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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • As a communication specialist and wordsmith, guess which slide I like a lot.Number 18. These are word nuances and rephrasings I've heard you mention before, but they really landed in this SlideShare. I expect it will have a ripple effect in my lean languaging.
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  • Helping directors and tech managers involves a broader scope than just lean process, such as strategy translation to their unit, annual budgeting workshops, projects for capability improvement that include machines and IT as well as process. Then middle managers call.
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  • Brilliant! This is the challenge we are facing and the direction we are headed. This presentation really helped bring it all together for me.
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  • I like the approach. Especially the little things like better wording that can make a difference such as ' 'Make teams better at achieving goals and meeting challenges' & 'Iterate rapildly towards a measureable goal with an achieve by date'. I am really interested in the topic of the manager as a coach. Most managers feel they already are a coach to some degree and I am sure this is true. But not as deliberately and routinely as we need in order to see a consistent source of improvement. Helping managers see the need to develop their coaching skills by practicing them daily has a current challenge I have.
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  • Seems like a very reasonable way to diffuse a new culture to an organization such that the improvement and coaching katas become standard behavioral practice. Somehow upper management has to be a part of the behavioral change or else there would be a disconnect I would think--just thoughts off the top of my head here.
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    Who is the Lean Staff's Customer? Who is the Lean Staff's Customer? Presentation Transcript

    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY Who IS THE LEAN STAFF’S CUSTOMER? FOR DISCUSSION Mike  Rother   July  2013     Copyright  ©  2013    
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 2   Focusing  on  managers  may  be  a  prerequisite  for  ge;ng   con<nuous  improvement,  adapta<on  and  even  innova<on   integrated  into  the  opera<on  of  organiza<ons.     If  the  Lean  Army  doesn't  make  this  shiG  then  either   (1)  organiza<ons  may  con<nue  having  difficulty  seeing  that   improvement  is  a  manager's  role,  or  (2)  some  group  other   than  the  Lean  community  may  bring  it  in.   Will  the  Lean  Army  move  beyond  the  “Lean”  space   and  into  general  management?  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 3   Over  the  past  15  years,  organizaGons  worldwide  have  built  an  army   of  internal  Lean  staff  persons  to  support  Lean  transformaGon.  This   Lean  army  has  extensive  knowledge  of  Lean  pracGces  and  can  apply   them  to  all  sorts  of  work  processes  and  value  streams.   However,  there’s  also  a  growing  consensus  that  the  Lean   effort  isn’t  working  as  planned.  In  short,  Lean  has  tended   to  remain  a  task-­‐force  acGvity  rather  than  being  integrated   into  how  organizaGons  manage  themselves  day-­‐to-­‐day.   Background  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 4   This  may  be  a  good  Gme  for  some  PDCA;  to  reflect   and  adjust.    With  that  in  mind,  this  SlideShare  raises   the  quesGons…     What  role  should  the  Lean  staff  play?     Whom  should  the  Lean  army  be  serving?   It’s  a  good  Gme  for  the  Lean  Community   to  reflect  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 5   Lean  Staff   Value-­‐Stream   Manager   One  view  is  that  the  Lean  army’s  customer   is  Value-­‐Stream  Managers   VS  Map   Unfortunately,  this  would  help  create  a  Lean  organizaGon  only   if  Lean  were  purely  a  technical  implementaGon  issue.  Today  we   know  that  Lean  is  as  much  an  issue  of  mindset  and  culture   change,  which  requires  daily  pracGce  across  the  organizaGon.     A  value-­‐stream  manager  can  lead  the  design  of  a  future-­‐state   value  stream  and  help  ensure  that  improvement  efforts  align  to   that  challenge,  but  a  value-­‐stream  manager  (if  that  posiGon   even  exists)  can’t  coach  and  guide  daily  pracGce  throughout  a   value  stream.    Change  will  not  happen.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY Lean  Staff   6   Process   Supervisor   and  Team   External   Customer   Another  view  is  that  the  Lean  army's  customer   is  the  Work  Processes   Here  too,  it’s  a  similar  problem.  The  Lean  staff  cannot  be  at   every  process  every  day.  