Curriculum management w pop quiz 2007

1,233 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,233
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Locus of Control- Is how decisions are made from top-down or bottom – up what structures (committee) are needed to make the plan work.
  • There are several planning models available to educators, although there is one that appears to be the most effective and popular in curriculum planning.
  • Curriculum planning obviously occurs at three levels :Federal level - when policy decisions and their implementations are planned.State level-when state offices of education plan for major change in graduation requirements.District levels- when they plan to revise a field of study; school level, when the school revises its program of studies or adds new courses; and at the classroom level when the teacher plans a new unit of study.Question: There seems to be the obvious question>Where is the balance between the state and district level curricular decision making. Because according to Douglas Reeves (2007-2008) founder of the Leadership and Learning Center he said, “every program, initiative, and strategy in the school is subjected to the relentless question, Is everything working?”Fenwick English advocated in 1980 there should, realistically, only be two levels of curriculum management: the state and the district For example, what was to be taught and what materials were to be used, indicating when it was to be taught.Critics have written:Question: What is the rational for standardization (in terms of achievement, equity, and efficiency)? Standardization- there will be an higher achievement.Equity- Everyone gets the same curriculum regardless of school and teacher assignment. Efficiency- More economical, the district can offer the same staff development, curriculum referenced test, and order large quanties of the same quality. In my opinion most people want Quality not Quantity !!!On the Other Hand:Kuklis and Kline wrote that teachers need to have a more active role in curriculum development-and it is more likely that school based process will provide for such active participation. Reservation about school autonomy- 1. different curricula will be difficult to manage and coordinateInefficientQuality might be affected because will school based curriculum team would probably not have as many resources as district teams.Finally:There has been no conclusive research that exist on this issue.
  • This task force committee is representative of how a school district special committee might be organized. For example, some school districts call their Task Force Council “The Vision Alive Committee”.The response to the crisis would not be to return to the same previous patterns that have been used.
  • he information stored in the curriculum database will greatly facilitate the work of several task forces.
  • There are several planning models available to educators, although there is one that appears to be the most effective and popular in curriculum planning.
  • What do you think it means with the phrase “What is and what should be”?
  • Curriculum management w pop quiz 2007

    1. 1. CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT<br />Curriculum Planning<br />Chapter Five<br />Michilli Warren-Hassan<br /> Curriculum Development<br />June 29, 2009<br />
    2. 2. What is curriculum planning?<br />Curriculum planning is the specification and sequencing of major decisions to be made in the future with regard to the curriculum.<br />Successful curriculum leaders know that a goal-based model of curriculum planning provides organizing strategies to determine the locus of control in decision making and what organizational structures are needed.<br />
    3. 3. Brain Pop<br />What is curriculum planning?<br />Curriculum planning is the specification and sequencing of major decisions to be made in the future with regard to the curriculum.<br />
    4. 4. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective I. OrganizeforPlanning<br />Determine the locus of planning decision: Differentiate between the district and school planning responsibilities.<br />Determine the organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br /> Identify leadership functions, and allocate those functions appropriately.<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Align the district’s educational goals with appropriate curricular fields as well as recommended standards by the learned societies and mandated state standards.<br />Develop a curriculum database.<br />Develop a planning calendar based on leaders’ assessments of organizational priorities.<br />Objective III. Carry Out Specific Activities<br />Conduct needs assessment – “What is and what should be”<br />Productivity areas by using standardized test, curriculum referenced test and other measures and data sources; use assessment results to determine the need for curriculum development or improvement.<br />Organize task forces to carry out development or improvement projects, and monitor the work of the task forces.<br />Evaluate development or improvement projects.<br />Make necessary organizational changes and revisions for effective implementation.<br />Secure resources needed for new or revised curricula.<br />Provide staff development needed for effective implementation.<br />People will support what they help create.<br />
    5. 5. The Goal Based Curriculum Model begins with three organizing strategies:<br />I. Organize forPlanning<br />Strategy<br />Determine the locus of planning decision: <br />First, the leader distinguish between district-and-school based responsibilities to clarify the locus of decision making.<br />Second, they decide what organizational structures are needed, appointing the needed advisory groups and task force.<br />Finally, they allocate specified leadership functions to district and school staff.<br />
    6. 6. Determine the Organizational Structures Needed:<br />Organizefor Planning<br />District Curriculum Advisory Council<br />A standing committee appointed by the superintendent of schools.<br />The committee consist of:<br />The school superintendent or assistant superintendent.<br />The school district curriculum directors or supervisors<br />Secondary-school principals<br />Teachers<br />Parents & other community representatives<br />Secondary-school students<br />Three organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br />District curriculum advisory council<br />School curriculum advisory council<br />Curriculum task force<br />
    7. 7. Brain Pop<br />District Curriculum Advisory Council<br />The committee will consist of:<br />The school superintendent or assistant superintendent.<br />The school district curriculum directors or supervisors<br />Secondary-school principals<br />Teachers<br />Parents & other community representatives<br />Secondary-school students<br />
    8. 8. Determine the Organizational Structures Needed:<br />School Curriculum Advisory Council<br />Organizefor Planning<br /><ul><li>Each school should have a advisory group. It members should be nominated by the faculty and appointed by the principal. The school advisory council would include the principal, subject-matter specialist or grade level leaders, teachers, and parents.
