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KMRM "Using Enterprise 2.0 in Knowledge Management" presentation outline notes to accompany the slideshare power point upload. Presentation given at the KPM Symposium, Aug. 12 and 13, 2009, at the ...

KMRM "Using Enterprise 2.0 in Knowledge Management" presentation outline notes to accompany the slideshare power point upload. Presentation given at the KPM Symposium, Aug. 12 and 13, 2009, at the University of Oklahoma Tulsa Campus; sponsored by kipanet.org.

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Kmrm E20 Presentation Outline Kmrm E20 Presentation Outline Document Transcript

  • 
 “Using
Enterprise
2.0
in
KM”
 
 Make
it
Real.
(Out
of
KM
1.0
theory
and
into
an
everyday
business
setting.)

 Take
it
Home.
(Links
to
resources
on
the
KMRM
website.)
 2009
KPM
Symposium
Presentation
Outline:

 I. Introduction
to
WEB
2.0:

 a. Question
audience:
“What
is
your
understanding
of
2.0;
BOK
is
using
it
in
their
 Free
Checking
2.0
ad
campaign.”


 b. KMRM
answer:
“Original
purpose
of
“?.0”
was
to
indicate
program
and
software
 updates.
Web
2.0
is
not
an
update
to
the
web,
it’s
an
update
in
understanding
of
 the
new
way
the
web
works
and
new
ways
you
can
use
it.
It
makes
the
web
 collaborative,
i.e.
something
to
embrace
instead
of
something
that
imposes
 information.
 c. Web
2.0
thinking
began
in
2004
by
Tim
O’Reilly
of
O’Reilly
Media,
Inc.
at
the
 Web
2.0
conference.
Internet
was
evolving.
Article
is
referenced
on
the
KMRM
 website
blog
posting
for
the
KPM
Symposium.
 i. Web
is
changing
from
static
to
dynamic
web
pages;
less
like
reading
a
 brochure;
now
users
have
more
interaction
with
the
platform.
 ii. Enterprise
2.0
(E2.0)
takes
tools
of
Web
2.0
and
concepts
of
KM
into
 everyday
business;
new
tools
make
collaboration
easier
and
less
imposed
 or
outside
of
everyday
work.
 iii. E2.0
term
coined
in
2006
by
Andrew
McAfee,
Assoc.
Professor
at
Harvard
 Business
School.
 d. Briefly
go
over
outline
of
the
balance
of
the
presentation
so
they
know
what
to
 expect:
 i. Is
KM
dead?
 ii. A
modern‐day
“tale”
case
study
 iii. Social
computing
 iv. Ideas
to
Make
it
Real.
Take
it
Home
 v. Questions,
brainstorming,
collaboration
 
 SEGUE:
In
the
spirit
2.0:
let’s
turn
this
into
a
collaborative
discussion.
 

  • KMRM
Consulting,
LLC
presentation
for
2009
KPM
Symposium
“Using
Enterprise
2.0
in
Knowledge
Management”

 2
 II. Is
KM
dead?
(We
pondered
this
while
preparing
for
this
presentation.
Snowden
&
 Prusak
interview
suggest
KM
is
in
transformation;
being
re‐thought;
and
returning
 to
the
“real”
KM.)
Video
is
referenced
on
the
KMRM
website
blog
posting
for
the
 KPM
Symposium.
 a. Question
audience:
“Is
KM
dead?
Yes
or
No?”
 b. KMRM
answer:
If
yes,
why
are
you
here?
If
no,
why
is
this
being
questioned
by
 KM
leaders
around
the
world?
 c. Question
audience:
“How
many
can
articulate
what
“KM”
is
to
clients
or
peers?

 d. KMRM
answer:
“If
selling
the
concept
of
KM,
we
ought
to
be
able
to
articulate
 what
it
is.”
 i. Traditional
KM
(or
KM
1.0)

 1. Heavy
focus
on
TECHNOLOGY:
traditional
knowledge
capture
 tools
are
used,
including
content
management
systems,
ERP
 systems,
taxonomies,
groupware,
server
files,
directories;
basically
 volumes
of
unused
vaults
of
information.
Often
these
systems
were
 imposed
and
they
may
or
may
not
be
used.
Perhaps
why
KM
is
 dying?!?
 a. KM
1.0
didn’t
care
 b. KM
1.0
doesn’t
work
because
knowledge
is
NOT
 transferable
 2. The
real
KM
is
PEOPLE,
process
and
technology.
In
KM
1.0
the
 human
element
was
almost
always
missing.

 ii. Enterprise
2.0
can
help
better
explain
&
accomplish
KM.
It
allows
your
 organization
to
embrace
it;
it
provides
a
collision
of
abstract
theory
with
 everyday
business.
We’re
giving
you
a
way
to
“Make
it
Real.
Take
it
 Home.”
 e. TECHNOLOGY.
KM
1.0
is
no
longer
practical
in
the
21st
Century
because
it’s
no
 longer
about
storing
knowledge,
but
about
knowledge
just
in
time.
 f. PEOPLE.
Web
2.0
enters
the
business
world;
beginnings
of
Enterprise
2.0
SEGUE:
 How
we
used
INNOVATIVE
solution
for
our
client.
 