Furthermore,  the  work  processes   report  to  the  organizaGon’s  managers,  not  the  Lean  staff.   Change  will  not  happen.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 7   Yet  another  view  is  that  we  should  get  Senior   Managers  to  do  more  to  lead  the  Lean  charge   Of  course  senior  leaders  should  iniGate  adopGon  of  Lean,   provide  strategic  direcGon  and  model  the  behaviors.     However,  this  viewpoint  is  a  kind  of  “let’s  not  change  anything”   stance,  i.e.,  the  Lean  army  can  keep  doing  what  it's  doing   and  senior  managers  need  to  get  behind  it  more.     The  idea  seems  to  be  to  use  senior  managers  to  force  change   among  managers  who  should  be  doing  Lean  but  aren't.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 8   Here’s  another  viewpoint:     Maybe  managers  are  thinking  of  Lean  as  an   episodic  side  acGvity  that  isn’t  their  job  because   it's  not  seen  by  them  as  something  that  helps   them  reach  their  goals.     If  we  take  this  viewpoint,  then  an  adjustment  for   the  Lean  army  is  to  reposiGon  itself  as  a  service   and  support  funcGon  to  middle  managers;    to   help  those  managers  be  successful!   ANOTHER  WAY  TO  LOOK  AT  IT  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 9   Proposal  for  discussion:     THE  LEAN  ARMY  SHOULD   SERVE  MIDDLE  MANAGERS   Building  on  achievements  of  the  last  15  years,  Lean  staff   departments  should  posiGon  themselves  to  more  directly   help  middle  managers  achieve  goals  and  be  successful.     This  has  a  beier  chance  of  integraGng  Lean  into  the  fabric  of   an  organizaGon,  because  middle  managers  may  have  more   influence  on  an  organizaGon's  capability  than  any  other  group.     Since  managers  are  teachers  every  day,  they  are  the  primary   actors  who  create  and  perpetuate  an  organizaGon's  culture.   Managers  are  also  the  link  between  the  strategic  policy  level  of   senior  leaders  and  execuGon  in  the  rest  of  the  organizaGon.     Managers  drive  what  and  how  the  operaGonal  level  executes.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 10   STRUCTURED  PRACTICE  TO  DEVELOP  NEW  HABITS   The  Improvement  Kata  paiern  is  a  fundamental  way  of  working   at  Toyota  and  there  are  several  acGviGes  where  this  paiern  gets   uGlized  and  reinforced.    These  include  daily  management,  daily   problem  solving,  quality  circles,  improvement  events,  standard   work,  ‘Toyota  Business  PracGces’  and  A3s.     However,  the  Improvement  Kata  paiern  is  actually  lodged  in   Toyota's  people;  specifically  in  its  seasoned  coaches  who  guide   learners  in  repeaGng  this  way  of  thinking  and  acGng.    Just  copying   those  visible  Toyota  acGviGes  –  such  as  A3s  –  without  bringing   along  the  underlying  coaching  is  unlikely  to  change  much.     Mindset  change  and  skill  development  come  from  correct  pracGce   of  a  paiern,  not  just  from  parGcipaGng  in  Toyota-­‐style  acGviGes.     Teams  and  organizaGons  outside  Toyota  will  require  more   structured  rouGnes  for  beginners  to  pracGce,  and  for  turning  their   middle  managers  into  coaches.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 11   MANAGERS  TEACH  LEAN  HABITS,  OR  NOT  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 12   THE  NATURE  OF  WORK  MAY  BE  CHANGING   Many  management  pracGces  of  the  20th  Century  evolved   to  ensure  that  repeGGve  tasks  got  done  efficiently  and   equipment  uGlizaGon  was  maximized.       Not  much  creaGvity  is  needed  in  the  organizaGon  in  that  case,   and  our  workplaces  are  full  of  managers  who  have  been   trained  and  are  pracGced  in  a  command-­‐and-­‐control  model.     Today  many  companies  are  valuing  skills,  mindset  and   organizaGonal  culture  that's  characterized  by  goal-­‐oriented   creaBvity  -­‐-­‐  just  like  the  capability  that's  developed  by   pracGcing  the  Improvement  Kata  -­‐-­‐  as  they  deal  with   disrupGve  technologies  and  fast-­‐moving  compeGGon.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 13   THE  ROLE  OF  MANAGERS  MAY  BE  CHANGING   And  they  can  use  our  help   There  was  a  Gme  when  a  managerʼs   job  was  to  organize  the  work,  assign   the  right  people  to  the  necessary   tasks,  monitor  the  results  and   ensure  the  job  got  done  as  ordered.     A  main  focus  was  task  efficiency.   Todayʼs  more  complex  and  dynamic   environment  means  managers  have   to  work  with  their  people  not  just  to   maximize  task  efficiency,  but  to   develop  and  apply  skills  for  achieving   new  goals  and  meeGng  challenges   along  unpredictable  paths.    
