XXL Workshop 2013 - course guidelines

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Guidelines for Design and Research

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XXL Workshop 2013 - course guidelines

  1. 1. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Coordinating Chair: Coordinator: TOI – Design Informatics Arch. Michela Turrin Prof.dr. Sevil Sariyildiz, Head Room 01.West.030 Room 01.West.040 Tel 0031(0)629321839 E-mail I.S.Sariyildiz@tudelft.nl E-mail M.Turrin@tudelft.nl Architectural Design:CONTACTS ir. Paul de Ruiter Arch. Michela Turrin Room 01.West .030 Room 01.West .030 E-mail P.deRuiter@tudelft.nl E-mail M.Turrin@tudelft.nl Structural Design: ir. Andrew Borgart Prof.dr. Joop Paul Room 01.West .020 Room 01+.West .130 E-mail: A.Borgart@tudelft.nl E-mail: J.C.Paul@tudelft.nl Envelope Design:TUDELFT ir. T. Klein Room 01.West .130 E-mail: T.Klein@tudelft.nl Design Informatics: ir. Pirouz Nourian Dr. Ir. J.C. Hans Hubers Room 01.West .080 Room 01.West .080 E-mail P.Nourian@tudelft.nl E-mail J.C.Hubers@tudelft.nl Climate Design: Dr.ir.Martin Tempierik To be confirmed Room 01+.West .210 in substitution of Dr. Craig Martin E-mail: M.J.Tenpierik@tudelft.nl On-line International collaborations Dr. Bige Tuncer, MIT / SUTD – USA, Singapore Dr. Mine Ozkar, MIT / ITU – USA, Turkey Prof. Dr. Sun Yimin, SCUT - China Dr. Rudi Stouffs, TUDelft – The Netherlands Arch. ir. Ioannis Chatzikonstantinou, Yasar University – TurkeyGUESTS Lectures and/or juries Beert Boomsma, Ijsmeester / Hoofd technische dienst - Thailf Arch. Gerry Meagher, Architect Director - Alynia Architecten, NL Haaije Jorritsma - Heereveen Municip. Gerwin Venema - Fryslan Province Prof. Rob Nijsse, Engineer – ABT, NL Ir. Steven Lobregt, Engineer - Sparkling Projects, NL Dr. Carlos Infante Ferreira – Engineering Thermodynamics Dep. 3ME TUDelft, NL Ir. Marcel de Boer, Associate Structural Engineer – ARUP, NLWith contribution and collaboration of Yaşar University, Izmir – Turkey 2
  2. 2. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsContent:Introduction ……………………………………………………… 4Course objectives ……………………………………………… 4Design Exercise ………………………………………………… 4Design Team ……………………………………………………… 9Disciplines and Objectives ………………………………… 9Common and Individual Activities …………………… 11Weekly program ………………………………………………… 15Exams and grades ……………………………………………… 15Presentations …………………………………………………… 16Final deliverables ……………………………………………… 17Detailed Schedule ……………………………………………… 22 3
  3. 3. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsIntroductionThe XXL workshop is concerned with the design, computation, engineering, and production of a horizontallarge span building structure. This design process is done as a collaborative digital design in amultidisciplinary group of students in which each student has his/her own different responsibility. Thecollaborative digital design requires an integrated 3D approach with BIM (Building Information Modeling),performance analysis, and file to factory processes.Course objectivesThe course focuses on Integral Design. The interdisciplinary integration of the various fields of expertiseinvolved in the design process drives the activities of the course and will be evaluated and graded as a keyaspect. The integrated design process is applied for the design of a Sport venue, as described in thefollowing section.Figure 1 – Examples of projects and performance simulations by the students of XXL Workshop 2011.Design ExerciseThe design exercise focuses on a large span structure for an ice Arena and multifunctional ice rink sportvenue: the New Thialf, in Heerenveen (The Netherlands).The Municipality of Heerenveen, in the Fryslân province, currently hosts the a stadium used for long trackspeed skating, short track speed skating, ice hockey, figure skating, and non-sports events. Since long time,this venue has been a worldwide reference for ice skating; and it hosted a number of world relevant events,including two Speed Skating World Cup events. The current venue needs a new design. The Municipality ofHeerenveen and the Fryslân province, in close collaboration with a number of other institutions (such asKNSB, ISU, NOC*NSF, Rijksoverheid, Vrienden van Thialf, Businessclub Thialf, etc.), intend to develop anew unique stadium concept: a New Thialf. The project aims at a new “schaatsmekka”, able to attract aworldwide attention in the international ice-skating community; and at an international icon in the field ofenergy, sustainability and innovation. The project targets a new generation of elite Olympic-level venues. Inthis view, the new stadium highly contributes to the sport ambition of KNSB and NOC * NSF. On the otherhand, the project aims also at developing a new stadium as part of the other ambitious goals of the OlympicPlan 2028. These are sports participation, economy and employment, infrastructure, sustainability, socialusefulness and public benefit.As a consequence of this vision, iconic value, functional flexibility and sustainability are the keyrequirements of the new design.Firstly, the new building should offer a new image. The architectural design of the New Thialf is expected tobecome an internationally recognized icon for speed skating. The new building should be an emblematicbuilding, expressing a clear identity for the ice skating community. Ice skating is national culture in TheNetherlands. Therefore the New Thialf should provide an important contribution to the Dutch identity. Iceskating is also a professional sport in which Dutch skaters are well-known and for which Thialf offers aworldwide recognized reference. Therefore the New Thialf should contribute to the confirmation of theworld-class status Thailf has among the professionals. Moreover, the image of the New Thialf should reachthe large public. The project should become an attraction of great significance not only for professionals; 4
  4. 4. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Studentsinstead, it should exploit an iconic value for multi-levels skaters and public; it should offer a uniqueexperience for the professional skaters as well as for the spectators and for the amateurs.Secondly, the new building should have functional flexibility. It should allow exploiting more functions thanthe ones currently possible at Thialf. If on the one hand it is essential that the new ice rink remains thefastest lowland path of the world, on the other hand this is not enough for the success of the project.Reducing the time in which the ice arena is unused and integrating the venue in the citizen’s daily life arethe key criteria. Skating, like all sports, have a great social impact. For many people skating is a healthyexercise; but also a sport connecting and bringing people together, with no social exclusion. Encouragingthese aspects and offering them as important objectives is part of the new project. The ambition of the newconcept relays on the combination of a local as well as worldwide recognized sport activities; by allowingthe involvement of local and international happenings of different nature. The new concept should be anicon for international sports ambitions, but should also favor local sports participation; it should providesuitable infrastructure for large sport events; for large non-sport events; and for local activities of thecitizens. In this respect, functional flexibility is required.Thirdly, the new building should embrace principles of sustainability and innovation. The design of the newbuilding should allow development and operation of the new Thialf based on short and long termsustainability. This regards functionality, energy neutrality, amount and reusability of materials. The designof the new building should integrate innovative solutions, especially for energy efficiency in climate comfortand requirements. Energy efficiency should be reached by means of passive and active strategies. Possiblefunctional combinations (synergies) could be included by matching functions that allow making the buildingenergy neutral in heating/cooling.Figure 3 – The new Thialf should provide a unique experience both for professional and recreational skating. 5
