Tribe: Chimeric or Polymorphic? Peter T. Suzuki   Stud. Tribes Tribals,  2(2): 113-118 (2004)
In computer terminology,  polymorphic code   is code that uses a polymorphic engine to mutate while keeping the original a...
Historically, tribe was used to designate The Other, especially during colonial expansion. This phenomenon, however, was n...
  <ul><li>One of the clearest definitions and delineations of tribe that I have come across happens to be in a book by two...
Common Geography <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Consciousness of Unity <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Common Language <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Endogamous Group <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Ties of Blood Relationship <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Need for Protection <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Political Organization <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Importance of Religion <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Common Name <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Common Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Organization of Clans <ul><li>  </li></ul>
Tribes
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Tribes

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Tribes

  1. 1. Tribe: Chimeric or Polymorphic? Peter T. Suzuki   Stud. Tribes Tribals, 2(2): 113-118 (2004)
  2. 2. THE KHIMAIRA (or Chimera) was a monstrous beast which ravaged the countryside of Lykia in Anatolia. It was a composite creature, with the body and maned head of a lion, a goat's head rising from its back, a set of goat-udders, and a serpentine tail. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  3. 3. In computer terminology, polymorphic code is code that uses a polymorphic engine to mutate while keeping the original algorithm intact. That is, the code changes itself each time it runs, but the function of the code (its semantics) will not change at all. This technique is sometimes used by computer viruses, shellcodes and computer worms to hide their presence. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  4. 4. Historically, tribe was used to designate The Other, especially during colonial expansion. This phenomenon, however, was not restricted to Western colonialism/imperialism in that non-Western empires have used its equivalent to designate those not of their kind. This labeling appears to be a human universal because of simple contact (e.g., the Algonkian Cree and Abenaki Indians in labeling the Inuits Eskimos) or by conquest. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  5. 5.   <ul><li>One of the clearest definitions and delineations of tribe that I have come across happens to be in a book by two Indian social anthropologists who authored a textbook that was widely used in India as an introduction to the field. It is Ram Nath Sharma and Rajendra K. Sharma's Social Anthropology and Indian Tribes (1983). They characterize tribes as having these eleven features:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>definite common geography; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>consciousness of unity;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>common language; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>endogamous group;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ties of blood relationship;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>experience of need for protection; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>political organization;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>importance of religion; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>common name;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>common culture; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>organization of clans </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Common Geography <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  7. 7. Consciousness of Unity <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  8. 8. Common Language <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  9. 9. Endogamous Group <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  10. 10. Ties of Blood Relationship <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  11. 11. Need for Protection <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  12. 12. Political Organization <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  13. 13. Importance of Religion <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  14. 14. Common Name <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  15. 15. Common Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul>
  16. 16. Organization of Clans <ul><li>  </li></ul>

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