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 14   QUESTIONS  FOR  THE  LEAN  ARMY   What  does  it  mean  to  think  of  middle   managers  as  our  customers?     What  is  their  perspecGve?     What  are  their  needs  and  responsibiliGes?   What  is  important  to  them?     What  should  be  the  focus  of  coaching  that   middle  managers  get  from  lean  staff?   Following  are  some  thought  starters…  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 15   Let's  start  changing  our  mental  picture   about  the  role  of  Lean  staff  departments   The  Lean  staff’s  role  is  not  to  do  Lean,  but  to  support  the   manager  in  doing  Lean  as  appropriate  for  achieving  the   manager's  and  the  organizaGon's  goals.  Start  thinking  of  the   primary  role  of  Lean  staff  as  guiding  and  coaching  managers.   "We  rise  by  li+ing  others”                ~  Robert  Ingersoll   FIRST   An  important  element  of  how  organizaGons  deliver  value   is  through  managers  achieving  the  necessary  performance   in  their  operaGonal  teams.  Excellent  results  are  a  result  of   excellent  management.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 16   Lean  shouldn’t  be  a  separate  acGvity   Vice   President   COACH   to  D   COACH   to  C   COACH   to  B   COACH   to  A   LEARNER   to  E   LEARNER   to  D   LEARNER   to  C   Value-­‐Stream   Manager   Department   Manager   Process   Supervisor   Process   Operator   LEARNER   to  B   ConGnuous  improvement  is  a  manager's  job.  Each  manager   is  responsible  for  gepng  the  process  to  the  next  required   level  of  performance,  and  there  is  a  business  imperaGve   underlying  the  effort.*   *Text  paraphrased  from  a  blog  post        by  Mark  Rosenthal  (The  Lean  Thinker)  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 17   In  addiGon  to  its  Lean  experGse,  the  Lean  army   should  acquire  coaching-­‐level  proficiency   in  an  Improvement  Kata  and  Coaching  Kata   In  order  to  effecGvely  coach  middle  managers  the  Lean  army   needs  more  than  technical  Lean  experGse.    We  also  need  to  be   able  to  coach  managers  on  how  to  guide  their  teams  through  a   systemaGc,  scienGfic  process  for  achieving  challenging  goals,   which  in  turn  makes  the  manager  successful.   SECOND  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 18   It's  Coaching  the  Coach   Once  a  Lean  Staff  Person  develops  enough  skill  themselves  with   the  Improvement  Kata  and  Coaching  Kata,  they  observe  coaching   cycles  between  a  manager  and  learner  and  help  the  manager   develop  their  coaching  skill.  This  role  is  called  the  “Second  Coach.”    
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 19   Let’s  adjust  our  terminology  to  beier  align   with  the  language  of  managers.    Some  examples:   "Developing   People"   This  doesn’t  excite  managers   because  there’s  no   connec<on  to  tangible   results.  Since  employees   easily  move  to  other   companies  it  also  means  we   may  be  training  and   benefi;ng  our  compe<tors.   Don’t  Say  This   Why   "Make  teams  bePer   at  achieving  goals   and  meeBng   challenges"   Say  This  Instead   "PDCA”     "ExperimenBng”     "Be  more   accepBng  of   failures"   These  phrases  sound  bad   to  managers  because  it   seems  like  their  teams   will  never  reach  the  goal.   "Iterate  rapidly   toward  a   measureable  goal   with  an  achieve-­‐by   date"   THIRD  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 20   This  is  a  change  in  semanGcs,  not  intent,   that  can  help  to  evolve  the  Lean  Army's  thinking     The  idea  is  to  adjust  how  we  express  and  label  the  thinking   to  be]er  suit  the  mindset  and  experience  of  our  customer.   We're  s<ll  talking  about  developing  the  capabili<es  of   people  (through  coaching  at  all  levels)  but  doing  so  by   saying  that  using  a  good  process  of  coaching  has  the   inten<on  of  making  a  team  be]er  at  something  the   manager  cares  about:    Achieving  goals.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 21   CONCLUSION   The  Lean  staff  should  operate  on   and  through  middle  managers,   not  apply  Lean  to  processes   separately  from  them.  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 22   Managers   Staff  leads  Lean  ac<vi<es     through  applying  Lean   tools  and  techniques  in   periodic  workshops,   projects  and  training.   Managers  verbally   support  Lean,  but  keep   managing  as  usual.   Staff  develops  and  supports  middle   managers  through  coaching:     -­‐    Teach  middle  managers  the        Improvement  Kata  and  Coaching        Kata  pa]erns  through  prac<ce.     -­‐    Provide  Lean  tools  exper<se  as        needed  to  reach  manager’s  goals.   Current  Roles   Target  Roles   Proposed  emphasis   Managers  coach  their  teams  daily  in   prac<cing  an  Improvement  Kata  and   using  Lean  techniques  to  achieve   goals  and  meet  challenges.   Current  emphasis   in  Lean   The  Lean   Staff   A  SHIFT  IN  FOCUS  
    • © Mike Rother THE LEAN ARMY 23   Shiqing  focus  to  coaching  managers   is  a  great  opportunity  and  role   for  the  well-­‐trained  Lean  army  to  play!   We  in  the  Lean  army  tell  our  students  that  PDCA  and   Change  are  difficult  but  necessary.    It  will  be  interesGng  to   see  how  we  apply  that  kind  of  PDCA  to  our  own  efforts.   Imagine  the  potenGal  for  Lean  transformaGon  if  the   Lean  army  reposiGons  to  coach  middle  managers.