  5. 5. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsLocationAfter having investigated alternative project variants in different locations for new designs as well as forrenovation, in early 2012 the city of Heerenveen and the Province of Fryslân decided to use the variant forrenovation and extension of the current project in the current location.Figure 3 – Location of Thialf in Heerenveen (The Netherlands) 6
  6. 6. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsThe ambition: from top-sport to local activities in a multifunctional design solutionUsually, top sport venues are used only in occasion of very big events, occurring once in a while. The newThialf intends to contrast this tendency. The arena should be designed in order to reduce or even eliminatethe time in which the buildings remain unused.Concerning its functional program, the primary focus for the New Thialf is placed on sports. In particular onthe organization of major skating events and training of athletes disciplines in the long track speed skating,inline skating and short track.According to what Thialf reports, the current setting of the arena lacks in focus. It houses six skating sports;each of which has sports training, competitions and the recreational skating; for a total of eighteen features.The consequence of this large number of functionalities is that none of those functionalities is optimallyoperated. For a future-proof New Thialf a clearer focus and strategy are necessary.Figure 4 – current ThialfThe New Thialf primarily intends to be an outstanding competition stadium. It has the ambition to be thebest match stadium of the world. Therefore the arena must contain the best competition tracks andoutstanding provisions for the athletes, the public, businesses and the media. In addition, the New Thialfmust provide an additional and separate training facility for the sport: a top sport training hall exclusivelyand continuously available for training and measurement. This must be proposed as a unique and super-modern training track. When competitions do not occur, the top-skaters must have the chance to trainunder the best circumstances in order to reach top performances; while the many amateur skaters can usethe competition track to have their rides in a wonderful ice rink. Moreover, additional space must be 7
  7. 7. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Studentsprovided for sport, recreation skating, and neighborhood functions. Finally, a relevant part of the spacesshould be possible to be used for non-sport activities, such as concerts and other public events.Therefore, the design brief is summarized in the following points:  Refurbishment of the current building with 400 m track (A)  Design of a new built facility for extra 400 m track (A)  Multifunctionality of the new facility, including concert venue (B)  Integration of secondary facilities (B)Additional details on the project requirements and settings will be provided during the visit on the projectsite; and during the lectures given by the responsible persons of Thialf, Municipality of Heerenveen, Fryslânprovince, Alynia Architects, and ABT.Note: Refurbishment of the existent track for competition, and addition of new track for training is theproject setting recommended to the students. However, different proposals and choices can also be made:especially, students might make a choice concerning which track is for top-sports training, competition andrecreation.Requirements for top sport activities (A)In the course material, a guide is provided to the students for the design of ice-rinks; and a lecture will alsospecifically address the topic. For this, special thanks are acknowledged to Breert Boomsma (Thialf).Requirements for leisure events (B)Focusing on other sport and leisure events (B), the main challenge of the design exercise deals with: a) The adaptability (by means of reconfiguration, subdivision or other strategies if needed) of the ice arena in order to accommodate the sport (professional and recreational) as well as the non-sport events; b) The adaptability (by means of reconfiguration, subdivision or other strategies if needed) of the tribunes in order to match the requirements (such as different capacities, visual requirements, etc.) of the sport (professional and recreational) as well as non-sport events; c) The design of a roof system and envelope able to satisfy the requirements of the different sport (professional and recreational) as well as non-sport events. d) The integration between the spaces and functions of the overall complex (the areas of the two tracks and the facilities).The ultimate goal is minimizing the weekly number of hours in which the spaces remain unused. The tracks,the tribunes and the roof have to be designed in order to achieve the flexibility of these spaces. Theirfunctional adaptability is crucial and can eventually be achieved also by means of mobile partitions,reconfigurable structures, sliding and adjustable parts, dismountable components, or any other principlesbased on static or adjustable elements. The strategies to approach the challenge can therefore be organizedbased on multi-functionality; re-arrangement/reorganization; extendibility; demountability; internalflexibility/adaptability; or other proposal the students will develop.The challenge: a sustainable design solutionThe student teams engage to demonstrate the suitability of their own design option. Functional flexibility isintegral part of a sustainable design solution. However, the criteria for sustainability include also otheraspects than functional flexibility only. The criteria based on which the design proposals can be comparedare summarized in the following Table 1.The principles listed in Table 1 can be considered numeric criteria given for a comparison between theoptions of design, in addition and not in substitution to the aesthetic criteria of an appealing and iconicdesign solution. 8
  8. 8. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsTable 1Criteria for sustainabilityAmount of material and “End-of-Life” Aiming at minimizing the needed material; aiming at maximizingprinciples for structure the end-of-life- re-usability/demountability.Amount of Material and “End-of-Life” Aiming at minimizing the needed material; and, moreprinciples for envelope importantly for cladding, aiming at maximizing the end-of-life- re-usability/demountability.Energy Aiming at minimizing the energy for thermal and lighto Needed Energy (for climate requirements and comfort; at maximizing the energy produced in requirements) the building; at maximizing the balance between the energyo Produced Energy produced minus the energy needed for the climatic control of theo Final Energy Gain building. Energy Zero is a mandatory target. Energy Plus is recommended.Hours of unused arena Aiming at minimizing the weekly number of expected hours in which the ice arena remains unused.Design TeamThe design process is developed based on the interdisciplinary activity of a design team composed by 5students. Each student will be responsible for one discipline. The work is structured according to fivedisciplines, corresponding to five roles in the team. The design and research objectives for each disciplineare described here following.Please note: in case of teams with four students, the tasks of Climate Design will be distributedtransversally, across the other disciplines.Disciplines and ObjectivesThe design and research objectives for each discipline can be described as following. Additional informationis provided at the beginning of the course based on lectures focusing on each single discipline.Table 2Architectural Instructors: Arch. Michela Turrin; ir. Paul de RuiterDesign A primary objective is the iconic value of the building. Aesthetic must be used to exploit the attractiveness of the project, which should become a worldwide recognizable landmark. The external and internal appearance of the New Thialf should be an emblem expressing the top class essence of ice skating. The indoor spaces of the New Thialf must offer a unique experience for professional skaters, for amateurs and for spectators. Concerning functionality, the objective is the design of a system of spaces able to satisfy events and activities of different nature. The spaces are meant to allow both occasional events with exceptionally high number of international spectators and minor events with limited and local public. The spaces and the envelope have to be designed based on innovative ideas for meeting the needs of the different situations without decreasing the uniqueness of the iconic experience they offer. In doing this, the architectural design process is supposed to integrate inputs from the different disciplines since its early concept.Envelope Instructor: ir. Tillmann KleinDesign The objective is the design of an envelope deeply integrated with the Architectural concept and beneficial for a sustainable climate design of the ice Arena. The envelope is essential for communicating the iconic value the New Thialf must provide. The envelope is the part of the building that is perceived the most when considering the external appearance of the project. The envelope becomes crucial for 9