 III. A
modern‐day
“tale”
case
study:

 a. Story
 i. Client
request
=
KM
1.0
to
document
processes.
They
thought
they
knew
 what
they
wanted,
They
started
with
a
business
problem.
Ultimately,
we
 found
the
solution
using
a
Web
2.0
tool
and
involved
employees
to
enable
 processes
to
become
dynamic.
 1. The
client
“thought”
they
were
being
innovative
with
KM
1.0
 techniques
by
documenting
intangible
knowledge
into
tangible
 knowledge
by
way
of
static
documented
business
processes,
e.g.
 printed
notebooks
and
digital
copy
on
internal
server.
 KMRM.com

•

P.O.
Box
33055

•

Tulsa,
OK
74153

•

Michelle
Farabough,
918‐633‐0825

•

Ken
Lewis,
918‐691‐1154

 
 

  • KMRM
Consulting,
LLC
presentation
for
2009
KPM
Symposium
“Using
Enterprise
2.0
in
Knowledge
Management”

 3
 2. Information
would
have
only
been
accessible
IF
someone
could
 find
the
information
while
they
were
at
work.
Updating
the
 information
seemed
unlikely.
 ii. TECHNOLOGY.
We
proposed
a
Web
2.0
technology
(wiki);
client
was
 reluctant
 iii. PEOPLE.
Segue
to
specifics
of
social
computing
and
E2.0…
from
data‐ centric
to
people‐driven
applications,
e.g.
how
people
use
data
 
 b. Culture
1.0

 i. The
vice
president
(VP)
of
solutions
didn’t
think
he
needed
to
embrace
 the
wiki
because
he
believed
his
department
was
already
transparent
and
 adequately
sharing
information.
However,
for
example,
the
VP
of
 engineering
needed
costing
information
not
already
made
available.
The
 VP
of
solutions
said,
“Tell
me
which
information
you
want
us
to
make
 accessible,
to
which
the
VP
of
engineering
said
“I
don’t
know
what
I
need
 until
I
need
it
and
by
then
I
don’t
want
to
have
to
wait
for
it.”

 ii. TECHNOLOGY.
This
was
the
beginning
of
the
bridge
to
E2.0
and
use
of
 Web
2.0
technologies
into
the
daily
work‐life.
We
encouraged
the
use
of
 the
wiki
for
project
management,
meeting
agendas,
project
kick‐off
notes,
 materials
delivery
updates,
scheduling
milestones,
etc…


 iii. PROCESS/ORGANIZATION.
Important
to
make
E2.0
part
of
everyday!
 1. Example:
Worker
in
shop
created
an
engineering
solution
that
 otherwise
wouldn’t
have
happened
if
the
communication
of
 information
was
via
email
or
meeting
or
standard
1.0
ways
of
 doing
business
instead
of
on
the
wiki.
The
traditional
hierarchy
 dictates
that
the
shop
worker
doesn’t
need
to
know
the
 information.
 iv. PEOPLE.
Emotional
intelligence
and
improved
organizational
culture
is
 crucial
for
success
in
getting
the
PEOPLE
element
into
the
process.
We
 interviewed
key
managers,
as
well
as
shop
workers,
and
ultimately
found
 a
solution
from
talking
with
a
large
sample
of
all
employees.
 
 IV. E2.0,
i.e.
“Social
Computing,”
i.e.
introducing
a
new
business
culture
 a. Question
audience:
“What
IS
social
computing?
What
“could”
have
happened
 using
all
Web
2.0
technology
available?
What
“could”
have
happened
if
the
 TECHNOLOGY
tools
were
used
alone,
without
personal
buy
in?”

 b. KMRM
answer:
“Now
“PEOPLE”
are
part
of
it!
That
allows
a
culture
change
in
the
 way
we
do
things
(PROCESS/ORGANIZATION)
 i. Make
social
computing
part
of
daily
work‐life.

 ii. Sharing
knowledge
becomes
an
added
effect/benefit
of
work.

 iii. E2.0
allows
not
just
information,
but
info
in
context.
“While
we’re
doing
 our
project,
we
leave
footprints
in
the
system…”
With
Web
2.0
tools
we
 can
do
this
with
wiki
comments
boxes,
meeting
agenda
note
pages,
 KMRM.com

•

P.O.
Box
33055

•

Tulsa,
OK
74153

•

Michelle
Farabough,
918‐633‐0825

•

Ken
Lewis,
918‐691‐1154

 
 
 View slide
  • KMRM
Consulting,
LLC
presentation
for
2009
KPM
Symposium
“Using
Enterprise
2.0
in
Knowledge
Management”

