATE SCHOOL participation of social, civic and cultural activities and cooperation in the implementation. Lawler6 explains that employees prefer offices, which have suitable working conditions such as good heating, illumination, ventilation and isolation. At the same time, the implication of salary on job satisfaction had been proved. However, the employee should believe that he deserves the pay for job satisfaction based on salary. He also emphasized that high degree of job satisfaction is related to colleagues. He stated that: “harmony, in small working teams increases job satisfaction but incompatible employees cause dissatisfaction at the office.” Mc Gehee and Thayer7 defined training as the formal procedure which a company utilizes to facilitate learning so that the resultant behavior contributes to the attainment of the company’s goals and objectives. The definition implies that training is only one of the tools used by management to enhance organizational efficiency. There are various human resource functions which are utilized by organizations to be productive and effective. They are as follows: 1. Salary and Benefit Administration Lawler, E.E. A http//www.pdffactory.com 6 Journal on Pay: An Organization Development. W. Mc Gehee and P.W. Thayer, Training in Business and Industry (New York: J. Wiley and Sons). 7 2008 20 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  21. 21. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 21 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Salary and Benefit administration is the function of the personnel involved in seeing to it that employees are compensated fairly and they are receiving the wages and other benefits intended to motivate and maintain them. A training program like orientation or induction program is the best avenue where newly-hired employees are told of their basic salary, the probability of overtime and its corresponding pay, and fringe benefits that the company gives to its employees. 2. Employees discipline. Training programs which are involved in the development of positive attitude towards self, others and work lessen disciplinary problems among the employees. Abella8 on the other hand defines training needs analysis as the process of finding out about the people to be trained and the type of training they need. He further adds that training needs analysis also provides the information one need in order to decide on the objectives, content and format of a training program. K.T. Abella, Building Successful Training Program: Step by Step Guide (New York: Addison-Wesley) 8 2008 21 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  22. 22. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 22 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Moorehead and Griffin9 suggest at least 12 key ingredients that would give an organization a well planned career management program. These are: 1. Top Management support 2. Activities with other human resource activities 3. Involvement of supervisors 4. Use of human resource managers as consultant 5. Periodic skill assessment 6. Realistic feedback about career programs 7. Equal access and open enrolment 8. Focus on psychological success rather than advancement 9. Flexibility for individual needs 10. Climate setting for career development 11. Small pilot programs 12. Periodic program assessment To quote Robbins10 opinion, he said that “The essence of a progressive career development program is built on providing support for employees to continually add their skills, abilities, and knowledge. This support includes clearly communicating the organization’s goals and future strategies, creating 9 Ibid., p. 593. 10 Robbins, Loc.cit. 2008 22 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  23. 23. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 23 - GRADUATE SCHOOL growth opportunities, offering financial assistance, and providing the time for employees to learn.” Local: While the preceding text handled occupational needs and training needs in the context of foreign point of view, the following discussions focus purely on the Philippine setting. The need for conceptual, technical, and human relations skills or professional improvement of the principals has been recognized by the principals themselves as pointed out in the following observations: 11 The principal, like any other position in the teaching service, is a developing position. However, no matter how adequate the preparation of a principal is, he will find it necessary to improve professionally after being appointed to the job. Problems and issues will continue to crop up and proper solution for such can be attained through study and constant consultation with his peers as well as with teachers and other school officials. According to Villamar,12 the fundamental qualities of an efficient educational manager are intelligence, honesty, industry, courage, unusual 11 A Hand Book for Philippine Public Elementary School Principals, 1968, pp.119-120. Fortunata C. Villamar, “The Role of an Educational Management”, The Modern teacher, XXVI: 8(November, 1970), pp.291-293. 12 2008 23 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  24. 24. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 24 - GRADUATE SCHOOL foresight, knowledge of human conduct beyond mere book knowledge and a good attitude toward work. Sison13 stated that, the study of the training needs is the first prerequisite in establishing a systematic training program. He further states that the immediate and specific need of a company is the determining factor in the selection of the training courses and materials. Related Studies Foreign: Riipinen14 findings in his study entitled “The Relation of Work P.S. Sison, Personnel and Human Resource Management, 6th Edition (Manila; Rex Book Store). 13 M. Riipinen, The Relation of Work Involvement to Occupational needs, Need Satisfaction, Locus of Control and Affect (Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland) http//www.ericdigest.com (ud43194210). 14 2008 24 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  25. 25. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 25 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Involvement to Occupational Needs, Needs Satisfaction, Locus of Control and Affect” states that “Work involvement was generally independent of need satisfaction, although both negative and positive correlation with need satisfaction were found, depending upon occupational group and sex. Basini and Buckley15 found out that from the 259 respondent voluntary organizations compared with private sector populations, indicate significant differences in employees work value, reward expectations and job involvement in their study entitled employee needs and expectations in the Irish voluntary sector. Venables and Allender16 in their study on the occupational health needs of universities enumerated 15 trainings needed. These are: accounting skills, communication skills, writing skills, career development, conflict management, customer service, leadership, financial skills, interview skills, stress management, supervisory skills, report writing, team building, time management and work place safety. Serge Basini and Finian Buckley, Employee Needs and Expectations in the Irish Voluntary sector. Email(basini@dcu.ic), and Email (Buckley@dcu.ic) 15 K.M. Venables and S. Allender, Occupational Health Needs of Universities (A Review with an Emphasis on the United Kingdom. University of Oxford, UK.). 16 2008 25 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  26. 26. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 26 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Local: Paranete17 pointed out in her study that there are four areas of possible training needs to be considered namely: professional competence, professional growth, personal-social growth and personal development which include physical end spiritual aspects. The perceptions of respondents on the training needs for teachers were determined in the four areas.18 a. Personal Competence In the study, there is a need to emphasize the development of instructional materials, especially since there is much use for such materials that will appeal and interest the child learner. b. Professional growth There were, however, four important training needs that were noted which include: need to attend seminars, conferences for professional growth, observe class demonstrations, update knowledge and skills in teaching, adopting new trends in education. c. Personal Development Carmen L. Paranete, “Training Needs-Based Teacher Development program for Muntinlupa 1,” (Unpublished Masters Thesis, Philippine Christian University, Manila, 1980). 