  9. 9. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students the role of the building as recognizable landmark. Collaboration with the Architect is therefore deeply needed. The envelope is also essential for climate control, which is a crucial requirement for an ice Arena. Collaboration with the Climate Designer is therefore also deeply needed. Finally, the envelope should be designed in accordance with the structural system: both from a technical point of view and in order to exploit the aesthetic of the overall design. Attention to the total amount of needed material is recommended.Structural Instructors: Prof.Dr.ir. Joop Paul; ir. Andrew BorgartDesign The objective is the design of an innovative and efficient structural system for a large span ice Arena. The structural system is crucial both for the design of the envelope and for allowing the architectural iconic expression of the building. Due to the span of the building, the design of the structural system is a challenge that requires high collaboration, especially with the architect and the envelope designer. The structural system of such large span buildings is in fact crucial for the aesthetic of the overall design; it has large impact both for the indoor spaces and for the image of the building as landmark. If needed, the proposed structure may be reconfigurable to favor the functional adaptivity of the spaces. Attention to the total amount of needed material is recommended.Design Instructors: ir. Pirouz Nourian; Dr.ir. Hans HubersInformatics The objective is the conception and development of a digital and computational strategy to create an integrated multidisciplinary design process. This includes strategies for digital parametric modeling, loops between geometry and performance analysis, integration of prototyping, file exchange and archiving.Climate Design Instructors: Dr.ir. Martin Tenpierik; (Dr.Craig Lee Martin) The objective is the conception and development of an energy efficient Arena, by means of passive and active use of on-site energy resources. The ice Arena is a demanding building that requires high climate control. Required temperatures vary from -6 degrees Celsius on the ice track; to 10-15 degrees Celsius on the sitting areas; to 20 degrees Celsius in the rooms and offices. Humidity should be highly controlled. Acoustic is challenging. In all these aspects, the ice Arena should guarantee a properly controlled environment. At the same time, the ice Arena should have limited energy consumption for climate control as well as be designed as a zero energy (or even energy plus) building, based on renewable sources. Focus is given to energy reduction, energy-efficient climate systems, possible re-use of waste energy and sustainable energy production. Synergies among functions (for energy balance) are highly recommended. Acoustic and control of humidity are part of the challenge. For all these aspects, close collaboration especially with the envelope designer is expected. Moreover, collaboration with the architect is expected since the climate strategy can be integral part of the architectural concept. In fact, sustainability can also be expressed in the iconic value of the building. Moreover, strategies for energy balance can be used in order to define with the architect the functional program of the building. Attention will be required also to the use of materials. 10
  10. 10. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsCommon and Individual ActivitiesThe whole team and the shared goals of its activities are described in Table 3. The specificities of eachdiscipline are described in Table 4.Table 3TEAM TEAM ACTIVITYArchitectural The whole team develops the design solution based on close collaboration andDesigner interdisciplinary integration. Each team member is responsible for his/her own discipline, as part of the whole integrated process. The process is based on the convergence ofEnvelope each discipline into the development of the final design solution. The concepts for theDesigner whole architectural, envelope, structural, climate designs, and computational processStructural need to be conceived from the very beginning as part of one overall picture. Defining theDesigner overall picture of the design and developing it along the entire process is responsibility of the whole team.DesignInformatics As part of this overall picture, each team member is then responsible to develop theExpert specificities of his/her own discipline. The contributions of each discipline should be multidirectional. Each discipline is expected to contribute to the whole design by bothClimate taking inputs from and providing inputs to the other disciplines, according to the wholeDesigner design. Also, each discipline is expected to affect the design solution such that the final design will fully integrate inputs from each discipline. This interdisciplinary collaboration is expected during all the phases of the design process (from the conceptual design to the detailed design). It should occur at all the scales of the project (from the large scale of the overall ice Arena to the small scale of the components). During the whole process, the team approaches the tasks by means of:  Integrated multidisciplinary design process;  Use and production of physical working models;  Use of numeric performance analysis, computational geometry, digital information management.Figure 5 – Geometry driven by performance: example of interdisciplinary integration (XXL Workshop 2012) 11
  11. 11. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsTable 4TEAM JOB DESCRIPTIONMEMBERSArchitectural The architect of the team is expected to develop and guide the architectural concept ofDesigner the project along the entire design process. He/she is expected to develop the aesthetics values of the project, by proposing a personal approach on form, detailing and styling. This must be done by converging inputs from the different disciplines into a coherent overall style of the project. He/she is also expected to have the overall vision and control of the project by guaranteeing the fulfillment of the functional requirements as well as of all the other architectural performances. Focusing on the requirement of functional adaptivity, the architect is specifically expected to challenge the potentials of multifunctionality in architecture. This is intended as the capacity of spaces to not lose their aesthetic quality when used for different events. Re-configurability of elements may be used as a means to explore architectural concepts based on adaptability for functional requirements. Focusing on these aspects, the architect is expected to coordinate the design decisions across the different disciplines. Each team member is responsible for his own discipline, and the convergence of each discipline into a good design process will be up to everyone. However, the architect will have a key role in guiding and addressing this convergence within the whole vision and coherent aesthetic of the project. The tasks to be achieved during the process can be summarized as following:  analysis and understanding of the whole architectural program of the project;  overall vision of design concepts;  iteratively looped assessment/evaluation and review of the design considering the architectural performances (visual/aesthetic/iconic, functional adaptable, etc);  integration of interdisciplinary aspects into the whole design from the very early conceptual phase and during the entire design process.Envelope The envelope designer is expected