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The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
The Case for Crappy eLearning
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The Case for Crappy eLearning

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Kevin Gumienny, MicroAssist's eLearning Team Lead's presentation at eLearning Symposium 2014 in Austin, Texas. Kevin discussed what makes eLearning crappy, how to make it better with blowing the …

Kevin Gumienny, MicroAssist's eLearning Team Lead's presentation at eLearning Symposium 2014 in Austin, Texas. Kevin discussed what makes eLearning crappy, how to make it better with blowing the budget. He recommends resources such as the Serious eLearning Manifesto, Jesse Schell’s Art of Game Design.David Michael’s Serious Games: Games That Educate, Train, and Inform, The Non-Designer Design Book, Presentation Zen, Slide:ology, Thinking with Type,

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  • Firm believer in Steven Covey. Always begin with the end in mind.

    The sooner I get done designing elearning, the sooner I can be here.
  • The Serious eLearning Manifesto. Cathy Moore’s Connect with Haji Kamal. Dirksen’s brilliant ideas in Design for How People Learn.

    With these tools, books, and examples, you can create elearning that transcends good to become great.

    That’s not what we’re going to talk about today.
  • We’re going to talk about crappy elearning.

    The stuff you don’t have the freedom, time, or money to make great.

    The times you’re given a set of documentation or an instructor-led session and charged with converting it to online training.
  • Some definitions.

    Classic definition is a page-turner. See content, set through someone reading it to you, and then clicking next.

    Ethan Edwards: Read this, click next. Read this, click next. Read this, click next. And then take a test.
  • Can’t progress at your own pace. Need to wait for narration to finish—or next button doesn’t appear until a specific time has passed.
  • Splash screen for branding.

    Navigation tutorial

    List of objectives

    Evaluation plan

    Now start learning
  • Everything that some one thinks you might need to know.

    A special danger when you’re converting instructor-led training to elearning.
  • Easily answered without reading the material.

    Hardly challenging, and makes the training seem irrelevant.
  • We’re primarily visual creatures, and online training is a heavily visual medium
  • Time
    Money
    Timing Requirements
    Regulations
    Customer expectations
    Comparable to competition

    People hate it.

    It’s ineffective. When people hate it, they don’t learn the material. Among other things, we do safety training. Page-turners may satisfy a requirement, but the point of the requirement is not to memorize a requirement. It’s how to do something safely. People miss that, injury or death.

    If you have to do it, you have to do it. But they’re not going to recommend it, and your audience won’t grow.

    And every time these shortcuts are taken, it creates the expectation that all elearning is crappy. It creates the need for a Serious Eearning Manifesto.

    Crappy eLearning is fast and cheap. But not good for learners or business.
  • How do I do fast and cheap and make it interactive?

    We’re making better elearning, not the best elearning.
  • People skim online text, they don’t read it.

    Print prose designed for sequential readers, start at beginning and move to the end.

    Online text relies on smaller chunks, which may not be encountered in order. This is how people may read the course, whether or not it’s intended.
  • Give your learners freedom.

    Sometimes you can’t. But when you can, do it. We all like control.

    Not measuring how long they sit in front of the screen.

    Measuring whether or not they’ve mastered the objectives. And the measure of this is in the evaluation, not in the content.

    Write good questions and let people test out.
  • Then how to make locked interesting?
    Scenarios
    Narrative
    Stories
  • Regardless of whether your course has locked or unlocked navigation, you need good questions. This is where mastery is determined. It’s all about the evaluation.

    Here’re a few suggestions from Cathy Moore.
  • Pleasant design is good, but don’t reinvent the wheel.

    Doesn’t need to be elaborate, just simple and clean.

    Look at website design to get ideas.

    Kuhlman: Better to have good-looking bad elearning than bad-looking bad elearning.
  • That’s a way to deal with the user experience.

    Now what about production—managers, clients, everyone wants it faster.
  • They’ll take time off of work, stop by, chat a bit, and share.
  • Tale of showing part of this course to an organization of municipal utility workers. Nodding along whenever the fatal facts came along.

    Stories are emotional glue, connects the audience to the message.

    They make people care (even if it’s surprise at stupidity).

    Stories are motivating, especially in real life. Stories need to be relevant.

