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Presentation on Colorado IMTs and how they can assist during an incident.

Presentation on Colorado IMTs and how they can assist during an incident.

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    1 im ts in colorado emsac november 2011 powerpoint presentation 1 im ts in colorado emsac november 2011 powerpoint presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Incident Management Teams In Colorado Daniel Hatlestad, Paramedic EMS Captain Inter-Canyon Fire/Rescue Information Officer, Type 2 Jefferson County IMT Colorado Team 1 EMSAC November 2011 Southwest Colorado IMT
    • IMTs in Colorado Objectives Incident Command System Structure IMTs in Colorado National Incident Management System History Of the Incident Command System EMS and ICS: Working with IMTs
    • NIMS Objectives National Incident Management System
    • National Response Plan (NRP)
      • Issued February 28, 2003, Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD-5), called for the creation of a National Response Plan (NRP) to “integrate Federal Government domestic prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery plans into one all-discipline, all-hazards plan ”.
      • The purpose of the NRP is to enhance the ability of the United States to prepare for and to manage domestic incidents by establishing a single, comprehensive national approach.
    • National Incident Management System (NIMS)
      • Under the NRP, a National Incident Management System (NIMS) will be developed to provide a consistent nationwide framework to standardize incident management practices and procedures to ensure that Federal, State, and local governments can work effectively and efficiently together to prepare for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity.
      • NIMS adopted the basic tenets of the Incident Command System (ICS) as its foundation.
    • History of ICS Objectives History Of the Incident Command System
    • Incident Command System
      • ICS is a well organized , team approach for managing critical incidents . It has the following hallmarks:
        • Manageable Span of Control
        • Common Terminology
        • Modular/Scalable Organization
        • Integrated Communications
        • Unified Command Structure
        • Consolidated Action Plans
        • Pre-designated Command Centers
        • Comprehensive Resource Management
    • Incident Command System History
      • The Incident command System (ICS) was developed in response to a series of fires in Southern California in the early 1970s by an interagency effort called FIRESCOPE.
    • ICS Based in Wildfire
      • ICS was designed to manage rapidly moving wildfires and to address reoccurring problems:
        • Too many people reporting to one supervisor
        • Different emergency response organizational structure
        • Lack of reliable incident information
        • Inadequate and incompatible communications
    • While the ICS was designed to manage rapidly moving wildfires, the system has been widely adopted by many public service agencies/NIMS/FEMA for response to disasters of all kinds ICS Adaptation
    • ICS Structure Objectives Incident Command System Structure
    • ICS Essential Requirements
      • The designers of ICS had four essential requirements:
      • The system must be organizationally flexible to meet the needs of incidents of any kind and size .
      • Agencies must be able to use the system on a day-to-day basis as well as for major emergencies .
      • The system must be sufficiently standardized to allow personnel from a variety of agencies and diverse geographic locations to rapidly meld into a common management structure .
      • The system must be cost effective .
    • Goals of ICS
      • Local, state, federal cooperation
      • Interagency coordination
      • Enhanced communication
      • Interoperability
      • Unified command
      • Personnel accountability
      • Operational effectiveness
      • Citizen and Responder safety
      • Use existing capabilities/competencies
    • Incident Command System – Modular Organization
      • Organizational structure…
      • Develops top-down, from first-in unit.
      • Is based on incident’s management needs.
      • Is always staffed with a designated IC; other functions staffed as needed.
      • Capable of rapid expansion to meet the needs of the authorizing agency.
    • Incident Command System Incident Commander Command Information Safety Liaison Command Staff Operations Planning Logistics Finance General Staff
      • COMMAND
      • Has incident responsibility event
      • Command Staff includes Information, Safety & Liaison
      • OPERATIONS
      • Directs all resources
      • Conducts tactical operations
      • PLANNING
      • Develops the action plan to accomplish the objective
      • LOGISTICS
      • Provides support to meet incident needs
      • FINANCE/ADMINISTRATION
      • Monitors costs, time and procurement related to incident
    • ICS Organization BRANCH DIVISIONS & GROUPS BRANCH GROUP STRIKE TEAMS & TASK FORCES RESOURCES UNIT SITUATION UNIT DEMOBILIZATION UNIT DOCUMENTATION UNIT INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION UNIT TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS TIME UNIT PROCUREMENT UNIT COMPENSATION COST UNIT SERVICE BRANCH COMMUNICATIONS MEDICAL FOOD SUPPORT BRANCH SUPPLY FACILITIES GROUND SUPPORT COMMAND OPERATIONS LOGISTICS PLANNING FINANCE PIO SAFETY LIAISON RESOURCES
    • The Incident Management Team
      • An IMT is an overhead team consisting of the Command and General Staff positions of the ICS organization. A scalable group of specially trained & experienced individuals who work with the existing organization for the command, control, coordination, support and/or management of the incident organization & resources with maximum effectiveness, efficiency, and safety.