to develop the design of the cladding for the iceDesigner Arena. He/she is supposed to address both material and geometric solutions of the envelope since the very early phase of the process. His/her role should be effective since the very early stage of the conceptual design, by means of integrated design. Early integration is needed for various aspects: - The skin of the project is supposed to be a key aspect of the design concept of the ice Arena; by early exploring different ideas on the envelope, the envelope designer is supposed to provide inputs for the Architectural concepts. - The envelope will act as key feature in filtering, controlling and using the environmental factors as energy resources and needs specific attention for Climate Design. - The envelope needs to be conceived in conjunction with the Structural system. During the whole integrated process, the envelope designer is responsible for developing a well performing skin. Performance to be evaluated includes the numerous requirements that an envelope is expected to satisfy. Specific attention is given to the need of functional adaptivity in architecture. Also, attention is needed for a sustainable control of climatic aspects. The envelope designer is expected to address these challenges along the whole design process and across different scales. Continuous zoom in and out from the various project scales are required during the entire design process of the envelope. This ranges from the large scale of the overall geometry, to the small scale of the single components and vice versa, in a continuous loop of assessments and performance evaluations (such as through energy calculations, fabrication plans, material use, etc.). For the conception and development of a performative envelope (analysis driven design), 12
  12. 12. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students the tasks to be achieved based on numeric performance evaluations are:  passive solar performance  energy production  material use and quantities  fabrication process.Structural The structural designer is responsible for conceiving and developing the structuraldesigner system of the ice Arena. He/she is supposed to address both material and geometric solutions since the very early phase of the process. His/her role should be effective since the very early stage of the conceptual design, by means of integrated design. The structural system is a key challenge in the design of the ice Arena. Its concept needs to be integrated since the very early phase with the architectural concept and the envelope concept. During the whole integrated process, the structural designer is responsible for developing a well performing structural system. Performance to be evaluated includes the numerous requirements that a structural system is expected to satisfy. Specific attention is given to the need of functional adaptivity in architecture, for which the structure might have to be reconfigurable. Reconfigurability can play a key role in the conception of the structure. The structure can take a driving role in the architectural conception, as for example by means of innovative structural systems that the structural designer is expected to explore, propose and develop. The structural system should be designed also considering aspects of sustainability. These can be considered based on evaluations on material use, quantities and properties. The integration between geometry and material properties has to be driven by the structural designer during the whole process and across the different scales. Numeric evaluations need to support each phase, including structural calculations, quantification of the needed materials, fabrication process, etc. For the conception and development of a well performative structural system (analysis driven design), the tasks to be achieved based on numeric performance evaluations are:  structural performances;  material use and quantities  fabrication processDesign The design informatics expert is responsible for the entire digital process of the design.Informatics This is intended not as a technical support but as strategy for a highly interdisciplinary,Expert integrated and performance-driven design process. Specific tasks are: a) The conception and development of the digital strategy to support the interdisciplinary exploration of the design solutions. This should occur from the conceptual design to the detailed phase, across the various scales of the project. The digital design strategy needs to be developed in close collaboration with the other team members, in order to be tailored on the specific design goals. The digital design strategy should enhance the potentials of the tools used in the process. Specifically these are parametric modeling (as a means to support the generation of geometric alternatives) and supports for performance evaluations (mainly, but not only, intended as digital simulations). Parametric geometric alternatives should be generated according to a meaningful strategy for design exploration. The parameterization process is a crucial part of the strategy and needs to be set accordingly and meaningfully. The performance evaluations can be used to explore the design alternatives toward the definition of a well performing solution. According to the different design strategies, digital tools can be highly customized based on the definition on the specificities of each design process and goal. b) During the whole design process, the design informatics expert is responsible also for 13
  13. 13. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students the integration of the different digital models from the various disciplines into a core model (according to BIM concepts); for the archive (including structuring the archive) and file exchanges; for rapid prototyping during all the phases of the design, starting from the early conceptual design, when needed; for scripting and customizing the digital tools according to the design strategy; etc. This role consists in the conception, organization and management of the digital design process; while the specific work on the digital models will be done by all the team members. c) When this overall digital process is set, the design informatics expert will focus on a specific topic of the design, for which the computational strategy needs a particularly deep development. As part of the whole digital design process, this will become his/her own specific individual work. The tasks to be achieved during the process can be summarized as following: - Conception and Management tasks:  conception and development of a digital and computational strategy to support the interdisciplinary design conception, exploration and development;  structure and management of the file archive and exchanges;  integration of specific digital models from the different disciplines into a core model;  customization of digital tools;  rapid prototyping with CNC machines. - Conception and Production tasks:  deep development of one chosen task by means of informatics and computation.Climate The climate designer is responsible for conceiving and developing a sustainable anddesigner energy efficient climatic control (thermal and lighting comfort; humidity and acoustic) of the ice Arena; and possibly an overall energy balance of the ice Arena during its use (in relation to climatic comfort). His/her challenge focuses on to the building-related energy and ice-skating related energy (refrigeration), while not mandatory requirements are considered neither for the embedded energy nor for use-related energy (appliances etc.). The climate designer must collaborate with the architect to define the overall volumetric form of the Arena and the arrangement of the diverse programmatic interior spaces; since these larger design intentions have a great impact on energy demand and their subsequent energy exchange potential. A greater emphasis on the local societal programs could be included, with focus on the potential of harvesting heat from the rink and pumping it to even more heat-demanding spaces within the building or adjacent to it. His/her tasks can be subdivided into three main groups: a) The conception and development of strategies to reduce the energy consumption by means of passive climatic control (such as: control of solar gain; shading; ventilation for cooling; daylight; etc.); b) The conception and development of strategies to produce energy by means of active technologies (such as: photovoltaic; solar panels; wind turbines; etc.). c) The conception of strategies for energy balance trough synergies of functions (to be coordinated with the Architect). d) The conception of a strategy for acoustic control. The energy produced can be used to supply the climatic control of the ice Arena when passive strategies are not sufficient. By combining passive and active strategies, the climatic control of the stadium is supposed to be a Zero Energy System. The eventual remaining amount of produced energy should be supplied for the other energy consuming needs of the building. The final energy balance should be as close as possible to a Zero Energy Arena and possibly, even an Energy Producing ice Arena. Such goal should be developed since the early conceptual phase and the energy balance should be calculated through the design process, in iterative loops. Concerning the tasks involving a proper use of materials, the climate designer will make use of catalogues in order to properly support his/her decision making process (a number of catalogues will be suggested and are available - i.e. the NIBE catalogue available through the website of TUDelft’s library). 14
  14. 14. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsWeekly programDuring Week 3.1, students are asked to familiarize with the project requirements and tasks, with thestructure of the activities of the whole team and of each team member. They are supposed to follow thelectures, learning about the site, the project, and the individual disciplines. The design teams will be formedand they will be asked to start brainstorming on two alternative conceptual designs.During Week 3.2, the main task for each team consists in finalizing the conceptual design of 2 designalternatives. Each concept should have a design vision for the overall design as well as each team membershould develop the ideas concerning his/her own specific discipline. Preliminary evaluation of the conceptsshould be presented according to each individual discipline.Paralelly to this main task, lectures and consults will take place; on the 20th of February 2013 a workshopwill be held to provide each team member with some 3D and parametric modeling skills. Students can startsetting up the overall process, including some organizational aspects (for example: set up the main 3Dmodel and the work process, set up the information structure for information storage and exchange, i.e. inDropBox and InfoBase; set up file naming convention; etc).At the end of the week, a pin-up presentation is held for the whole instruction team. Each team has 20minutes to present the two design concepts. Each concept must be introduced in its overall vision anddesign intention. After this short introduction, each team member must illustrate the concept for his/herspecific discipline. For each team, during the presentation, one of the two concepts will be chosen with thestudents. The choice will be made not only based on the interest and approach of the overall designintention, but also on the specific interest and feasibility for each individual discipline.Expected material for the pin-up presentations: Each team should make two presentations of about 6 slideseach one. In each of the two presentations, one slide is for presenting the overall vision of the designconcept. Five slides are for the five disciplines in the concept. For each discipline, ideas can be discussedboth with a top down approach from the large scale to the detailed scale; or vice-versa with a bottom upapproach, in which the details and use of specific components and materials at the small scale suggestpossible overall design directions. Eventual additional material (such as mockups) is welcome.During week 3.3, the conceptual design should be finalized into one specific project draft, whose generalperformances are quantitatively verified.The focus of each team member should be narrowed down to selected aspects only. While during the first 2weeks, broad exploration of various design directions is encouraged; during week 3 students are invited tofocus more and more on one specific design direction, by narrowing down the design explorationand strongly reducing its complexity. The design should be developed by focusing only on the key drivers ofthe chosen design direction. This should be achieved by reinforcing the integrated multidisciplinary designprocess, by means of different expertise becoming more and more focused and specific.Also, during week 3.3 performances should start being quantified, by means of cycles of performanceevaluations and simulations. The information extracted from the performance simulation should be used asfeedbacks for the design solutions and as a support of the decision making process. This should result in theintegration of simulation supports and design development, with iterative loops using numeric simulationand development cycles. On the 1st of March 2013, a workshop will take place on iterative loops in designinformatics.The use of physical working models is strongly recommended, when they support the design process.During week 3.4 and 3.5, the project draft should be finalized in its definitive configuration, quantitativelyevaluated as well performing for all the different disciplines. The overall setting of the project should befinalized in its scale 1:200. Some details should be studied and developed zooming in and out from theproject scales.During week 3.6 and 3.7, the detailed design should be finalized and detailed calculations should bemade for each discipline. The overall project should be finalized from the urban setting 1:1000 to the entireset of details 1:20.After the end of the course, before the submission of the final deliverables, further improvements can bemade in the design; also by integrating the feedbacks extracted from the detailed performance simulations.Exams and gradesThe grade to each student will be given:- 50% based on the final product as a whole (the overall final design product). This grade is the same foreach student in one team and is given by all Instructors. 15
  15. 15. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students- 50% based on the individual work the student developed for his/her specific discipline - this grade isindividual for each student and is given by the instructor of the discipline.(At the end of the course, a meeting among instructors will be held to discuss the grades.)For the members of each student team, grades are calculated by using the following excel sheet. This willbe explained in detail at the beginning of the course.Figure 4 – Template for calculating the individual grades.Please note: in case the tasks of Climate Design are transversally distributed across the other disciplines(teams of four students), the grade for Climate Design will be also given to all the team members.PresentationsThree presentations are scheduled during the course. These are on Friday afternoons: Friday 22nd ofFebruary, Friday the 15th of March and Friday the 5th of April.- During the first one, the preliminary analysis and concepts are discussed. Each student team presents twodesign concepts. One concept is chosen for each team, for further development. The two concepts per teamneed to be described in one short design vision, sharply expressing the essence of the concept. Such designintentions must be possible to be summarized in one clear sentence (or even one key word) and an abstractsketch. This is common to the whole team. By referring to it, the rest of the presentation is individual foreach team member. The architect, the structural designer, the envelope designer, the design informaticsexpert and the climate designer will present one by one the concepts for their specific disciplines (thearchitectural concept, the structural concept, the envelope concepts, the digital strategy, and the climateconcept).- During the second one, the definitive setting of the project 1:200 is discussed, including the preliminarystudies on the detailing. Performance need to be discussed based on numeric values.- During the third one, the final results are discussed. Also in this case, after a common introduction,presentations will run individually. They will constitute integral part of the individual grade given to eachteam member singularly. Based on the comments and feedbacks received during the last presentation, thefinal results can still be adjusted before writing the final reports and submitting the final deliverables.The design teams will discuss their proposals in front of a number of external reviewers. The challenge foreach team is to convince them about the suitability of its design proposal, by making use of the numericanalysis performed during the design process. Tables summarizing the numeric results can be used for acomparison between the different options.Figure 6 – Final presentation for the XXL Workshop 2011 16
