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Tips and Strategies for Engaging Youth
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Tips and Strategies for Engaging Youth

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  • Reward behavior that you want to encourage.
    Punish behavior you want to discourage.
    Assumes that main drivers of human motivation are rewards/punishments.
    Works well for repetitive, simple tasks that require rudimentary cognitive skill—routine, unchallenging, highly controlled.
  • Celebrate taking risks and open/honest conversation about what happened—what did/didn’t work.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tips and Tools for Engaging Youth Presented by Michele Martin The Bamboo Project, Inc.
    • 2. Michele Martin • Career Development Facilitator Instructor • 15+ years in career and workforce development • Work with PYN, PA Regional Career Education Partnerships, Job Corps.
    • 3. Agenda • DRIVE: What motivates people? • The Body/Mind/Heart Connection • Structures that Engage • Events & Activities that Engage
    • 4. When we ask. . . “How do I engage my students?”
    • 5. Often, we’re REALLY asking. . . “How can I get students to do what I want them to do when and how I want them to do it?”
    • 6. So we start thinking. . .
    • 7. DRIVE—Dan Pink
    • 8. 20th Century Motivation
    • 9. Rewards/Punishments lead to. . . • Diminished intrinsic motivation • Lower performance • Less creativity • “Crowding out” of good behavior • Narrowed focus • Restricted possibilities • Unethical behavior • Addictions • Short-term thinking
    • 10. 21st Century Motivation • AutonomyUrge to direct our own lives • MasteryDesire to get better at something that matters • PurposeYearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves
    • 11. Autonomy • Time—when they do something • Technique—how they do something • Team—who they work with • Task—what they do
    • 12. For more autonomy. . . • “These are the goals I have for us today—what goals do you want to include?” • “These are some things that are fixed in our schedule today, but we also have flexibility for other things— how do we want to organize our time? • “These are the ideas I have for how to accomplish this goal—what ideas do you have? Maybe we should experiment with some different ways to do it?”
    • 13. Mastery • Find “Goldilocks Tasks”—not too simple and not too difficult • Create the right environment – Autonomy – Clear goals – Immediate feedback— • This is working—let’s keep going • This isn’t working—how do we need to change it up?
    • 14. Purpose • Help people discover and connect to a larger purpose for their activities. • How can they use their talents/gifts to connect to something bigger than themselves?
    • 15. For more purpose. . . • How can youth connect to giving to others in a way that feels important and relevant? • How can we help them discover and consistently use and develop their gifts through the classroom experience?
    • 16. Other Ideas • Include students in creating rules, norms, routines and consequences – Social contracts—What are the things you need to feel comfortable, creative, safe and happy? – How can we give each other feedback to work effectively? – What environment helps me do my best work? • Project plans • What do I want to master in our time together?
    • 17. Engaging Body/Mind/Heart
    • 18. Body • Visual • Verbal • Auditory • Touch • Smell • How do we use physical space to engage? • How do we tap into the 5 senses for expression, reflection, learning? • How do we work WITH physical energy?
    • 19. Mind • Neural Plasticity— “What we focus on grows” • Mindfulness • How do we create more positive pathways? • How do we calm our minds to focus? • How do we stimulate our minds to create?
    • 20. Heart • Identity and Values • Emotions as the fuel • How do we help young people recognize and express their emotions? • How do we soothe, validate and inspire? • How do we make it safe to express emotions?
    • 21. Structures that Engage
    • 22. Rituals
    • 23. What Rituals Do You Use? • Great Beginnings • Impactful Endings • Reflection • Daily, weekly
    • 24. Some Ideas • 1-Sentence Journals • 2-Minute Meditation • 3-Minute Free Write • 15-Minute Weekly Assessment: – What is working well that I want to build on next week? – What changes could we make, no matter how small, to make this experience more effective, enjoyable? – What did I handle particularly well this week? What made it successful and how can I apply going forward?
    • 25. Experiments
    • 26. The Experimental Approach • Start with a compelling idea/question • Take action to test the idea/question. • Observe what happens. • Reflect on what happens • Refine • Start again
    • 27. Some Experiments • Tracking emotions • Trying out a new habit • Values implementation • 106 Tips for Master Connectors
    • 28. Conversations
    • 29. Compelling Conversations • Authentic, important questions • “Knee to Knee” and Circles • Listen to understand • Speak from the heart • Connect to multiple perspectives
    • 30. Design Thinking
    • 31. How can you incorporate? • Into individual interactions? • Into classroom? • Into program? • Into organization?
    • 32. Technology/Social Media • Work WITH tech, not against it! • Use it to: – Have conversations – Collect feedback – Tell stories – Share/model
    • 33. Hangouts/Hangouts on Air • Virtual interviewing and panel discussions • Virtual tours • Broadcast events/activities
    • 34. NearPod
    • 35. ClassPager
    • 36. Events & Activities that Engage
    • 37. FailFaire
    • 38. Running a FailFaire • 7-minute explanation • First names only • No recording • No blame • Single question for audience response • Audience participation
    • 39. IGNITE
    • 40. Running an IGNITE Session • Compelling question/idea/story: – What are you passionate about? – What great story do you have to tell? • Be visual! • Slides auto-advance • Rehearse • Have fun!
    • 41. Walls
    • 42. Making a Wall • Work with students to identify themes. • Use sticky notes, colored markers. • Encourage quotes, drawings, etc. related to the theme. • Take pictures and post on social media. • Change weekly or bi-weekly.
    • 43. Hidden Fortunes
    • 44. Unconferencing
    • 45. Unconference Agenda • Collaboratively developed agenda at beginning. • 3-4 rounds of sessions • Closing—what was learned? What next steps will we take?
    • 46. Unconference Session Formats • “How to do X. . .” • My Big (or Little) Question • Let’s talk about. . . • “Un-panels” (Fishbowl) • Speed Demos • World Café • Appreciative Inquiry— what’s working? • Open Awards
    • 47. What’s Next?
    • 48. Resources • Website: http://engagepyn.blogspot.com/ • Try it Tuesdays – Try with your students – Provide feedback – Share your own adaptations, resources, etc.

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