      • Need:
      • Any incident which exceeds the capabilities of local resources
      • Any incident expanding beyond Operations
      • Any incident lasting longer than one operational period
    • The Planning “P”
      • Command manages the organization whereas Operations manages the incident.
      • Subsequently, the IMT focuses on assisting with the management of the organization.
      • Planning for each operational period (typically 12 hours) is a critical function of the IMT.
      • The Plans group produces the Incident Action Plan (IAP).
      Incident/Threat Notification Initial Response & Assessment Agency Administrator Briefing (If Appropriate) Incident Briefing ICS 201 Initial UC Meeting (If Unified Command) IC/UC Sets Initial Incident Objectives Initial Strategy Meeting & Information Sharing Information Gathering & Sharing Initial Response IC/UC Validate or Adjust Objectives Strategy Meeting If Objectives Adjusted Execute Plan & Assess Progress Begin Operational Period Operational Period Briefing IAP Preparation & Approval Planning Meeting Preparing for Planning Meeting Tactics Meeting Information Gathering and Sharing Information Gathering and Sharing
    • The Incident Action Plan Management by Objectives All levels of a growing ICS organization must have a clear understanding of the functional actions required to manage the incident. Management by objectives is an approach used to communicate actions throughout the entire ICS organization. It can be accomplished through the Incident Action Plan, which includes the following steps: Step 1: Understand agency policy and direction. Step 2: Assess incident situation. Step 3: Establish incident objectives. Step 4: Select appropriate strategy or strategies to achieve objectives. Step 5: Perform tactical direction (applying tactics appropriate to the strategy, assigning the resources, and monitoring performance). Step 6: Provide necessary followup (changing strategy or tactics, adding or subtracting resources, etc.).
    • National or State level National or State level State or metro area level City or county level Single incident level Incident Management Team Types
    • Types 1 IMTs – 35-50 members A self-contained, all-hazard or wildland team recognized at the National and State level, coordinated through the State, Geographic Area Coordination Center, or National Interagency Fire Center. Multiple operational periods Written Incident Action Plan Incident Personnel > 500
      • California (5)
      • Pacific NW (2)
      • Alaska
      • Northern Rockies (2)
      • Great Basin (2)
      • Rocky Mountain
      • Southwest (2)
      • Southern (2)
      • NIMO (2)
    • Type 2 IMTs – 20-35 members A self-contained, all-hazard or wildland team recognized at the National and State level, coordinated through the State, Geographic Area Coordination Center, or National Interagency Fire Center. Multiple operational periods Written IAP Incident Personnel < 500 Approximately 35 Nationally certified Type 2 teams in the U.S.
    • Type 3 IMTs – 12-20 members State or Regional multi-agency/ multi-jurisdiction team for extended incidents May be used at incidents such as a tornado touchdown, wildfires, earthquake, flood, multi-day hostage/standoff situation, or at large planned events. 2+ operational periods Written IAP Colorado currently has three certified Type 3 teams and additional teams are working toward certification by the state.
    • Type 4 IMT – 7-10 members A single and/or multi-agency team for expanded incidents, typically formed and managed at the city, township or county level or by a pre-determined local or regional entity. 1 operational period No written Incident Action Plan Commonly formed during mutual aid responses with Command staff from many organizations.
    • Type 5 IMTs – 2-5 members Often a discipline specific response (i.e. fire, law) of 2-5 command level officers that provide the Incident Commander with support (command mutual aid). 1 operational period No written Incident Action Plan Type 5 teams typically take shape when an individual identifies themselves as Incident Command.
    • What is an All-Hazards Incident Management Team?
      • Designed to serve not only in wildfires, but in all major incidents, an AHIMT is a team comprised of:
      • Personnel from single or multiple agencies and jurisdictions
      • Community resources
      • Law enforcement, fire, EMS, public health, schools heathcare facilities, industry
    • When to begin thinking about calling the IMT
      • You may run into a second operational period
      • You have more resources than you normally manage or feel comfortable safely managing.
      • You have heavy media attention.
      • You are activating multiple mutual aid operational assets, you automatically have:
          • Commensurate overhead needs
          • Increased resource accountability demand
          • Increased communication demands
          • Increased documentation requirements
          • Increased risks
    • When can an IMT be used?
      • May be used in…
      • Planned events
      • Emergencies
      • Disasters (natural, human-made, etc.)
      • Classified / Sensitive / High Visibility situations
    • Tornado
      • 2,000+ Injured…
      • 600 Structures destroyed, including the local hospital, 1500+ homes and businesses damaged
      • Neighboring Counties also damaged – mutual aid not available.