  16. 16. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for StudentsFinal deliverablesThe final deliverables include the final reports, drawings and physical prototypes.- Final reports (to be delivered by Tuesday 16th of April before h.9.00am):Content of the report: The reports are meant to present the design concept, the integrated process, and thefinal project. In an appendix of the report, the architectural drawings are provided; including plans andsections 1:500 with eventual selected zooms 1:100 - and some key detail 1:20. These have a reduced sizeto fit a A3 format.Structure of the report: After a general introduction on the project and process, each discipline should havea separated section. The general introduction is up to the entire group. The sections for architectural design,structural design, envelope design, climate design and design informatics are up to each expertindividually. For each specific discipline the requirements for the report are presented in Table 5.- Physical models and A1 printed drawings (to be delivered before Friday the 19th of Aprilh.10.00):a) The Physical model can be limited to a meaningful portion of the project.Content of the model: The models should catch the essence of the design proposal, and clearly express thedesign concept. If strongly meaningful, models can be conceptual and abstraction is welcome - however, atwhatever level of detail models are developed, the key contributions from the different disciplines mustbe included and expressed in the model (with emphasis on the way you achieved a synthesis ofcontributions toward the design concept).Size of the model, means and organization for production: Models are expected around 600mm X 500-200mm X 300mm - scales 1:100 or 1:200 are suggested. Students are welcome to use the techniques andmaterials that suit the most their design concept. Please note that when using the small laser cutter inTUDelft CamLab is available, max size is: 600mm X 300mm. The booking of the materials is up to studentsand should be done at least 2-3 days before the use of the laser cut. During laser cutting, assistance will beprovided. Instructions for preparing the files are available on-line:http://wiki.bk.tudelft.nl/toi-pedia/Lasercuttinghttp://www.tudelft-architecture.nl/chairs/form-modelling-studies/education/modelling-techniques/pages/camlabLaser cutting must be planned in advance to distribute your activities along the available time, especially inthe last weeks before the exams. Please, the Computational Designer of each group should submit a pre-planning of the laser cutting activities by Friday 29th March. Impossibilities in using the machine due tomissed planning will be not consider reasons for possible delays.Figure 7 – physical models by students of XXL Workshop 2011 17
  17. 17. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Studentsb) A1 printed drawings includes:- One A1 poster: o Capturing the overall essence of the design; this poster should illustrate the contributions from all the five disciplines. In case of exhibitions, this is the poster that will be used.- Architectural drawings: o Design of surroundings + infrastructure - 1:1000; o Relevant plans, elevations, and sections - scale 1:500;- Structural Design drawings: o Principles of the chosen load-bearing system - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the load-bearing system - 1:200 and 1:20;- Envelope Design Drawings: o Principles of the chosen envelope system - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the envelope system - 1:200 and 1:20;- Climate Design Drawings: o Principles of the chosen climate strategy - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the energy-related climate system - 1:200 and 1:20.Figure 8 – Overall view, concept and examples of details (XXL Workshop 2012) 18
  18. 18. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Table 5 XXL architectural design, required content report The report should describe not only the final architectural results, but also the process through which the results have been achieved. The decision making process should be presented and argued, with emphasis on collaborative design. The integration and elaborations of inputs coming from other disciplines as well as the feedbacks from architectural design to other disciplines should be discussed. Such approach is expected from the early design to the detailed design and should be presented across the whole process. The process should be described in its various phases: - analysis of the context and of design requirements - constraints, principles and potentials to enhance - definition and elaboration of the concept: iterative process of conception, testing/evaluating, integration of feedbacks in design developments - final design The overall design has to be described by including the different criteria required for the design of a stadium. However the main focus should be kept on the functional flexibility, which is a priority in terms of design exploration; the concept should be presented with clear approach toward this challenge. Also, considering the impossibility to exhaustively develop the design in all its aspects, a clear selection of goals and targets should be taken as priorities and used as drivers in presenting the design. The architectural drawings and a proper representation of the project (from concept to details) have to be included. XXL structural design, required content report Each design must be calculated for interpretation purposes and as check. This is also required for your (computer) calculations and should be included in the report. Load cases for interpretation: To be able to interpret correctly the structural behaviour, the flow of forces (i.e. how the loads are transferred via the internal forces to the supports and their reaction forces) of an individual load it is required to calculate each load as an individual load case. - Explanation of structural behavior, flow of forces Explain in the report based on the calculations the structural behaviour (flow of forces) of the structure. Use for this interpretation the internal forces and the reaction forces (the deformations can also provide additional information). Load cases as check: To be able to check a structure on serviceability and safety (ultimate limit) different loads should be combined in one single load case for calculation, for example dead load and wind combined etc. - Serviceability Limit State To satisfy the serviceability limit state criteria, a structure must remain functional for its intended use subject to routine (read: everyday) loading, and as such the structure must not cause occupant discomfort under routine conditions. To satisfy this limit state, check if the maximum deformations do not exceed the required limits; include these in the report. - Ultimate Limit State To satisfy the ultimate limit state, the structure must not collapse when subjected to the peak design load for which it was designed. To satisfy this limit state, check if the maximum stresses do not exceed the required limits (ultimate stress); include these in the report. Content report:- drawings of the structural design- schematization of the structure as basis for the (computer) calculations, deduced from the design drawings- input for the calculations: 19