    9. 9. One of the teachers and one of the parents on the school advisory council should represent the school on the district council to ensure good communication between the two advisory groups.</li></ul>Determine the three organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br />District curriculum advisory council<br />School curriculum advisory council<br />Curriculum task force<br />
    10. 10. Determine the Organizational Structures Needed:<br />Organizefor Planning<br />Curriculum Task Force<br />The superintendent would appoint a number of task forces to deal with any major issues that might need attention.<br />Members would be appointed on the basis of technical skills required for the job.<br />Most task force would include a curriculum specialist, principal, and several knowledgeable teachers.<br />Each task force would be given a specific problem to solve, a deadline for developing and implementing the solution, and the resources required to do the job. <br />Ordinarily, a task force would continue in existence only until the problem has been solved.<br /> Determine the three organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br />District curriculum advisory council<br />School curriculum advisory council<br />Curriculum task force<br />
    11. 11. Identify & Allocate Leadership Functions<br />Organizefor Planning<br />Identify Leadership Functions<br />Identify leadership functions, and allocate those functions appropriately.<br />Giving the task force a special title is an important part of the process. <br />Developing an effective task force can be a crucial part of the process of curriculum planning.<br />A more useful answer is to analyze the leadership functions required at both the district and school levels. <br />Identify & allocate leadership functions at school levels, allocate these functions to those best able to perform them.<br />Then decide what additional staff if any are needed-in some cases, creating new kinds of positions.<br />
    12. 12. Identify & Allocate Leadership Functions<br />Organizefor Planning<br />Allocate Leadership Functions<br />The intention is to describe leadership functions as clearly as possible, because too many curriculum workers have only a vague understanding of their responsibilities.<br />First the advisory board should review the form to ensure that it includes all the functions they consider important and use language that communicates clearly to the educators and the district. <br />Next, the superintendent or the assistant superintendent with input from the central office staff, and principals, should take over the complex sensitive task of reallocating and reassigning those functions for maximum effectiveness.<br />Identify leadership functions, and allocate those functions appropriately.<br />
    13. 13. Brain Pop<br />When allocating leadership functions why is it important to describe the leadership functions as clearly as possible?<br />Essentially there are too many curriculum workers have only a vague understanding of their responsibilities.<br />
    14. 14. Identify & Allocate Leadership Functions<br />Then the leaders should first analyze which individuals in the district are presently responsible for those functions, entering the role of the Now Column. <br />In many instances, they will indicate that not one is presently performing those functions.<br />After assessing how effectively those functions are being performed and how equitably they are distributed, the advisory council should determine where changes should be made in present assignments entering those decisions in the Assign column.<br />The assign column yield a clear picture of which functions can best be discharged by reassigning them to present role incumbents.<br />The allocation of a newly conceived role is reflected by placing the new role title in the New column. <br />5.3 Functions of Curriculum Leadership<br />
    15. 15. Functions of Curriculum Leadership<br />
    16. 16. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective I. OrganizeforPlanning<br />Determine the locus of planning decision: Differentiate between the district and school planning responsibilities.<br />Determine the organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br /> Identify leadership functions, and allocate those functions appropriately.<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Align the district’s educational goals with appropriate curricular fields as well as recommended standards by the learned societies and mandated state standards.<br />Develop a curriculum database.<br />Develop a planning calendar based on leaders’ assessments of organizational priorities.<br />Objective III. Carry Out Specific Activities<br />Conduct needs assessment – “What is and what should be”<br />Productivity areas by using standardized test, curriculum referenced test and other measures and data sources; use assessment results to determine the need for curriculum development or improvement.<br />Organize task forces to carry out development or improvement projects, and monitor the work of the task forces.<br />Evaluate development or improvement projects.<br />Make necessary organizational changes and revisions for effective implementation.<br />Secure resources needed for new or revised curricula.<br />Provide staff development needed for effective implementation.<br />
    17. 17. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Align the district’s educational goals with appropriate curricular fields as well as recommended standards by the learned societies and mandated state standards.<br />Brain Pop<br />What do we call our district standards?<br />Comprehensive curriculum and/or Grade Level Expectations<br />
    18. 18. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Develop a curriculum database.<br />