    • Hazardous Materials
      • Is your system prepared to:
        • Operate for 5-10 days?
        • Evacuate 3,000+ citizens?
        • Support 20+ Mutual Aid Fire Departments, ambulances, Haz-Mat units for several days?
        • Supply 300+ gallons of fuel per hour?
        • Assemble 50+ EMS units?
    • Floods
      • 200+ Injured…
      • 300 Structures destroyed, including the fire station, police department, 1500+ homes and businesses damaged
      • Neighboring Counties also damaged – mutual aid not available.
    • Major Building Collapse
      • Do you have a Plan…
      • First 5 minutes?
      • First 3 hours?
      • First 6 hours?
      • Multiple operational periods for search, rescue and recovery?
    • MCI with prolonged Operations
      • How many responders can you quickly assemble?
      • Could you request 30 - 50 ambulances?
    • Disease Outbreak
      • Cannot be managed with local resources
        • Multiple patients
        • Special hazards
          • Chemical
          • Radiological
          • Biological
        • Mass Immunizations
        • Evacuations
        • Prolonged recovery
    • Blizzards
      • Local resources may be unable to respond
        • Evacuation of healthcare facilities
        • Transport
          • Food
          • Fuel
          • Medication
        • Animal feeding
        • Mobilization of state resources
        • Snow removal
    • IMTs in Colorado Objectives IMTs in Colorado
    • Colorado Type III IMTs
      • Type 3 IMTs in Colorado:
      • Are certified by the Colorado Division of Fire Safety
      • Have multiple staff in each position
      • Have members qualified at Type 3, 2 and 1 positions
      • Work together to staff large incidents
      • Are deployed to assist other states with large incidents
    • Colorado Type III IMTs This initiative is designed to: Strategically locate teams throughout the state. Provide incident management for state level disasters. Management of an incident until arrival of Type 1 or 2 team. Prepare team personnel for all-hazard incidents. Deploy IMT personnel when local jurisdictions are overwhelmed or incidents with a prolonged operational periods.
    • Colorado IMTs
      • Colorado is a recognized national leader in the development and utilization of Type III All-Hazards Incident Management Teams. The teams include members from law enforcement, EMS, fire, public health, school systems, and industry. The teams have in-depth coverage of all command positions - allowing for prolonged assignments.
      • The teams have been deployed during the blizzards in SE Colorado, Alamosa Salmonella outbreak, Windsor tornado, DNC convention, the Rainbow Family gathering on U.S.F.S. property and various wildland fires throughout Colorado.
      Southwest Colorado IMT
    • Activation of the Colorado IMTs
      • Activation of the IMT by local agency - Contact CDEM
      • Type of Incident
      • Support needed
      • Location of incident
      • Extent of incident
      • Contact names, phone numbers
      • Confirmation of team response within minutes
    • What will the IMT want from me?
      • ICS 201-type information
        • What resources are on the scene
        • Where are the resources
        • What is the current organization
        • What is the current situation
          • Objectives & Strategies
        • Scene sketch, if available
      • The IMT will want to know who it works for (AHJ) and what its assignments are (Delegation of Authority).
      • The Delegation of Authority is critical as it outlines resources, finances, goals, limitations, and constraints. The Delegation of Authority requires politicians.
    • Transition to the IMT
      • The IMT responds with:
      • Overhead management team with trained and skilled multi-service Command and General staff.
      • Communications equipment and van for multi-system radio links.
      • Self-supporting offices.
    • What will the IMT do upon arrival?
      • Immediate Actions
      • Check in with Incident Commander
      • Receive briefing from Incident Command
      • The IMT will brief and assign their staff
      • Establish IMT objectives that support the mission as assigned by the IC
      • Support & fortify Resources Management
      • Support & fortify Communications
      • Support & Fortify Responder Health & Safety
      • Support & fortify the Planning Cycle
    • Transition from Local to IMT
      • Transition is the most challenging and dangerous time
      • Delegation of Authority from Agency Having Jurisdiction (AJD)
      • Identification of Resources in the field and at the Incident Command Post
      • Communications plan
      • Integration of IMT with local resources
      • Transfer of command occurs when:
        • Typically at the beginning of an Operational Period
        • The incident situation changes over time, resulting in a legal requirement to change command.
        • There is normal turnover of personnel on extended incidents.
        • The incident response is concluded and responsibility is transferred to the home agency.