17 18 2008 Ibid. 26 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  27. 27. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 27 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Stressed by teachers was the need for minimization of stress which will in fact deal with the concept of stress management due to the stress subjected on people because of the nature of their work. d. Personal-Social growth Another training need isolated based on their perception was to have understanding of one’s personality. In a similar study made by Santos,19 she made the following conclusions: The principals perceived that most important training are on planning and introducing educational innovations, special programs and project, good setting, development of organizational action or work plan, understanding proficiency in the process, procedure and methods in improving teaching-learning situations: possession of good working relationship among personnel and community service. Santos20 further concluded that the principal with low educational background showed higher percentage of training needs than those with higher educational attainment. Rosita C. Santos, “The Training Needs of Public Elementary School Principals in Pililla-Jala Jala: Their Implications to their Training Development Program,” (Unpublished Masters Thesis, Central Colleges of the Philippines, Manila, May 1989). 19 20 2008 Ibid. 27 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  28. 28. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 28 - GRADUATE SCHOOL The study of Santos is similar with the present study which dwelt also on the training needs of elementary school principals. Both studies focused on identifying training needs as bases for coming up with a program and training to address the identified needs. However, the Santos study involved only school administrators, teaching and non-teaching personnel down to utility workers. In terms of settings, though both are educational institutions, Santos’ is public while the locale of the present study is a private school. Malabanan21 in her research found out that of the 13 skills listed in her questionnaire under technical, the skills found to be developed further or strengthened for head teachers were: Guiding teachers in innovative techniques and procedures of teaching subjects and co-curricular activities, developing entrepreneurial skills among pupils and providing opportunities to learn, earn and invest. Planning and conducting in service training of teachers and non-teaching personnel were also included and conducting research aimed at improving quality instruction. The study of Malabanan runs parallel with the present study. She investigated the training needs of elementary school principals and school heads. In like manner, the present study also considered the in-service Remedios B. Malabanan, “The In-Service Training Needs of Elementary Schools Principals and Head Teachers in the Division of Cavite City S.Y. 1994-1995,” (Unpublished Masters Thesis, Republican College, Quezon City, Oct. 1994). 21 2008 28 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  29. 29. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 29 - GRADUATE SCHOOL training needs of the employees of Mallig Plains Colleges. Nonetheless, the study differ in terms of respondents. Malabanan considered public elementary school administrators while the respondents of the presently conducted study considered all the employees of the school under study. Ollosa22 divided his topic into two categories and his findings are the following: for the internal needs, he enumerated sense of duty, love of work, self-realization and fulfillment and recognition of accomplishments were frequent and powerful motivators of efficient work performance to elementary grades teachers; and to school officials, the desire for promotion, fear of failure and fair disciplinary action. On external needs, he found out that belonging and acceptance by the school, job security, working facilities, community support for education, salary increase and interpersonal relations with co-workers were frequent stimulators of efficient job accomplishment to elementary grades teachers than the kind of leadership.23 The study of Ollosa was centered upon the factors that motivate efficient work performance among public elementary grades teachers and 22 Cesar B. Ollosa, “A Study of the Factors That Motivate Efficient Work Performance of Public Elementary Grades Teachers and School Officials of Buhangin District, Davao City,”(Unpublished Masters Thesis, Ateneo de Davao University, 1980). 23 Ibid. 2008 29 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  30. 30. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 30 - GRADUATE SCHOOL school officials in Davao City. While the present study unearthed the occupational needs of employees of Mallig Plains Colleges, Mallig, Isabela; the researcher saw a vein of similarity as his study is also anchored on the motivational needs of employees. In June 1980, Flores24 conducted a study on teacher’s morale and she made the following conclusions; high morale is an indicator of favorable condition that would lend to satisfaction of work. A teacher generally is influenced by the conditions prevailing in the environment where she performs her work. In like manner, she maintained that teacher salary play an important role in teachers attitude toward the service. There is dissatisfaction among rural teachers with regard to inadequate salary and teaching overload. She also included that more experienced teachers exhibit high morale possibly because of the administrators’ ability to recognize and utilize their special talents thus giving them a sense of leadership. On the same plane, there lies the present study and of Flores since both dwell on factors affecting employees’ performance. It was the concern of both researchers to address needs of employees to improve their performance. The study of Flores identified the level of morale of teachers Corazon K. Flores, “Teachers Morale in the Division Of Cotabato, Malybalay Bukidnon,” (Unpublished Masters Thesis, Bukidnon State University, Bukidnon, June, 1980). 24 2008 30 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  31. 31. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 31 - GRADUATE SCHOOL and its affect to performance while the present study focused on the faculty and instruction readiness. Chapter 3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND PROCEDURE This chapter presents the methodology used in the study. It includes the discussion of the following: Research design, data gathering, procedure, instruments to be used in the analyses of the data. Research Design The documentary analysis was used in the study. It deals on documentary process which is rubrics-based against the documents that are 2008 31 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  32. 32. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 32 - GRADUATE SCHOOL available. The researcher opines that since his study dealt on identifying and describing the readiness of faculty and instruction towards accreditation, this is the most fitting research design to bring out the real state of faculty and instruction in the institution as key areas in PACUCOA accreditation standards to be addressed. Data Gathering Instruments The study was designed to assess the readiness of faculty and instruction towards accreditation using rubrics supported by documents which are available at the accreditation room. The rubrics used were rated 0-5 with corresponding indicators depending upon their existence and functionality in response to the factors concerning faculty and instruction. After scrutinizing the corresponding mean of each rubric, they were added to come up with the mean of every category in each area. The computed mean of each category were totaled to come up with the general average of a certain area. After the averages of faculty and instruction had been determined, the standardized transmutation table served as the reference point in assessing whether an area is qualified for a Level 1, 2 or 3 status. Below is the table which presents the expected average for each area with corresponding percentage. 2008 32 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  33. 33. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 33 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Expected Average Transmutation Rating 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 Remarks The expected rating for PACUCOA LEVEL III STATUS The expected rating for PACUCOA LEVEL II STATUS The expected rating for PACUCOA LEVEL I STATUS Specifically, the rubrics were designed to suit the analytical evaluation form for the self-survey by the PACUCOA. Rating in each rubric was made vis-à-vis the numerical evaluation set by the standard. Since the PACU-COA instruments are more of checklists, there are no objective indicators that would qualify the ratings pre determined by the accrediting agency. The checklists include some statements describing the ratings but are perceived as not objective enough to prove the reliability of 2008 33 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  34. 34. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 34 - GRADUATE SCHOOL the ratings assigned by the respondents. The use of rubrics, somehow lessened if not totally eliminated subjectivity. The presence of a document is not enough evidence of the functionality of a program requirement. With the use of rubrics, the researcher was able to explicitly narrow down the biases that the respondents accrued in their ratings. Data Gathering Procedure The researcher sought the permission of the President of Mallig Plains Colleges to conduct the study and to use the accomplished documents available in the accreditation room. After permission was granted, the researcher consulted with the Dean of the Graduate Studies for her suggestions and insights. After such, the researcher approached the Research Director to request for the available documents needed in this study. The researcher identified the appropriate indicators which served as bases to identify the objective evidences to support the PACUCOA standards. Data Analysis Procedure The data gathered was first organized by the researcher according to the requirements set by PACUCOA together with the available documents in the accreditation room. Assessment of documents followed. The following 2008 34 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  35. 35. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 35 - GRADUATE SCHOOL standards set by CHED and PACUCOA served as benchmarks or references to determine the level of readiness of Faculty and Instruction areas of MPC towards Accreditation. MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION Area/Sub-Areas CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents FACULTY 1. Academic Qualifications 25% of undergraduate subjects should be taught by faculty with appropriate Masters and/or Law degrees 2. Teaching Load Maximum teaching load of 30 units/hrs per week 3. ]Educational/ Professional Experience and Length of Service 2008 30% with MA degree • Maximum teaching load of 24 units hrs/week • Assignment should be in one’s field of study or specialization No minimum • 3 years of college standard specified teaching • 3 years of successful practice in one’s profession 35 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  36. 36. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 36 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas 4. Selection of faculty members 5. Ranking Promotion CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents • Cooperative No minimum selection process standard specified • Clear criteria for choice e.g. teaching ability, personality, health, personal integrity • Broad general scholarship • Extensive experience along the field of specialization • Professional competence and communication skills recognized and *For schools definite system of ranking and promotion *Faculty manual *Suggested criteria for ranking: training, teaching competence, length of service, efficiency, productive scholarship, community extension services, good moral character 2008 36 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  37. 37. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 37 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas Accreditation Minimum Standards CHED Minimum Standards *Probationary period of not more than 3 years Adequate probationary period • 6. Ranking Promotion • Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents Definite procedure for separation/ dismissal recognized • Definite system of and *For schools definite ranking & promotion system of ranking and promotion *Faculty manual • Faculty handbook *Suggested criteria • Criteria for ranking for ranking: and promotion training, teaching includes training, competence, teaching ability, length of service, scholarly efficiency, publication, length of productive service to the college scholarship, and/or department, community further educational extension services, attainment, good moral community character involvement and commitment to the objectives of the college • *Probationary period of not more than 3 years Adequate probationary period • Definite procedure for separation/ dismissal Numerical 2008 37 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  38. 38. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 38 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards 7. Performance evaluation No standard • Regular specified performance evaluation • Evaluation instrument accepted by the faculty 8. Faculty Development *Maintains development program for faculty • Long term faculty development program • Professional growth program • Membership in professional organizations • Productive scholarships, continuing research and publications; continuous professional growth 9. Faculty Relations No standard specified equivalent based on institutional documents • Participation in policy making and curricular program evaluation • Satisfactory relations between and among academic community. 2008 38 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  39. 39. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 39 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents 10. Salaries and *Salaries paid in • Fringe Benefits full or regular basis and on time Salaries and compensation assure a living standard in conformity with the social demands of profession • System of financial and promotional advancement • Social security program and other fringe benefits INSTRUCTION 1. Program of Studies *Curricula reflect • Curricula reflect the mission institution’s/progra statement of the m’s objectives and school have clear-cut goals for human and national development *126 academic • Program of study units required for exceeds CHED graduation except requirements and for board courses. follow logical sequencing of subjects • Existence and updating of syllabi fro special courses 2008 39 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  40. 40. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 40 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas 2. Instructional Procedures 3. Classroom Management CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards *High standard of Instruction Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents • Development of analytical and critical judgment • Stimulation of students’ social awareness • Variety of teaching procedures; judicious use of teaching aids • Punctual attendance • Number of students appropriate to size and acoustics of room • Classroom atmosphere conducive to learning • For ordinary lecture courses involving: -Recitation-45 Students -Language courses 40 students -Science courses – 20 students/lab asst. -Purely lecture – depending on available/ appropriate physical facilities Numerical 2008 40 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  41. 41. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 41 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards equivalent based on institutional documents 4. Academic *Clear criteria for • Just appraisal of performance of promotion student Students performance • Clear criteria for promotion • Variety of reliable and valid evaluation tools used • Remedial and enrichment classes where needed • Consultation by faculty with students 5. Supervision for *Definite program Effective of supervision and Instruction evaluation • Periodic updating of syllabi • Classroom visitation/ observation • Conferencing by the dean with teachers 6. Co-curricular Activities ` • Relevance to overall academic program • Students actively participate in cocurricular activities • Monitoring of activities 2008 41 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  42. 42. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 42 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Area/Sub-Areas CHED Minimum Standards Accreditation Minimum Standards 7. Academic Counseling • Available academic guidance and counseling • Availability of faculty with specific schedules for counseling 8. Performance of Graduates in the Licensure Examination Numerical equivalent based on institutional documents • Average passing percentage for the last 3 years: LI – 50% of the national passing average; LII – 60% of the national passing average; LII First RA – 75% of the national passing average; LII Second RA – 100% of the national passing average; LIII – Beyond national passing average Chapter 4 2008 42 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  43. 43. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 43 - GRADUATE SCHOOL PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA This chapter presents the documentary analysis and interpretation of the institutional documents available specifically on the areas of faculty and instruction. This study further analyzes the readiness of two areas as responded by the exhibits and documents available. A. FACULTY 1. Academic Qualification Rubrics 1 The School has a policy on recruitment of faculty members Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Ranking 5 A.1 Develop guidelines to improve implementation of the policy Effective procedure of recruitment and hiring 4 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81- 100% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met 61-80% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met 41-60% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met 21-40% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met 1-20% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met 0% of the guidelines, procedure and recruitment are met TABLE 1 2008 43 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  44. 44. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 44 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Degree of Implementation of the Policy on Recruitment for Faculty Members DEPARTM ENT Elementary High School College Graduate School Total Rating 1 (Applicat ion) 2 (Selecti on) 3 (Demo Teachi ng) 4 (Intervi ew) √ √ × × √ √ √ √ 5 (Signi ng of Contra ct) √ √ √ × √ √ √ × √ × × × TOT AL PERCENT AGE 4 4 80.00% 80.00% 4 1 80.00% 20.00% 3.25 65.00% 4 Table 1 shows the breakdown of the procedure of recruitment and hiring that transpired in each level. The elementary teachers have four out of five or 80.00 percent, the high school teachers with four out of five or 80.00 percent, four out of five or 80.00 percent for the college instructors and professors and one out of five or 20.00 percent in the professors in the graduate school. An average of 65.00 percent with a numerical rating of 4 is taken, based on the range of percentage presented in the rubrics–based PACUCOA instrument. Rubrics 2 The Percentage of Faculty Members with Earned 2008 44 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  45. 45. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 45 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Graduate Degree is Satisfactory Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Ranking 5 4 A.2 Appropriate attractive salary scale to be able to hire MA and Ph.D. degree holders Qualified Faculty Members 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81- 100% of the faculty members are qualified 61-80% of the faculty members are qualified 41-60% of the faculty members are qualified 21-40% of the faculty members are qualified 1-20% of the faculty members are qualified 0% of the faculty members are qualified Table 2 Frequency Distribution of Teachers Having Earned 2008 45 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  46. 46. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 46 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Graduate Degree Courses Actual Number of Faculty Members Qualified Faculty Members Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 14 93.33 College 19 2 10.52 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 34 66.67 4 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING Table 2 shows the breakdown of the qualified faculty members for each level. Seven out of seven or 100 percent in the elementary teachers are qualified, 14 out of 15 or 93.33 percent of the faculty in the high school are qualified. Due to verticalization policy by CHED, there are two out of 19 or 10.52 percent who are qualified. To sum up, there are 34 out of 51 or 66.67 percent of the faculty who are qualified enough to be part of the academic community, resulting to a numerical rating of 4, based on the range of percentage presented in the rubrics-based PACUCOA instrument. Rubrics 3 Faculty Members Teach Courses in Their Field of Specialization 2008 46 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  47. 47. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 47 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment 81-100% of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 61-80% of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 41-60% of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 21-40% of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 1-20% of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 0% of the faculty of the faculty members teach their line of specialization 5 Faculty should only be assigned to their line of specialization A.3 4 Qualified Faculty members teach their line of specialization Indicators Ranking 3  2 1 0 Table 3 Frequency Distribution of Teachers Teaching their Field of Specialization Number of Faculty Members Qualified Faculty Members Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 14 93.33 College 19 2 10.52 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 34 66.67 4 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING Table 3 shows the breakdown of faculty members who teach their line of specialization, seven out of seven teachers or 100 percent are qualified in the Elementary, 14 out of 15 teachers or 93.33 percent are qualified in the high 2008 47 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  48. 48. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 48 - GRADUATE SCHOOL school. Due to the verticalization of CHED, only two out of 19 or 10.52 percent college teachers are qualified. A numerical rating of 4 is achieved based on the range of percentage presented in the rubrics-based PACUCOA instrument. Rubrics 4 Deficiencies in Graduate Degrees of Faculty Members are Compensated by Other Qualifications Such as Satisfactory Teaching Experience and Professional Practice Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Ranking 5 A.4 Seminars and In-service training Satisfactory Teaching experience and professional practice 4 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 61-80% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 41-60% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 21-40% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 1-20% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 0% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience Table 4 Frequency Distribution of Satisfactory Teaching Experience and Professional Practice 2008 48 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  49. 49. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 49 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Actual Number of Faculty Members Faculty with at least 3 years of experience Percentage Elementary 7 5 71.43 High School 15 6 40.00 College 19 13 68.42 41 24 58.54 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 3 Table 4 shows the percentage of Faculty members with at least 3 years of teaching experience. A total of 24 out of 41 faculty members or 58.54 percent have more than three years of teaching experience. Five out of seven teachers or 71.43 percent are qualified in the Elementary, six out of 15 teachers or 40.00 percent are qualified in the High School and 13 out of 19 teachers or 68.42 percent are qualified in the college department. A numerical rating of 3 according to rubrics-based PACUCOA instrument is given.. 2008 49 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  50. 50. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 50 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 5 Faculty Members Assigned to Practicum Courses Have at Least Three Years of Experience in Their Specialized Field of Study Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 A.5 Only faculty having 3 years and above experience in their field of specialization should be hired 4 Practicum subjects to be handled by the Faculty 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 61-80% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 41-60% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 21-40% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 1-20% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience 0% of the faculty members have satisfactory teaching experience Table 5 Frequency Distribution of the Number of Years of Experience of the Faculty Assigned to Practicum Courses Elementary High School College TOTAL Actual Number of Faculty Members Faculty that handles Practicum subjects with at least 3 years of experience Percentage 7 15 19 41 DEPARTMENT 5 10 17 32 71.43 66.67 89.47 78.05 NUMERICAL RATING 2008 4 50 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  51. 51. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 51 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 5 shows the percentage of Faculty members teaching practicum courses with at least 3 years. A total of 32 out of 41 faculty members or 78.05% have more than three years of teaching experience in their field of specialization. Five out of seven teachers or 71.43 percent are qualified in the Elementary, 10 out of 15 teachers or 66.67 percent are qualified in the High School and 13 out of 19 teachers or 89.47 percent are qualified in the college. A numerical rating of 4 is achieved according to the rubrics–based PACUCOA instrument. Rubrics 6 Faculty Members are Updated on Global Issues and Technology Academic Qualification Sub section Program Alternativ e Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment 5 A.6 Special Studies in global issues and technology Faculty equipped with knowledge of global issues and technology Indicators Ranking 4 3  2 1 0 81-100% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 61-80% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 41-60% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 21-40% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 1-20% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 0% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues Table 6 2008 51 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  52. 52. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 52 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Frequency Distribution of the Faculty Members Equipped with Knowledge on Global Issues and Technology Actual Number of Faculty Faculty Equipped with Knowledge of Global Issues and Technology Percentage Elementary 7 5 71.43 High School 15 14 93.33 College 19 19 100.00 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 48 94.12 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 5 Table 6 shows that a total of 48 out of 51 faculty members or 94.12%% are equipped with enough knowledge on global issues and technology. In the elementary, five out of seven teachers or 71.43 percent are equipped with knowledge in global issues & technology, 14 out of 15 teachers or 93.33 percent in the High School, 19 out of 19 teachers or 100 percent in the college, and 10 out of 10 teachers or 100 percent in the Graduate School. This results to a numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics–based PACUCOA instrument. 2. 2008 PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE 52 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  53. 53. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 53 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 7 Faculty Members Endeavor to Implement the Purposes and Objectives of the Institution and the Specific Objectives of the College Under Survey Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 B.1 Include this in the syllabi and introduction to every class orientation Vision and Mission in each of the syllabus 3 X 2 1 0 2008 Indicators 81-100% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 61-80% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 41-60% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 21-40% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 1-20% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 0% of the syllabus of the faculty include mission and vision of MPC 53 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  54. 54. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 54 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 7 Frequency Distribution of Teachers who Include Vision, Mission, Goals and Objectives of the Institution in Their Syllabi Actual Number of Faculty Teachers who include vision, mission, goals and objectives of the institution in their syllabi Percentage Elementary 7 0 0 High School 15 0 0 College 19 0 0 Graduate School 10 0 0 51 0 0 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 0 Table 7 shows the frequency distribution of teachers who include vision, mission, goals and objectives of the institution in their syllabi. Zero out of 51 faculty members include vision, mission, goals and objectives of the institution in their syllabi. A numerical rating of 0 according to the rubrics is taken. Rubrics 8 Follow the Syllabi and Enrich Them Through Additional Reading 2008 54 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  55. 55. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 55 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 B.2 Require students to submit book reports and current issues reports 4 Student book reports 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports 61-80% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports 41-60% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports 21-40% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports 1-20% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports 0% of the faculty have compilation of students’ book reports Table 8 Frequency Distribution of Faculty with Compilation of Student’s Book Reports Actual Number of faculty Faculty with compilation of student’s book reports Percentage Elementary 7 0 0 High School 15 0 0 College 19 3 15.79 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 13 25.49 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 2 Table 8 shows the percentage of Faculty members with compilations of student’s book reports. A total of 13 out of 51 faculty members or 25.49% 2008 55 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  56. 56. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 56 - GRADUATE SCHOOL have student book reports compilation. There are no book reports compilation from faculty members in both the Elementary and High School. Three out of 19 teachers in the college or 15.79 percent have. Ten out of 10 teachers in the Graduate School or 100 percent have compilation. The result has a numerical rating of 2 according to the rubrics. Rubrics 9 “Show Mastery of Subject Matter” Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 B.3 This should be evident by the observation and evaluation reports 4 Class observation reports  3 2 1 0 2008 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 61-80% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 41-60% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 21-40% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 1-20% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 0% of the faculty were observed by the administrators 56 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  57. 57. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 57 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 9 Frequency Distribution of Teachers who were Observed by the Administrators Actual Number of Faculty Member Faculty observed by the administrators Percentage Elementary 7 6 85.71 High School 15 11 73.33 College 19 15 78.95 41 32 78.05 DEPARTMENT TOTAL 4 NUMERICAL RATING Table 9 shows the percentage of faculty members who were observed by the administrators. A total of 32 out of 41 faculty members or 58.54 percent were observed. Six out of seven teachers or 85.71 percent were observed in the Elementary, 11 out of 15 teachers or 73.33 percent in the High School, and 15 out of 19 teachers or 78.95 percent in the college. The result has a numerical rating of 4 according to the rubrics. 2008 57 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  58. 58. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 58 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 10 “Show Evidence of Preparedness for Classes” Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes Assessment No Rating 81-100% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 61-80% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 41-60% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 21-40% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 1-20% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 0% of the faculty have notes on daily exercises 5 Require faculty to have objective evidence of prepared daily practical exercises B.4 4 Notes on daily exercises 3  Indicators 2 1 0 Table 10 Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Notes on Daily Exercises Actual Number of faculty Faculty with notes on daily exercises Percentage Elementary 7 5 71.43 High School 15 14 93.33 College 19 19 100.00 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 48 94.12 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 2008 5 58 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  59. 59. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 59 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 10 shows the percentage of Faculty members with notes on daily exercises. A total of 48 out of 51 faculty members or 94.12 percent have notes, with five out of seven teachers or 71.43 percent in the Elementary, 14 out of 15 teachers or 40.00 percent in the High School, 19 out of 19 teachers or 100.00 percent in the college, and 10 out of 10 teachers or 100.00 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is attained. Rubrics 11 Faculty Members are Aware of Recent Educational Trends and Problems and are Able to Relate Subject Matter to Current Local and Global Issues Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 B.5 Special Studies in global issues and technology Global issue reports 3 X 2 1 0 2008 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 61-80% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 41-60% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 21-40% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 1-20% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 0% of the faculty members are knowledgeable about global issues 59 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  60. 60. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 60 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 11 Frequency Distribution of Faculty Members who are Aware of Recent Educational Trends and Problems and are Able to Relate Subject Matter to Current Local and Global Issues Actual Number of Faculty Teachers who are knowledgeable about global issues Percentage Elementary 7 0 0 High School 15 0 0 College 19 0 0 TOTAL 41 0 0 DEPARTMENT NUMERICAL RATING 0 Table 11 shows the frequency distribution of teachers who are knowledgeable about global issues. Zero out of 41 faculty members are knowledgeable on the said issue. A numerical rank of 0 according to the PACUCOA-based rubrics is taken. 2008 60 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  61. 61. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 61 - GRADUATE SCHOOL RUBRICS 12 Evidence of Effective Use of Library, Internet, Instructional Media and Other Instructional Devices Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating Indicators 3 81-100% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 61-80% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 41-60% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 2 21-40% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 1 1-20% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 0 0% of the faculty use internet and multi-media resources 5 Present logbook of internet access and multimedia usage in classroom B.6 4 Logbook for internet and multimedia usage  Table12 Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Logbook for Internet and Multi-Media Usage Elementary High School College Graduate School TOTAL Actual Number of Faculty Member Faculty with logbook for internet and multimedia usage 7 15 19 10 51 DEPARTMENT 2 4 11 4 21 NUMERICAL RATING 2008 Percentage 28.57 26.67 57.89 40.00 41.18 3 61 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  62. 62. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 62 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 12 shows the percentage of faculty members with logbook for internet and multimedia usage. A total of 21 out of 51 faculty members or 41.18 percent do have logbooks. Two out of seven teachers or 28.57 percent in the Elementary, four out of 15 teachers or 26.67 percent in the High School, 11 out of 19 teachers or 57.89 percent in the college and 10 out of 10 teachers or 100 percent in the Graduate School have logbook. This feature has a numerical rating of 3 according to the rubrics. Rubrics 13 “Show Evidences of Professional Growth Through Research Activity and Publication and/or Membership in Recognized Educational Organization and Association” Professional Performance Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 B.7 Require faculty to engage in group research and encourage them to join Research Organizations Compilati on of researches and actual uploading of membership 4 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches 61-80% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches 41-60% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches 21-40% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches 1-20% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches 0% of the faculty submitted their compiled action researches Table 13 2008 62 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  63. 63. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 63 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Compiled Action Researches Actual Number of Faculty Member Faculty with compilation of action researches Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 15 100.00 College 19 19 100.00 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 51 100.00 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 5 Table 13 shows the percentage of faculty members with compilation of action researches. A total of 51 out of 51 faculty members or 100.00 percent submit action researches to help the administration in overseeing problems within the school. Seven out of seven teachers or 100.00 percent in the Elementary, 154 out of 15 teachers or 100.00 percent in the High School, 19 out of 19 teachers or 100.00 percent in the college, and 10 out of 10 teachers or 100 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is achieved. 3. 2008 TEACHING ASSIGNMENT 63 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  64. 64. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 64 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 14 “A Policy of Determining Teaching Assignments is Adopted and Followed” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 C.1 Adoption of determining teacher’s assignment Policy on teaching assignment 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty have 24 maximum loads with 3 preparations 61-80% of the faculty have 24 maximum loads with 4 preparations 41-60% of the faculty have 24 maximum loads with 5 preparations 21-40% of the faculty have 24 maximum loads with 6 preparations 1-20% of the faculty have 24 maximum loads with 7 preparations None of the above Table 14 Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Maximum Load of 24 units Actual Number of faculty Faculty with maximum load of 24 units Percentage Elementary 7 0 0 High School 15 3 20.00 College TOTAL 19 41 15 18 78.95 43.90 3 DEPARTMENT NUMERICAL RATING Table 14 shows the percentage of faculty members with maximum load of 24 units. A total of 18 out of 41 faculty members or 43.90 percent do 2008 64 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  65. 65. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 65 - GRADUATE SCHOOL have a maximum load; zero out of seven teachers or zero percent in the Elementary, three out of 15 teachers or 20.00 percent in the High School, and 15 out of 19 teachers or 78.95 percent in the college. A numerical rating of 3 according to the rubrics is taken. Rubrics 15 “The Percentage of Faculty Members Employed on a Full-time Basis Meets Accreditation Requirements” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 C.2 percentage of full time instructors against part time percentage of full time instructors against part time 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty members are full-time instructors 61-80% of the faculty members are full-time instructors 41-60% of the faculty members are full-time instructors 21-40% of the faculty members are full-time instructors 1-20% of the faculty members are full-time instructors 0% of the faculty members are full-time instructors Table 15 Frequency Distribution of Full Time Faculty Instructors 2008 65 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  66. 66. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 66 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Actual Number of faculty Full Time Faculty Instructors Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 15 100.00 College 19 19 100.00 Graduate School 10 4 40.00 51 45 88.24 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 5 Table 15 shows the percentage of Full time faculty members. A total of 45 out of 51 faculty members or 88.24 percent are full time instructors. Seven out of seven teachers or 100.00 in the Elementary, 15 out of 15 teachers or 100.00 percent in the High School, 19 out of 19 teachers or 100.00 percent in the college, and four out of 10 teachers or 40.00 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is achieved. 2008 66 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  67. 67. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 67 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 16 “Faculty Members are Given Teaching Assignment Only In Their Major Fields of Specialization” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating Indicators 3 81-100% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 61-80% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 41-60% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 2 21-40% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 1 1-20% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 0 0% of the faculty members teach their field of specialization 5 4 C.3 Teacher’s schedule showing qualification Teacher’s schedule showing qualification  Table 16 Frequency Distribution of Teachers who Teach their Field of Specialization DEPARTMENT Actual Number of faculty Faculty members who teach their field of specialization Elementary High School College Graduate School TOTAL 7 15 19 10 51 7 14 2 10 34 NUMERICAL RATING 2008 Percentage 100.00 93.33 10.52 100.00 66.67 5 67 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  68. 68. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 68 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 16 shows the breakdown of faculty members who teach their line of specialization. Seven out of seven teachers or 100 percent are qualified in the Elementary, 14 out of 15 teachers or 93.33 percent are qualified in the high school. Due to the verticalization of CHED, only two out of 19 or 10.52 percent college teachers are qualified. A numerical rating of 4 is achieved based on the range of percentage presented in the rubrics-based PACUCOA instrument. Rubrics 17 “Teaching Loads of Faculty Members (Both Full-time and Part-time) Allow Sufficient Time for Preparation of Classes and Adequate Evaluation of Student Achievement” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes C.4 There should be no three consecutive lecture classes assigned to each faculty + B.4 2008 Class schedule showing that teachers have no 3 consecutive hours lecturing in his classes No Assessment Rating 5 4  3 2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 61-80% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 41-60% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 21-40% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 1-20% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 0% of the faculty do not teach 3 consecutive hours 68 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  69. 69. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 69 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 17 Frequency Distribution of Teachers with No 3 Consecutive Teaching Hours Actual Number of faculty Teachers with no 3 consecutive teaching hours Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 15 100.00 College 19 14 73.68 41 36 87.80 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 5 Table 17 shows the percentage of faculty members with no three consecutive teaching hours. A total of 36 out of 51 faculty members or 87.80 percent do not have three consecutive teaching hours. Seven out of seven teachers or 100.00 percent in the Elementary, 15 out of 15 teachers or 100.00 percent in the High School and 14 out of 19 teachers or 73.68 percent in the college do not engage themselves teaching for three consecutive hours. A numerical rating of 5 according to rubrics is noted. 2008 69 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  70. 70. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 70 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 18 “The Quality of Teacher Performance is Considered When Assigning Faculty Load” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 C.5 The quality of instruction a teacher has Policy on teaching assignment 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty satisfactory performance 61-80% of the faculty satisfactory performance 41-60% of the faculty satisfactory performance 21-40% of the faculty satisfactory performance have have have have 1-20% of the faculty have satisfactory performance 0% of the faculty have teaching assignment Table 18 Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Satisfactory Performance Actual Number of faculty Faculty with satisfactory performance Percentage Elementary 7 5 71.43 High School 15 12 80.00 College 19 18 94.74 Graduate School 10 10 100.00 51 45 88.24 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 2008 5 70 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  71. 71. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 71 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 18 shows the percentage of faculty members with satisfactory performance. A total of 45 out of 51 faculty members or 88.24percent have satisfactory performance, five out of seven teachers or 71.43 percent in the Elementary, 12 out of 15 teachers or 80.00 percent in the High School, 18 out of 19 teachers or 94.74 percent in the college and 10 out of 10 teachers or 100 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is achieved. This performance rating of teachers is based on the records without having verified the objectivity of the instrument used in the evaluation. Rubrics 19 “Provision is Made for the Distribution of Extra Class Responsibilities of Faculty Members” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 3 81-100% of the faculty have extra class assignment 61-80% of the faculty have extra class assignment 41-60% of the faculty have extra class assignment 2 21-40% of the faculty have extra class assignment 5 4 C.6 A responsibility checklist showing extra class assignments Policy on extra class assignment Indicators  1 0 1-20% of the faculty have extra class assignment 0% of the faculty have extra class assignment Table 19 2008 71 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  72. 72. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 72 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Frequency Distribution of Teachers with Extra Class Assignment Number of faculty Faculty with Extra Class Assignment Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 15 100.00 College 19 19 100.00 Graduate School 10 4 40.00 51 45 88.24 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 5 Table 19 shows the percentage of faculty members with extra class assignment. A total of 45 out of 51 faculty members or 88.24 percent have extra class assignment, seven out of 7 teachers or 100.00 percent in the Elementary, 15 out of 15 teachers or 100.00 percent in the High School, 19 out of 19 teachers or 100.00 percent in the college and four out of 10 teachers or 40 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is attained. Rubrics 20 2008 72 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  73. 73. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 73 - GRADUATE SCHOOL “Student-Faculty Ratio is Generally Satisfactory” Teaching Assignment Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 C.7 Enrolmen t status per class Enrolmen t status per class 3  2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio 61-80% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio 41-60% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio 21-40% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio 1-20% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio 0% of the classes have 35:1 student-teacher ratio Table 20 Frequency Distribution of Classes with 40 Students and below Actual Number of Class Classes with 40 students and below Percentage Elementary 7 7 100.00 High School 15 0 0 College 21 17 80.95 43 24 55.81 3 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 2008 73 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  74. 74. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 74 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 20 shows the percentage of classes with 40 students and below. A total of 24 out of 43 classes or 55.81 percent have 35 and below students. Seven out of seven classes or 100.00 percent in the Elementary, zero out of 15 classes or 0 percent in the High School and 17 out of 21 classes or 80.95 percent in the college. A numerical rating of 3 according to the rubrics is noted. 4. RANK, TENURE RENUMERATION AND FRINGE BENEFITS Rubrics 21 “Promotion in Rank and Salary Which Includes Teaching Ability, Research and/or Publication, Community Services, Academic Degrees and Continuing Professional Education” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes 2008  All the factors considered 7-8 factors are considered 3 5-6 factors are considered 2 3-4 factors are considered 1 1-2 factor/s is/are considered 0 Policy on promotion Indicators 4 D.1 Rating 5 Provision on the criteria for promotion in rank and salary No Assessment No factor is considered 74 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  75. 75. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 75 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 21 The Criteria for Promotion in Rank and Salary DEPARTMENT 1 2 3 4 5 Total Percentage Elementary √ √ X √ √ 4 80.00 High School √ √ X √ √ 4 80.00 College √ √ X √ √ 4 80.00 4 80.00 TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 4 Table 21 shows that the 4 out of 5 policies on the promotion of faculty are being observed. A numerical rating of 4 according to the rubrics is achieved. 2008 75 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  76. 76. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 76 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 22 “In the Application of the Criteria, the Recommendation of College Administrators, Department Chairpersons, Students, Peer Groups and Others” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 D.2 Provision on the application of D.1 3 Policy on promotion  2 1 0 Indicators All the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty Only 4 of the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty Only 3of the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty Only 2of the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty Only 1of the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty None of the identified personalities have a say in the promotion of a faculty Table 22 The Groups Who are Entitled to Recommend Faculty for Promotion DEPARTMENT Elementary High School College College Administrators Dep’t Chairperson Students Peer Groups Others TOTAL Percentage √ √ √ X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 20.00 20.00 20.00 1 20.00 1 AVERAGE NUMERICAL RATING 2008 76 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  77. 77. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 77 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 22 shows that only College administrators have a say on the policy on promotions of faculty. A numerical rating of 1 according to the rubrics is taken. Rubrics 23 “The Salary Rates are Adequate in Meeting the Economic and Social Demands of the Profession” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 D.3 Research output to prove economic viability of salaries Satisfactor y salary rates of faculty 3  2 1 Indicators 81-100% of the faculty receiving salary above minimum wage 61-80% of the faculty receiving salary above minimum wage 41-80% of the faculty receiving salary above minimum wage 21-40% of the faculty receiving salary above minimum wage 1-20% of the faculty receiving salary above minimum wage are the are the are the are the are the 0 Table 23 2008 77 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  78. 78. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 78 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Frequency Distribution of Teachers Receiving Above Minimum Wage Actual Number of faculty Faculty members receiving above minimum wage Percentage Elementary 7 2 28.57 High School 15 8 53.33 College 19 18 94.74 41 28 68.29 DEPARTMENT TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 4 Table 23 shows the percentage of faculty members receiving above minimum wage. There are 28 out of 41 faculty members or 68.29 percent who receive above minimum wage; two out of seven teachers or 28.57 percent in the elementary, eight out of 15 teachers or 53.33 percent in the high school and 18 out of 19 teachers or 94.74 percent in the College. A numerical rank of 4 according to the rubrics is achieved. Rubrics 24 2008 78 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  79. 79. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 79 - GRADUATE SCHOOL “The Benefits and Responsibility of Tenure are Clearly Described in the Faculty Manual or Elsewhere” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 Resolve policy of tenure D.4 Policy of tenure  3 2 1 0 Indicators 81-100% of the policy are being observed 61-80% of the policy are being observed 41-60% of the policy are being observed 21-40% of the policy are being observed 1-20% of the policy are being observed There is no policy on tenure being made Table 24 Frequency Distribution of Permanent Teachers Actual Number of Faculty Permanent Percentage Elementary 7 6 85.71 High School 15 8 53.33 College 19 12 63.16 Graduate School TOTAL 10 51 4 30 40.00 58.82 3 DEPARTMENT NUMERICAL RATING Table 24 shows the percentage of permanent faculty members. A total of 30 out of 51 faculty members or 58.82 percent are permanent. Six out of 2008 79 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  80. 80. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 80 - GRADUATE SCHOOL seven teachers or 85.71 percent in the Elementary, eight out of 15 teachers or 53.33 percent in the High School, 12 out of 19 teachers or 63.16 percent in the college, and four out of 10 professors or 40 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 3 according to the rubrics is achieved. Rubrics 25 “There are Definite Policies for Termination of Employment” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating 5 4 D.5 Develop guidelines for policy on termination Policy on termination  3 2 1 0 2008 Indicators 81-100% of the policy are being observed 61-80% of the policy are being observed 41-60% of the policy are being observed 21-60% of the policy are being observed 1-20% of the policy are being observed There is no policy on termination being made 80 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  81. 81. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 81 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 25 shows that 12 out of 13 or 92.31 percent of the policies on termination are being observed: 12 out of 13 policies or 92.31 percent in the elementary, 12 out of 13 policies or 92.31 percent in the high school, 12 out of 13 policies or 92.31 percent in the college and 12 out of 13 policies or 92.31 percent in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 5 according to the rubrics is attained. Rubrics 26 “Fringe Benefits are Enjoyed by Faculty Members Such as: Sick Leave, Vacation Leave, Mandated Leave, Maternity Leave, Study Leave With Pay, Study Leave Without Pay, etc” Rank, Tenure, Remuneration and Fringe Benefits Sub section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes No Assessment Rating Indicators 3 All the identified benefits are implemented Only 6 identified benefits are implemented Only 5 identified benefits are implemented 2 Only 3-4 identified benefits are implemented 1 Only 1-2 identified benefits are implemented 0 No identified benefits are implemented 5 4 D.6 2008 Develop guidelines for policy on benefits Policy on benefits  81 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  82. 82. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 82 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Table 26 The Policies on Fringe Benefits Enjoyed by the Faculty DEPARTMENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total Elementary √ √ X √ √ X X √ 5 High School √ √ X √ √ X X √ 5 College √ √ X √ √ X X √ 5 Graduate School √ √ X √ √ X X √ 5 TOTAL 5 NUMERICAL RATING 3 Table 26 shows that 5 out of 8 of the policies on fringe benefits are being observed: five out of eight policies in the elementary, five out of eight policies in the high school, five out of eight policies in the college and fie out of eight policies in the Graduate School. A numerical rating of 3 according to the rubrics is achieved. 5. 2008 FACULTY DEVELOPMENT 82 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation
  83. 83. <<MALLIG PLAINS COLLEGES, INC.>> - 83 - GRADUATE SCHOOL Rubrics 27 “The Faculty Development Program of the College Gives Provision for: Scholarship, Fellowship, Study Grants, Stress Management And Acquaintance” Faculty Development Sub Section Program Alternative Expected Output Identification of existence Yes Assessment No Rating Indicators All provisions in the standards are available Only 5 provisions in the standards are available Only 4 provisions in the standards are available Only 3 provisions in the standards are available Only 1-2 provision/s in the standards is/are available There are no available provisions in the standards 5 Provision for scholarships, fellowships and study grants of faculty members E.1 4 Policy on Faculty Development Program 3  2 1 0 Table 27 The Faculty Development Program of the College Gives Provisions for Scholarships, Fellowships, Sabbatical Leaves, Faculty Loans for Professional Growth and Research Grants DEPARTMENT 1 2 3 4 5 Total Elementary √ √ √ √ √ 5 High School √ √ √ √ √ 5 College √ √ √ √ √ 5 5 5 TOTAL NUMERICAL RATING 2008 83 The Level of Readiness of Faculty and Instruction of Mallig Plains Colleges Towards Accreditation

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