  19. 19. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students o mesh type o materials o section properties o loads (for use of the different load cases see text above) o constraints (incl. boundary conditions) o analysis type (e.g. static linear / non-linear / form-finding etc.)- analysis of the results: o explanation of structural behavior, flow of forces (see text above) o serviceability limit state (see text above) o ultimate limit state check (see text above) o output (use these for explaining the structural behavior, flow of forces and both the limit states check):  displacements / deformations  support reactions  internal forces  stresses- conclusions including suggested improvements on the basis of the analysis results- drawings of important details in principle of the structure consulted literature XXL envelope design, required content report The building envelope is to a large extend for the architectural expression of the building and seen as a component of the climate design concept. It is highly integrated with the structural design. The report by the Building Envelope Design Expert should include: Written report containing the following: - Introduction - Description of façade concept in relation to structural and climatic design of the stadium, structural concept of façade, water drainage system, choice of materials - Examples of similar facades - Description of production, building sequence and fixing methods - Critical discussion of the result and possible further research needed. Drawings The drawings will build up on the architectural elevations and sections. The following drawings are required of all major different envelope typologies: - Sections and elevations 1/20 - Details 1/10 to 1/5 - Explanatory sketches - Sketches of the building sequence - Sketches of function principle if adaptive concepts are chosen The drawings must include measurements, gridlines, chosen materials and systems, fixing principles and interface strategies to adjacent building components. XXL computational design, required content report The report by the Computational Designer should illustrate: - The design exploration strategy/strategies that have been set and developed. The specific parameterization strategies of the parametric models, according to the design exploration strategies. - The digital design process he/she organized for the work flow of the interdisciplinary team (strategies for digital modeling, loops between geometry and performance analysis, file exchange, including file formats and plug-ins that have been used, etc.), with emphasis on BIM principles (flow of data and 20
  20. 20. XXL WORKSHOP 2013 Design and Research Guidelines for Students geometry from the single models to the core model and vice versa). The report should include personal and critical reflection on the advantages or challenges of the process.- The specific work more deeply developed for his/her own computational topic.Further specifications to detail the three points mentioned above are formulated as following:  A holistic phase model of the design process plus a technical flowchart of the core computational process.  A thorough description of ‘design problem formulation’: how the design task is formulated in relation to design goals.  A characterization of ‘design variables’ amongst all the other parameters  A list of ‘design constraints’ and the way they have been satisfied.  An overview of performance evaluation methodology: how the quality of design has been measured and evaluated as to the design goals.  A description of the ‘design methodology’ as the structured collection of methods used to achieve the design goals (feed-forward/feed-back in general, and the specific problem solving methods).- The archive organization/structure in Dropbox and the archive organization/structure in InfoBase. (Please, do organize InfoBase with the final material of your team, by preparing all the folders and uploading the files). The file naming both in DropBox and InfoBase.- The work for CNC prototyping/manufacturing, not only as technical process, but also by critically reflecting on the advantages or challenges in using them as design tools (and not only presentation tools).One or more appendixes are welcome, illustrating in details the GH models as well as the eventual codes(VB or C#) for scripting or programming.XXL climate design, required content reportThe report by the Climate Designer should clearly illustrate:- The development of the design from a holistic perspective on sustainability. It is important to illustrate why certain design choices have been made and how these relate to sustainability in general. The focus can be on CO2-neutrality, energy-neutrality, energy generation, water flows, material use, social sustainability, biodiversity, etc.- A description and graphic presentation of the design decisions that relate to the development of an energy-neutral ice arena including the systems used to achieve the required climate (temperatures; humidity; light). Moreover, the climate design expert should substantiate with simulations to what extent the design task of energy-neutrality has been achieved.- A description and graphic presentation of the design decisions that relate to sustainable energy- generation. Calculations should be used to determine the amount of energy generated in this way.- A description and graphic presentation of the general strategy that leads to a sustainable use of materials; moreover, a brief overview of used materials and how these can be considered sustainable should be given. The material choices should be supported by data from the NIBE catalogue available through the website of TUDelft’s library.- A description of the acoustic principles considered in the design. You can follow the events of the course at www.xxl2013.blogspot.com You can join our FaceBook Group XXL Workshop - TUDelft for open discussion www.facebook.com/groups/339034762881713/ You can see the events of the previous courses at www.xxl2011.blogspot.com and www.xxl2012.blogspot.com 21
  21. 21. studio MSc BT/AE lecture workshop presentation/deadline excursionor Specified Zaal Specified Zaal Specified Zaal Specified Zaal project siteWhen the following titles are present, the consult is manditory for the students responsible of that discipline; the other team members are welcome to join the consult, but not required to.(A) (DI) (SD) (ED) (CD)Group Architect Group Design Informatics Expert Group Structural Designer Group Envelope Designer Group Climate DesignerWeek 3.1: February 12 - February 15 Tuesday 12/2 Wednesday 13/2 Thursday 14/2 Friday 15/2 * Excursion project site 13th February 08:45 - 09:30 1 Opening & Organization Excursion to project site in Heereveen Energy efficiency Structural Mechanics 07:30 Meeting at TUDelft (leaving by bus) 09:45 - 10:30 2 M.Turrin BK 01 West 0.60 M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Steven Lobregt - Sparkling Projects TBM-F A. Borgart BK-Instructiezaal Q 10.30-10.40 Arrival at Thialf 10:45 - 11:30 3 Architectural Design Lectures by: Rapid Prototyping Structural Design 11.00-13.30 Lecture by Breert Boomsma - Thialf 11:45 - 12:30 4 M.Turrin - P.de Ruiter BK 01 West 0.60 Breert Boomsma - Thialf P.de Ruiter TBM-F J. Paul BK-Instructiezaal Q Lecture by Haaije Jorritsma - Heereveen Municip. Haaije Jorritsma - Heereveen Municip. Lecture by Gerry Meagher - Alynia Architects 13:45 - 14:30 5 Project startup Gerry Meagher - Alynia Architects Climate Design Consult (ALL) Structural Design of Thialf 45 min Lecture by Gerwin Venema - Fryslan Province 14:45 - 15:30 6 M.Turrin BK-Instructiezaal X Gerwin Venema - Fryslan Province M. Tenpierik / C. Martin BK-Instructiezaal P Rob Nijsse - TUDelft BK-Instructiezaal Q 13.30-14.00 Break 15:45 - 16:30 7 NURBS parametric design workshop Architectural Design Consult (ALL) Structural Design Consult (ALL) 14.00 Visit to ice rink and faciliites 16:45 - 17:30 8 P. Nourian BK-Instructiezaal X * Details M.Turrin / P.de Ruiter BK-Instructiezaal P J.Paul and A. Borgart BK-Instructiezaal Q 15.30 Departure by busWeek 3.2: February 19 - February 22 Tuesday 19/2 Wednesday 20/2 Thursday 21/2 Friday 22/2 ** Pin up presentation 22nd February - IO-Emile Truijen 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Computational Design Parametric Performance-oriented design Structural Design Consult (SD) Each group presents 2 conceptual designs. Each discipline is presented in each concept. 