      Transfer of Command
    • Command Structures
      • Single Command
        • One commander for entire incident
        • Works well for:
          • Short duration incidents
          • Limited jurisdictions
        • Does not work well for:
          • Overlapping responsibilities
          • Overlapping jurisdictions
          • Incidents that evolve over time
      • Unified Command
        • Agency command personnel unify
        • Right agency at right time
        • Stimulates cooperation
        • Provides for balanced decision-making
        • Maintains
          • Adequate span of control
          • Unity of command
    • Unified Command – Local and IMT
      • Enables all responsible agencies to manage an incident together by establishing a common set of incident objectives and strategies.
      • Allows Incident Commanders to make joint decisions by establishing a single command structure.
      • Maintains unity of command. Each employee only reports to one supervisor.
      Incident Command Post Agency 1 Agency 2 Agency 3 Agency 1 Incident Commander Agency 2 Incident Commander Agency 3 Incident Commander
    • EMS and ICS Objectives EMS and ICS: Working with IMTs
    • Our World Has Changed! Are You Prepared To Meet These New Challenges ! New York City has robust EMS, fire, and MCI capability. NYC used multiple IMTs in the days following 9/11 Shanksville, a small community in western Pennsylvania, was also impacted on 9/11
    • EMS In Major Incidents
      • Effective C 3 begins with first unit
        • Establish command
        • Do NOT treat patients
        • START Triage
    • EMS in ICS Organization Branches Air Ops Branch Divisions Groups Operations Section Single Resource Task Force Strike Team Resources Unit Planning Section Demob. Unit Situation Unit Doc. Unit Logistics Section Finance/Admin. Section Time Unit Compensation Claims Unit Procurement Unit Cost Unit Incident Commander Public Information Officer Liaison Officer Safety Officer Commun. Unit Medical Unit Food Unit Service Branch Support Branch Supply Unit Facilities Unit Ground Support Unit 2-28/31 EMS in Medical Unit
    • EMS in ICS Organization Branches Air Ops Branch Divisions Groups Operations Section Single Resource Task Force Strike Team Resources Unit Planning Section Demob. Unit Situation Unit Doc. Unit Logistics Section Finance/Admin. Section Time Unit Compensation Claims Unit Procurement Unit Cost Unit Incident Commander Public Information Officer Liaison Officer Safety Officer Commun. Unit Medical Unit Food Unit Service Branch Support Branch Supply Unit Facilities Unit Ground Support Unit EMS in Operations
    • ICS – EMS in Operations
    • IMS Terminology
      • Division = A geographical subdivision of an incident (North Division, Interior Division)
      • Group = A functional subdivision of an incident (Suppression Group, Rescue Group, EMS Group, Ventilation Group)
      Division vs. Group
    • IMS Terminology
      • Single Resource = One of anything (ambulance, fire engine, rescue truck) plus required staff
      • Task Force = Combination of single resources assembled for specific mission (battalion chief, EMS supervisor, engine, truck, heavy rescue, ambulance)
      • Strike Team = Set of single resources of same kind plus leader in vehicle (EMS supervisor and 5 ambulances)
    • EMS Branch Director
      • Declare major incident
      • Perform size-up
      • Priorities
        • Life Safety
        • Incident Stabilization (stable vs. unstable)
        • Property Conservation
      • Request appropriate assistance – consider IMT
      • Designate staging area
      • Designate treatment area(s)
      • Coordinate with other agencies as Unified Command
      • Direct EMS activities until relieved
    • Triage
      • Coordinate patient removal from danger with rescue/extrication personnel
      • Provide Command with updates
      • Identify/correct life-threats without slowing triage
      • Assess, categorize, tag
      • Coordinate “hazard zone” activities
      • Continuously retriage
    • Staging
      • Identify safe location for vehicle staging
      • Assure access routes
      • Assure orderly parking, traffic flow
      • Categorize units, capabilities
      • Assign units as requested
      • Inform Command of status
    • Treatment
      • Locate treatment areas, advise Command and Triage
      • Evaluate resources needed for treatment
      • Assign, coordinate treatment personnel
      • Maintain Morgue, Rehab units as needed
      • Inform Command of status
      • Inform Command of available staff
    • Transport
      • Establish transport area(s)
      • Request ambulances from staging
      • Coordinate transport of patients with dispatch or command hospital
      • Direct transport to appropriate facilities
      • Main records of patient destinations
      • Inform Command of status
    • Incident Command System - EMS EMS Branch Director Staging Officer Transport Officer Treatment Officer Triage Officer Hospitals Dispatch Movement Communication
    • IMTs in Colorado Objectives I’m with the IMT and I’m Here to Help… No really, I am Incident Command System Structure IMTs in Colorado National Incident Management System History Of the Incident Command System EMS and ICS: Working with IMTs
    • Incident Management Teams In Colorado Daniel Hatlestad [email_address] 720-232-5926 EMSAC November 2011 Southwest Colorado IMT