    19. 19. Community Resources<br /> 1. People with knowledge, expertise, and influence<br /> 2. Organizations and places useful as resources. <br />Students<br />Date of birth, sex, and ethnic identity<br />Eligibility for federal or state assistance programs.<br />Parents’ occupations and martial status.<br />Verbal & mathematical abilities and IQ score.<br />Talents', skills, and special interest.<br />School achievement: Standardized test scores and curriculum-referenced test scores<br />English proficiency: native language /other<br />Limitations: physical, emotional, and learning disabilities<br />Learning styles and cognitive levels<br />Career and educational plans<br />Career and educational plans<br />Extracurricular activities<br />Community activities<br />Faculty<br />Subject and grades certified to teach<br />Present assignments<br />Special interest and competencies<br />Recent professional development: courses, workshops, etc<br />School<br />Courses offered and enrollments<br />Extracurricular activities and student participation<br />Other Resources<br />State curriculum guides<br />Curriculum guides from other districts<br />Other sources of learning objectives<br />Professional materials and resources for teachers.<br />Establishing the Framework<br />Developing a Curriculum Database<br />
    20. 20. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Develop a planning calendar based on leaders’ assessments of organizational priorities.<br />
    21. 21. Develop a Planning Calendar<br />The planning calendar should include the six steps listed as “specific planning activities” Also, note the distinction is made between major and other fields, simply to assist in the planning process, not to depreciate the importance of such areas as art, etc. <br />The superintendent and the district leadership team should begin by tentatively mapping out a 5-year plan that would indicate year by year the major projects undertaken.<br />The final form of the calendar can then be used by leaders to develop budget request, appoint task force, and monitor their progress.<br />
    22. 22. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective III. Carry Out Specific Activities<br />Conduct needs assessment – “What is and what should be”<br />Productivity areas by using standardized test, curriculum referenced test and other measures and data sources; use assessment results to determine the need for curriculum development or improvement.<br />Organize task forces to carry out development or improvement projects, and monitor the work of the task forces.<br />Evaluate development or improvement projects.<br />Make necessary organizational changes and revisions for effective implementation.<br />Secure resources needed for new or revised curricula.<br />Provide staff development needed for effective implementation.<br />Objective I. OrganizeforPlanning<br />Determine the locus of planning decision: Differentiate between the district and school planning responsibilities.<br />Determine the organizational structures needed to facilitate planning, and set up those structures.<br /> Identify leadership functions, and allocate those functions appropriately.<br />Objective II. Establish the Planning Framework<br />Align the district’s educational goals with appropriate curricular fields as well as recommended standards by the learned societies and mandated state standards.<br />Develop a curriculum database.<br />Develop a planning calendar based on leaders’ assessments of organizational priorities.<br />
    23. 23. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective III. Carry Out Specific Activities<br />Conduct needs assessment – “What is and what should be”<br />What do you think the phrase “What is and what it should be” means?<br />Productivity areas by using standardized test, curriculum referenced test and other measures and data sources; use assessment results to determine the need for curriculum development or improvement.<br />Brain Pop<br />
    24. 24. Establish a Data Driven School<br />What does the district want to know?<br />1. Current district goals<br />2. Patterns in data<br />3. Upcoming district decisions<br />4. Questions raised by teachers, administrators, or the community<br />How will the district find out:<br />What to do?:<br />1. Form data teams<br />2. Conduct inventory of data currently compiled in the district and determine format (electronic or paper).<br />3. Assess technology capacity of the district to manage and analyze data.<br />4. Determine the extent to which personnel in the district have time, skill, and willingness to engage in data-driven projects.<br />5. Identify indicators of input, process, and outcome variables related to goals.<br />6. Train staff to collect and use data.<br />Analyze and disaggregate data. <br />What does the district do next?<br />How to proceed:<br />Establish benchmarks and measure progress toward goals over time.<br />Develop action or school improvement plans.<br />Communicate findings.<br />
    25. 25. Goal-Based Curriculum Planning ModelObjective Outline<br />Objective III. Carry Out Specific Activities<br />Organize task forces to carry out development or improvement projects, and monitor the work of the task forces.<br />Evaluate development or improvement projects.<br />Make necessary organizational changes and revisions for effective implementation.<br />Secure resources needed for new or revised curricula.<br />Provide staff development needed for effective implementation.<br />
    26. 26. Organize, Evaluate, Change, Provide Resources. <br />It is important to make sure that the curriculum process is based on the curricular goals and available resources. Not only are the materials are important but also the capacity to provide training and staff development. <br />One of the most effective means of ensuring successful implementation of new curricula is to integrate effective staff-development programs with any major curricular change.<br />Curriculum Tip<br />Many curriculum projects of excellent quality have not been implemented successfully because they were not supported with the right kind of staff development.<br />

    ×