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein BK-Collegezaal C H.Hubers BK-Instructiezaal R M.Turrin BK-Instructiezaal Q J. Paul and A. Borgart For each concept, each team should make a presentation of about 6 slides. One slide presents 10:45 - 11:30 3 Envelope Design Consult (ALL) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop Studio the overall vision of the concept. Five slides are for the five disciplines in the concept. 11:45 - 12:30 4 T. Klein P. Nourian BK-Instructiezaal R Each team will use two different screens paralelly: one per concept. 12:30 - 13:45 14.00-14.05 Welcome 14.05-14.25 presentation 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop Architectural Design Consult (A) Pin up Presentation and Lectures 14.25-14.45 comments 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin P. Nourian M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter 14.45-15.05 presentation 15:45 - 16:30 7 Two alternative concepts for each group 15.05-15.25 comments 16:45 - 17:30 8 BK-Collegezaal A ** Details IO-Emile Truijen 15.25-15.45 presentation 15.45-16.05 commentsWeek 3.3: February 26 - March 1 16.05-16.30 Coffee Break Tuesday 26/2 Wednesday 27/2 Thursday 28/2 Friday 1/3 16.30-17.15 Lecture by Bige Tuncer 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Computational Design Consult (DI) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop 17.15-18.00 Lecture to be confirmed 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein P. Nourian, H. Hubers Studio P. Nourian BK-Instructiezaal P 18.00-18.05 Closing 10:45 - 11:30 3 Iterative loops in design informatics 11:45 - 12:30 4 I. Chatzikonstantinou BK-Instructiezaal P 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.4: March 5 - March 8 Tuesday 5/3 Wednesday 6/3 Thursday 7/3 Friday 8/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Computational Design Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein P. Nourian, H. Hubers Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.5: March 12 - March 15 Tuesday 12/3 Wednesday 13/3 Thursday 14/3 Friday 15/3 *** Mid Term presentations 15th March -IO-Emile Truijen 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Computational Design Consult (DI) Structural Design Consult (SD) 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein P. Nourian, H. Hubers Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 14.00-14.05 Welcome 10:45 - 11:30 3 14.05-14.25 presentation 11:45 - 12:30 4 14.25-14.45 comments 14.45-15.05 presentation 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Architectural Design Consult (A) Mid Term Presentations and Lectures 15.05-15.25 comments 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Studio 15.25-15.45 presentation 15:45 - 16:30 7 15.45-16.05 comments 16:45 - 17:30 8 *** Details IO-Emile Truijen 16.05-16.30 Coffee Break 16.30-17.15 Lecture by Marcel de Boer - ARUPWeek 3.6: March 19 - March 22 17.15-18.00 Lecture to be confirmed Tuesday 19/3 Wednesday 20/3 Thursday 21/3 Friday 22/3 18.00-18.05 Closing 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Computational Design Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein P. Nourian, H. Hubers Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.7: March 26 - March 29 Tuesday 26/3 Wednesday 27/3 Thursday 28/3 Friday 29/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Computational Design Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 T. Klein P. Nourian, H. Hubers Studio No Education 10:45 - 11:30 3 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Climate Design Consult (CD) Architectural Design Consult (A) 14:45 - 15:30 6 M. Tenpierik / C. Martin M.Turrin, P.de Ruiter Studio No Education 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.8: Transition Week - April 2 - April 5 Tuesday 2/4 Wednesday 3/4 Thursday 4/4 Friday 5/4 **** Final prentations 5th April - collegezaal F 08:45 - 09:30 1 09:45 - 10:30 2 Transition week Transition week Transition week Transition week 14.00-14.05 Welcome 10:45 - 11:30 3 14.05-14.25 presentation 11:45 - 12:30 4 14.25-14.45 comments 14.45-15.05 presentation 13:45 - 14:30 5 Final Presentations 15.05-15.25 comments 14:45 - 15:30 6 Transition week Transition week Transition week 15.25-15.45 presentation 15:45 - 16:30 7 15.45-16.05 comments 16:45 - 17:30 8 **** Details Zaal F 16.05-16.15 ClosingWeek 3.9: exams - April 9 - April 12 Tuesday 3/4 Wednesday 4/4 Thursday 5/4 Friday 6/4 08:45 - 09:30 1 09:45 - 10:30 2 10:45 - 11:30 3 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 14:45 - 15:30 6 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Weeks 3.10: Examinations - April 16 - April 19 Tuesday 16/4 Wednesday 17/4 Thursday 18/4 Friday 19/4 08:45 - 09:30 1 before h. 9.00 am Before 10.00 am Deadline final deliverables 09:45 - 10:30 2 Deadline final deliverables (posters, physical models) 10:45 - 11:30 3 (final reports) MEETING FOR INSTRUCTORS: GRADES 11:45 - 12:30 4 Zaal to be given 13:45 - 14:30 5 14:45 - 15:30 6 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8
  22. 22. XXL Workshop 2013 – Team and contributionsProf.dr.ir. Sevil Sarıyıldız Arch. Michela Turrin Prof.Dr.ir. Joop Paul ir. Andrew BorgartHead Chair TOI Course Coordinator Course Responsible Course ResponsibleTU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / ArchitecturalEngineering+ Technology Engineering+ Technology Engineering+ Technology Engineering+ TechnologyFaculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of ArchitectureRoom 01.West .040 Room 01.West .030 Room +01.West .130 Room 01.West .020Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 1342628 BL Delft 2628 BL Delft 2628 BL Delft 2628 BL DelftThe Netherlands The Netherlands The Netherlands The NetherlandsE I.S.Sariyildiz@tudelft.nl E M.Turrin@tudelft.nl E J.C.Paul@tudelft.nl E A.Borgart@tudelft.nlir. Tillmann Klein ir. Paul de Ruiter ir. Pirouz Nourian Dr.ir. Hans HubersCourse Responsible Architectural Design Computational Design Computational DesignTU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / ArchitecturalEngineering+ Technology Engineering+ Technology Engineering+ Technology Engineering+ TechnologyFaculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of ArchitectureRoom 01.West .130 Room 01.West .030 Room 01.West .080 Room 01.West .080Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 134 Julianalaan 1342628 BL Delft 2628 BL Delft 2628 BL Delft 2628 BL DelftThe Netherlands The Netherlands The Netherlands The NetherlandsE T.Klein@tudelft.nl E P.deRuiter@tudelft.nl E P.deRuiter@tudelft.nl E J.C.Hubers@tudelft.nlDr. ir. Martin Tenpierik (Replacement to be given) Ir. Steven Lobregt Ir. Marcel de BoerClimate Design Climate Design (External Contribution) (External Contribution)TU Delft / Architectural TU Delft / Architectural Sparkling Projects ArupEngineering+ Technology Engineering+ Technology Ecofactorij 18 Beta Build, Naritaweg 118Faculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture 7325 WC Apeldoorn 1043 CA AmsterdamRoom 01+.West.210 Room 01+.West.210 The Netherlands The NetherlandsJulianalaan 134 Julianalaan 134 T +31 (0)55 5401910 T+31 (0) 20 305 85002628 BL Delft 2628 BL Delft E info@sparklingprojects.nl E amsterdam@arup.comThe Netherlands The NetherlandsE M.J.Tenpierik@tudelft.nl E ** @tudelft.nl
  23. 23. Breert Boomsma Arch. Gerry Meagher Haaije Jorritsma Gerwin Venema(External Contribution) (External Contribution) (External Contribution) (External Contribution) Gemeente Heerenveen Fryslan ProvinceThialf B.V. Alynia Architecten Crackstraat 2 Tweebaksmarkt 52,Pim Mulierlaan 1 Noorderhaven 47 8441 ES Heerenveen 8911 KZ Leeuwarden,8443 DA Heerenveen 8860 AD Harlingen The Netherlands The NetherlandsThe Netherlands The Netherlands T +31 (0)513 617 617 T +31(0)582925925T +31 (0) 513 63 77 00 T +31 (0)517 413 333 gemeente@heerenveen.nl E provincie@fryslan.nlinfo@thialf.nl info@alynia-architecten.nlir. arch. Ioannis Dr.Bige Tuncer Dr. Mine Ozkar Dr. Rudi StouffsChatzikonstantinou (On-line Contribution) (On-line Contribution) (On-line Contribution)(On-line Contribution)Yasar University MIT / SUTD MIT / ITU TU Delft / NUSFaculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of Architecture Faculty of ArchitectureIzmir, Turkey USA, Singapore USA, Turkey The Netherlands, Singaporei.chatzikonstantinou@yasar. E E.B.Tuncer@tudelft.nl E ozkar@itu.edu.tr E stouffs@nus.edu.sgedu.tr

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