 4
 reference
links,
etc.
Info
in
context
–
knowledge;
now
knowledge
can
be
 used
and
reused;
new
knowledge
can
be
created:
“INNOVATION!”
 c. Must
be
innovative
to
survive;
offer
quote
from
AMEX
CEO
 i. Briefly
explain
the
difference
between
traditional
processes
and
rainy
day
 processes
that
can
be
developed
collaboratively
on
a
wiki
platform.
 d. TECHNOLOGY.
hammer/wrench
tool
story

 e. PEOPLE.
Social
computing
offers
a
platform
for
organizations
to
become
more
 healthy

 i. Sharing
of
information
is
now
peer
monitored,
not
hierarchical;
this
equal
 give
and
take
encourages
employees
to
feel
free
to
share
information.
 ii. Mention
the
Learning
Organization
ten
step
theory:
a
feeling
of
safety
 required;
there
is
a
need
for
a
new
culture
of
openness.


 iii. Imposed
vs.
embrace;
scary
to
give
people
freedom;
traditional
IT
issues
 1. Structured
vs.
open
environment.
Wiki
front‐page
design
was
 customized
for
employee
needs
and
wants,
e.g.
weather
link,
 dictionary
link.
Wiki
became
the
company’s
intranet.

 2. There
was
resistance.
Top
management
was
concerned
about
the
 personalized
“facebook”‐type
employee
pages,
fearing
the
wiki
 would
become
a
play
toy.

 3. Tell
mom
and
corporate
blogging
story.
 f. Show
a
way
to
use
the
variety
of
Web
2.0
tools
for
project
management.
 i. Wiki
 ii. Blog
 iii. Microblog
 iv. Forum
 v. RSS
 
 V. How
can
YOU
Make
it
Real.
Take
it
Home?
 a. “The
right
culture
is
a
GOAL,
not
a
pre‐condition”
 b. Culture
will
make
a
difference.
Your
own
company
must
determine
level
of
 access,
transparency,
etc…
for
now
 c. Enterprise
2.0
OFFERS
an
opportunity
for
cultural
change
as
issues
arise
in
 integrating
new
technologies

 i. Start
small
(one
agile
project)
and
think
big
(E2.0
creates
a
knowledge
 infrastructure)
 ii. Offer
steps
to
adopt
E2.0
 1. Carefully
identify
business
goals
best
solved
with
E2.0
 2. Define
workers
and
projects
for
each
goal.
 3. Select
the
correct
tools
and
integrate
them:
wikis,
communities,
 tagging,
blogging,
social
bookmarking,
social
profiles,
micro‐ blogging,
status
updates.

 4. Announce
proper
guidelines
and
best
practices,
i.e.
agreed‐upon
 ways
to
use
the
tools,
e.g.
twitter’s
140
characters
or
less
 KMRM.com

•

P.O.
Box
33055

•

Tulsa,
OK
74153

•

Michelle
Farabough,
918‐633‐0825

•

Ken
Lewis,
918‐691‐1154

 
 
 View slide
  • KMRM
Consulting,
LLC
presentation
for
2009
KPM
Symposium
“Using
Enterprise
2.0
in
Knowledge
Management”

 5
 5. Identify
obstacles.
 6. Identify
desired
cultural
change.
 iii. Offer
advantages
and
benefits
of
adopting
E2.0
 1. Attain
organizational
agility
 2. Accelerate
employee
engagement
and
raise
productivity
even
as
 resources
become
scarce
 3. Develop
trusted
relationships
and
open
the
door
to
mentoring
and
 knowledge
sharing
 4. Connect
people
to
the
content
and
processes
they
need
to
get
their
 job
done
 5. Create
and
protect
corporate
knowledge
 6. Manage
human
capital
and
improve
organizational
culture
 VI. Questions,
brainstorming,
collaboration
 a. What
can
we
do
for
you?
 b. Information
and
resources
are
available
on
the
KMRM
website
in
a
blog
post
 entitled
“Innovation!”
 Resources:
 1. Euan
Semple
videos
used
in
KPM
Symposium
presentation:
 http://www.guruonline.tv/business‐social‐media
 2. KMRM
case
study:
http://kmrm.com/case‐study
 3. Enterprise
2.0
Conference:
http://www.e2conf.com/sanfrancisco/
 4. Tim
O’Reilly
on
Web
2.0:
http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what‐is‐web‐20.html
 5. Snowden
&
Prusak
interview
“Is
KM
Dead?”:
http://blip.tv/file/1048981/
 6. Twitter
101
for
businesses:
http://business.twitter.com/twitter101/
 7. 12
Rules
for
Bringing
Social
to
your
Business:
 http://socialcomputingjournal.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=833
 8. Using
Web
2.0
to
Reinvent
your
Business
for
the
Economic
Downturn:
 http://blogs.zdnet.com/Hinchcliffe/?p=223
 9. 10
Aspects
of
Web
2.0
every
CIO
should
know:
 http://web2.socialcomputingjournal.com/ten_aspects_of_web_20_strategy_that_every_ cto_and_cio_shoul.htm
 10. 10
Top
Issues
in
Adopting
Enterprise
Social
Computing:
 http://bx.businessweek.com/enterprise‐ 20/view?url=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.zdnet.com%2FHinchcliffe%2F%3Fp%3D581
 

 
 
 KMRM.com

•

P.O.
Box
33055

•

Tulsa,
OK
74153

•

Michelle
Farabough,
918‐633‐0825

•

Ken
Lewis,
918‐691‐1154