Different Groups’
Perceptions of Children
with Autism
By Michelle Abbasciano
What is Autism?...
Also

known as ASD, or Autism
Spectrum Disorder
Neural

development disorder characterized
by repetit...
Some stats about ASD…
4-5

times more common among boys than
girls.

Estimated

1 out of 54
boys and 1 in 252 girls
are ...
What causes Autism?...
In

the early days, many
believed it was caused by
bad parenting
– distant and cold mothers!
Real...
What about the kids?...
 No

two children on the spectrum and their
characteristics are the same.

 Many

on the autism ...
Throughout their lives…
 Children

with autism will have to work with
dozens of different kinds of people in their lives....
The Parents…
 Multitude

of studies done gauging parents’
experiences with family, friends, and the public
interacting wi...
The Parents…


Complete strangers scold them. Some ignored it, some
either yelled back or tried to inform the aggressor.
...
The Teachers…
 In

one large study of Greek teachers, a majority of
the respondents believed autism was the most
serious ...
The Teachers…

A

recent study in 2011 indicated that general
education teachers still are hesitant about the
idea of hav...
The Teachers…


Some teachers have expressed concerns about having
children autism/emotional behavioral disorders in the
...
The Children…
 Children

tend to perceive their peers with autism with
negativity as opposed to those without autism.

 ...
The Children…
 Another

small study showed that children with
autism are judged as less friendly by their peers,
based so...
The Children…
 And

what about the children
with autism? How do they view
themselves?
 Not

many studies have been done ...
To sum it up…
 Everyone

is always going to have an opinion.
Perceptions are just the way people view certain
things base...
What it all means…
 “Autistic

children appear to be physically normal,
yet suffer from a disability that is extremely
pe...
What it all means…
 For

us as teachers, we need to try to understand
each one of our students on varying levels;
accept ...
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Various groups’ perceptions of children with autism

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Various groups’ perceptions of children with autism

  1. 1. Different Groups’ Perceptions of Children with Autism By Michelle Abbasciano
  2. 2. What is Autism?... Also known as ASD, or Autism Spectrum Disorder Neural development disorder characterized by repetitive behavior, limited social skills and language impairments. Widely misunderstood disorder identified about 67 years ago by Leo Kanner.
  3. 3. Some stats about ASD… 4-5 times more common among boys than girls. Estimated 1 out of 54 boys and 1 in 252 girls are diagnosed with autism in the U.S. Statistics suggest prevalence rates have increased 10-17% annually in recent years.
  4. 4. What causes Autism?... In the early days, many believed it was caused by bad parenting – distant and cold mothers! Really it is most often a combination of autism risk genes and environmental factors that influence brain development.
  5. 5. What about the kids?...  No two children on the spectrum and their characteristics are the same.  Many on the autism spectrum have exceptional abilities – visual, musical and academic skills.  Others are affected differently by the disorder and are unable to live independently. Some are completely nonverbal.
  6. 6. Throughout their lives…  Children with autism will have to work with dozens of different kinds of people in their lives.  Teachers, aides, counselors, principals, special education teachers, doctors, therapists…and of course parents, family, and friends.  And all will have their own opinions and perspectives….
  7. 7. The Parents…  Multitude of studies done gauging parents’ experiences with family, friends, and the public interacting with their child with autism.  Strangers can’t ‘see’ the disorder, so they just think the child is throwing a fit and the parent is a bad parent.  Many parents feel stigmatized by their child’s disorder. Mothers tend to feel like this more often than fathers.
  8. 8. The Parents…  Complete strangers scold them. Some ignored it, some either yelled back or tried to inform the aggressor.  Some parents seem to be holding out for a cure. Others realize there is no cure. In both cases, they find multiple ways to cope with their child’s disorder.  Mothers in one study conveyed that their child with autism “saved them” or “healed” them in some way.
  9. 9. The Teachers…  In one large study of Greek teachers, a majority of the respondents believed autism was the most serious mental health disorder. A majority also didn’t think themselves informed of the condition enough to be able to pinpoint autistic characteristics and refer them to a specialist. A general consensus for this study was that the teacher respondents were not well informed enough on the condition and needed further special education training.
  10. 10. The Teachers… A recent study in 2011 indicated that general education teachers still are hesitant about the idea of having an inclusion classroom.  Though they do not look down poorly on children with autism, they more worry about the severity of the child’s autism and how it will affect their classroom management.
  11. 11. The Teachers…  Some teachers have expressed concerns about having children autism/emotional behavioral disorders in the general classroom mostly because of behavioral outbursts and lack of training and supports.  More and more teachers, however, are getting the training and support they need in the classroom, and can gladly and confidently teach to all kinds of children.  More teachers are also realizing that the inclusion of children with autism in the gen ed class can be beneficial for all if done appropriately and with the right support.
  12. 12. The Children…  Children tend to perceive their peers with autism with negativity as opposed to those without autism.  One study done in 2007 revealed that kids aged 7-12 were more likely to avoid the child described with autism and view them unlike themselves.
  13. 13. The Children…  Another small study showed that children with autism are judged as less friendly by their peers, based solely on their appearance.  That  From isn’t to say all children are like this! my experience in the classroom, I have observed children in an inclusion class interacting with and playing with children with autism without any problems or biases.
  14. 14. The Children…  And what about the children with autism? How do they view themselves?  Not many studies have been done that delve in to this question.  Some research has shown that high-functioning children with autism who perceived themselves as less socially competent demonstrated strong intellectual capabilities and greater understanding of others' emotional experiences than were those who perceived themselves as more socially competent.
  15. 15. To sum it up…  Everyone is always going to have an opinion. Perceptions are just the way people view certain things based on their personal experiences and exposures.  Children with autism tend to come under fire from teachers, peers, and people they don’t even know for things they can’t control.
  16. 16. What it all means…  “Autistic children appear to be physically normal, yet suffer from a disability that is extremely pervasive. It is this combination of pervasive disability and apparent physical normality that gives the stigma experienced by families with autistic children its unique quality.”
  17. 17. What it all means…  For us as teachers, we need to try to understand each one of our students on varying levels; accept them for who they are; use patience and understanding both with them and their parents; and above all else, always be kind. You never know what struggles they are having outside of school.
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