• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
television broadcasting history
 

television broadcasting history

on

  • 11,441 views

televison broadcasting history

televison broadcasting history

Statistics

Views

Total Views
11,441
Views on SlideShare
11,430
Embed Views
11

Actions

Likes
5
Downloads
305
Comments
0

5 Embeds 11

http://www.slideshare.net 6
http://bbtest 2
http://bbsandbox.palomar.edu 1
http://mediago.groupsite.com 1
https://ualearn.blackboard.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    television broadcasting history television broadcasting history Presentation Transcript

    • Company LOGO
    • Television Fever in the 1930s NBC began experimental broadcasts in New York in 1932 David Sarnoff announced RCA was ready to investment $1-million in TV In 1939 NBC began regular service, starting off with the World’s Fair Other Networks: CBS (1939) & DuMont (1940) FCC Authorized commercial TV beginning on July 1, 1941 WNBT (NY) became 1st commercial station with 15 hours of programming a week
    • Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941 NBC Red Network - Sammy Kaye's Sunday Serenade with Sammy and his Orchestra, Tommy Ryan, Alan Foster, and the Three Kaydettes. KDKA., Pittsburgh, PA 4:30 P.M. Seattle Station issues emergency instructions for the evening
    • Development Slowed
    • World War II Improvements in TV came to abrupt halt. Defense Communications Board stopped construction of stations Existing TV stations used for defense related programming Only 6 stations on air, broadcasting a few irregular hours a day Fewer than 10,000 receivers.
    • Korean War At end of war, corporations ready to advertise goods Consumers with savings ready to spend AT & T constructed intercity coaxial cable links FCC ready to license stations after war 1945 - NBC network to Philadelphia, New York, & Schenectady 1948 -- 36 TV stations on air & 70 under construction Because of interference, FCC declared a freeze Korean war prolonged freeze
    • Continuing Improvement • 1951 – Cable across U.S. % of U.S Families with TV sets • Magnetic 100 videotape late 80 ’50s (live 60 programming/re 40 runs 20 • Price of sets 0 1953 1960 • falling •b
    • The Boom is On FCC Lifted its freeze in 1952 Existing VHF channels (2 – 13) supplemented with VHF (14 – 83) Backlog of 700 applications – 175 granted 1953 – 377 stations on air
    • Filling the Hours Transferred about 24 popular programs from radio The smash was Texaco Star Theater with comedian Milton Berle - 1948 Major stimulus for purchase of sets in 1948 & 1949. Presidential Campaign of 52 (Eisenhower v Stevenson) was a hit also
    • Movies • Studios wanted nothing to do with TV • Eventually saw market potential • By 1954, studios start producing shows • By 1956 selling rights to old feature films • During Korean War attendance dropped 20% to 40% • Dozens of theaters closed
    • News • Like radio at first • Ampex made first practical videotape machine in 1956 • 1963 is the year of change
    • Color TV • CBS Began limited broadcasting in color in 1951 • RCAQ system approved in 1954, • Expensive ($1,000 at first) • 1965 – 15% of stations able to broadcast in color
    • Living Room War • Vietnam (’61-75) • Could film almost anything • Stressed success & value at first • Images told another story • Tet Offensive of ’68, a turning point
    • Tet Offensive 1968