    Yesterday I saw two posts on stories.

    An article in Time by Eric Barker, pointing out the power of stories to motivate people in a work environment. If it works to motivate people to give their all at work, it works to get them to change their behavoir, which is the purpose of learning.

    Post by Cammy Bean on using stories to place compliance training in real-life contexts, making it interesting.
  • Put the learner in a story.

    Waste, fraud, and abuse example.

    Can have an entire course of questions—don’t keep them in the quiz.
  • Mock-up of course on accident awareness for bus drivers
  • Pump service brake
  • Games allow you a safe place to fail.
  • Click rear brake problem
  • Note that the pull info (Youtube about how air bus brakes work) is highlighted.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Case for Crappy elearning
    • 2. Great elearning
    • 3. Crappy elearning
    • 4. Let’s start with a definition
    • 5. Locked navigation
    • 6. Lots of pre-learning material
    • 7. Too much content American environmentalism dawned as a popular movement on a mild spring afternoon in 1970. Wednesday, April 22nd, brought blue skies, light breezes, and temperatures in the 60s to New York City and Washington, D.C. Much of the rest of the country enjoyed similar conditions. On that day, the influence of nature had particular meaning; the nation held a celebration of clean air, land, and water. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 1 Hazardous Waste Management The first Earth Day may have been prompted, in part, by the recent moon landings. When the astronauts turned their cameras homeward, capturing the image of a delicate blue planet, the world looked upon itself with fresh understanding. The context of Earth Day 1970, however, was far from celestial, reflecting the turbulence of the time. The History of the EPA, Page 2 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 3 Yet Earth Day, forged in an era of strife and change, had its own personality; marijuana smoke may have hung in wisps over some of the day's festivities, but violence and confrontation were nowhere to be seen. In America's largest city, Mayor John V. Lindsey decided to commemorate the day in high style, closing traffic for two hours on Fifth Avenue, from 14th Street to Central Park. Along its broad path, multitudes choked the streets and sidewalks. Much of the crowd's interest centered on Union Square, a crossroads of political ferment during the 1930s. This day, "many more than" 100,000 onlookers saw teach-ins, lectures, and a non-stop frisbee game at the famous intersection. An ecological Mardi Gras lasting from noon to midnight sprang up along 14th Street from Third to Seventh Avenues. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 4 While folksinger Odetta sang "We Shall Overcome," a rock band played the Beatles' anthem, "Power to the People." In Washington, D.C., Congress suspended business as most of its members, regardless of ideology, felt compelled to appear before their constituents. President Nixon kept a regular schedule at the White House. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 5 While Earth Day launched the idea of environmentalism in its present sense, the realization of the value of wilderness and an appreciation of the consequences of its destruction dates back several centuries in America. For example, as early as 1652, the city of Boston established a public water supply, a step followed in the next century by several towns in Pennsylvania. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 6 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 7 By 1800, 17 municipalities had taken similar measures to protect their citizens against unfit drinking sources. Still, anyone living in the great cities of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston, and Boston just after the American revolution could not escape the ill-effects of expanding urbanization: the stench of sewage in near- by rivers; the unwholesome presence of animal and human wastes underfoot; the odors of rotting food; the jangling shouts of vendors in narrow lanes; and the constant grinding of hooves and iron wagon wheels on unpaved streets. Industrialism in the nineteenth century widened the impact of environmental degradation. Literary people were the first to sense the meaning of this trend. Herman Melville's epic novel Moby Dick (1851) and Henry David Thoreau's Walden, or Life in the Woods (1854. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 8 A second generation of writers, perhaps sobered by the final settlement of the American West, wrote without fictional guise. John Burroughs published 27 volumes of intimate, experiential nature essays. John Muir, the Scottish prophet of the rugged outdoors, set down his observations in a series of books, beginning with The Mountains of California in 1894. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 9 Hazardous Waste Management President Theodore Roosevelt, who undertook a western camping trip with Muir in 1903, came to symbolize the campaign for conservation, which gained steadily in political popularity. During and after his Administration, the use and retention of natural resources became a preoccupation of government. The History of the EPA, Page 10 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 11 President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal enacted a number of natural resource measures. The Soil Conservation Service, founded in 1935, applied scientific practices to reduce the erosion of agricultural land. The depletion of animal life received recognition in the passage of the 1937 Pittman-Robertson Act, establishing a fund for state fish and wildlife programs from the proceeds of federal taxes on hunting. Most ambitious of all, the Tennessee Valley Authority erected nine dams and a string of massive generating stations. The definition of wilderness as an immense natural storehouse, subject to human management, changed after the Second World War. Life on the battle front, as well as the home front, curbed the country's appetite for colossal federal projects. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 12
    • 8. Bad Questions Disease-causing microorganisms are called ________. a. paladins b. pathogens c. pandas d. pantaloons Do not smoke in a ________ atmosphere. a. flammable b. flamboyant c. flaming d. fusible An effective safety session does which of the following? (Select all that apply.) a. teaches or reviews basic safety concepts and practice b. has doughnuts c. shows gory accident pictures to scare people into being safe d. is a waste of time
    • 9. Ugly
    • 10. Reasons to Do It TimeMoneyComparable to CompetitionTiming RequirementsRegulationsCustomer ExpectationsPeople hate it.
    • 11. Better elearning
    • 12. No Blocks of Text People skim large blocks of text. As annoying as it might be for someone designing a course, putting a large block of text on the screen more or less ensures that it won’t be read. Now, you can have it read to them to compensate, but then we’re right back where we began. Instead, it’s better to use smaller chunks, quick reads. This should be easier if you’re able to design using scenarios and stories, but even if you’re moving large blocks of text from a book to the screen, you can summarize, place it over a series of slides, or even use word balloons and scatter them over the screen.
    • 13. Unlock navigation
    • 14. If it must be locked
    • 15. Start right away
    • 16. Do they need to know it to meet the objectives? Get rid of content American environmentalism dawned as a popular movement on a mild spring afternoon in 1970. Wednesday, April 22nd, brought blue skies, light breezes, and temperatures in the 60s to New York City and Washington, D.C. Much of the rest of the country enjoyed similar conditions. On that day, the influence of nature had particular meaning; the nation held a celebration of clean air, land, and water. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 1 Hazardous Waste Management The first Earth Day may have been prompted, in part, by the recent moon landings. When the astronauts turned their cameras homeward, capturing the image of a delicate blue planet, the world looked upon itself with fresh understanding. The context of Earth Day 1970, however, was far from celestial, reflecting the turbulence of the time. The History of the EPA, Page 2 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 3 Yet Earth Day, forged in an era of strife and change, had its own personality; marijuana smoke may have hung in wisps over some of the day's festivities, but violence and confrontation were nowhere to be seen. In America's largest city, Mayor John V. Lindsey decided to commemorate the day in high style, closing traffic for two hours on Fifth Avenue, from 14th Street to Central Park. Along its broad path, multitudes choked the streets and sidewalks. Much of the crowd's interest centered on Union Square, a crossroads of political ferment during the 1930s. This day, "many more than" 100,000 onlookers saw teach-ins, lectures, and a non-stop frisbee game at the famous intersection. An ecological Mardi Gras lasting from noon to midnight sprang up along 14th Street from Third to Seventh Avenues. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 4 While folksinger Odetta sang "We Shall Overcome," a rock band played the Beatles' anthem, "Power to the People." In Washington, D.C., Congress suspended business as most of its members, regardless of ideology, felt compelled to appear before their constituents. President Nixon kept a regular schedule at the White House. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 5 While Earth Day launched the idea of environmentalism in its present sense, the realization of the value of wilderness and an appreciation of the consequences of its destruction dates back several centuries in America. For example, as early as 1652, the city of Boston established a public water supply, a step followed in the next century by several towns in Pennsylvania. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 6 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 7 By 1800, 17 municipalities had taken similar measures to protect their citizens against unfit drinking sources. Still, anyone living in the great cities of New York, Philadelphia, Charleston, and Boston just after the American revolution could not escape the ill-effects of expanding urbanization: the stench of sewage in near- by rivers; the unwholesome presence of animal and human wastes underfoot; the odors of rotting food; the jangling shouts of vendors in narrow lanes; and the constant grinding of hooves and iron wagon wheels on unpaved streets. Industrialism in the nineteenth century widened the impact of environmental degradation. Literary people were the first to sense the meaning of this trend. Herman Melville's epic novel Moby Dick (1851) and Henry David Thoreau's Walden, or Life in the Woods (1854. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 8 A second generation of writers, perhaps sobered by the final settlement of the American West, wrote without fictional guise. John Burroughs published 27 volumes of intimate, experiential nature essays. John Muir, the Scottish prophet of the rugged outdoors, set down his observations in a series of books, beginning with The Mountains of California in 1894. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 9 Hazardous Waste Management President Theodore Roosevelt, who undertook a western camping trip with Muir in 1903, came to symbolize the campaign for conservation, which gained steadily in political popularity. During and after his Administration, the use and retention of natural resources became a preoccupation of government. The History of the EPA, Page 10 Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 11 President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal enacted a number of natural resource measures. The Soil Conservation Service, founded in 1935, applied scientific practices to reduce the erosion of agricultural land. The depletion of animal life received recognition in the passage of the 1937 Pittman-Robertson Act, establishing a fund for state fish and wildlife programs from the proceeds of federal taxes on hunting. Most ambitious of all, the Tennessee Valley Authority erected nine dams and a string of massive generating stations. The definition of wilderness as an immense natural storehouse, subject to human management, changed after the Second World War. Life on the battle front, as well as the home front, curbed the country's appetite for colossal federal projects. Hazardous Waste Management The History of the EPA, Page 12
    • 17. Write good questions When is “All of the above” the correct answer? a. With alarming regularity b. When we try to cover too much in one question c. When we use a question to teach instead of assess d. All of the above http://blog.cathy-moore.com/2007/08/can-you-answer-these-6- questions-about-multiple-choice-questions/ We can confuse learners when we: a. fail to actually complete the sentence we started in the question. b. inconsistent grammar in the options. c. sometimes we veer off into another idea entirely. d. wombats.
    • 18. Make it pretty
    • 19. Let’s speed up development a bit…
    • 20. Find common mistakes Connie Malamed http://theelearningcoach.com/
    • 21. Get rid of voice-over
    • 22. Don’t get fancy
    • 23. Storyboard it
    • 24. Maybe we can even engage the learner…
    • 25. Information’s not always the point ! ! ! !P P P Pi i i i i Cathy Moore http://blog.cathy-moore.com/2008/05/be-an-elearning-action-hero/
    • 26. 65% of deaths in confined spaces are due to air quality problems. Use stories give meaning to data
    • 27. Stewart F. House/Special Contributor to Dallas Morning News Use stories give meaning to data
    • 28. Texas Engineering Extension Service People share stories
    • 29. Incorporate stories into learning
    • 30. Use scenarios to put them in the story
    • 31. Let them learn from a game
    • 32. The low air pressure warning light comes on and you hear a warning buzz. One of the air pressure gauges reads 80 psi. What do you do? Pump the service brake to help stop the bus. Press the service brake to stop the bus. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes.
    • 33. The pressure gauge moves rapidly to 0. You have lost all air pressure. You lose control and crash into the car ahead of you. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes. Bus Crashes Into Car Car Driver Dead, Four Students Injured. Start Route Over
    • 34. When you pressed the brakes, you heard the hissing noise again. The light is still lit and the buzzer is still going. The gauge now reads 40 psi. If it’s the front brakes, you have time to find a good stopping place. If it’s the rear, you need to pull over NOW. The sound indicates a front brake problem. The sound indicates a rear brake problem. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes.
    • 35. No, the sound is not indicative of a problem with the rear brake. You may wish to review the air brake diagnosis techniques in the glove box. Try again. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes.
    • 36. You’re right! You’re able to navigate safely to the side of the road. You call into dispatch, and another bus arrives to take the students safely home. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes.
    • 37. You’re right! You’re able to navigate safely to the side of the road. You call into dispatch, and another bus arrives to take the students safely home. Tell me more about diagnosing problems with air brakes.
    • 38. But make sure they are relevant
    • 39. But make sure they are relevant
    • 40. Don’t reinvent the wheel
    • 41. In general…
    • 42. Use the tools
    • 43. But remember the power of limits
    • 44. And always steal from the best http://elearningmanifesto.org/trustees/
    • 45. Phone: 512-794-8440 Email: kgumienny@microassist.com Discussion

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