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XXL Workshop 2012 - guidelines and schedule
 

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Guidelines and Schedule for the 2012 Edition of the XXL Workshop - held at TUDelft, Faculty of Architecture - 7th February to 20th April 2012

Guidelines and Schedule for the 2012 Edition of the XXL Workshop - held at TUDelft, Faculty of Architecture - 7th February to 20th April 2012

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    XXL Workshop 2012 - guidelines and schedule XXL Workshop 2012 - guidelines and schedule Document Transcript

    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students    TUDelft ContactsCoordination:Arch. Michela TurrinRoom 01.West .030Tel 0629321839E-mail M.Turrin@tudelft.nlArchitectural Design:Prof.dr. Sevil Sariyildiz ir. Paul de RuiterRoom 01.West .040 Room 01.West .080E-mail I.S.Sariyildiz@tudelft.nl E-mail P.deRuiter@tudelft.nlStructural Design:ir. Andrew Borgart Prof.dr. Joop PaulRoom 01.West .020 Room 01+.West .130E-mail: A.Borgart@tudelft.nl E-mail: J.C.Paul@tudelft.nlEnvelope Design:ir. T. KleinRoom 01.West .130E-mail: T.Klein@tudelft.nlDesign Informatics:Arch. Michela Turrin ir. Pirouz Nourian Arch.ir Yannis ChatzikonstantinouRoom 01.West .030 Room 01.West .080 Room 01.West.0E-mail M.Turrin@tudelft.nl E-mail P.Nourian@tudelft.nl   I.Chatzikonstantinou@tudelft.nlClimate Design:Dr.ir.Arjan van Timmeren Dr.ir.Martin Tempierik To be givenRoom 01+.West .170 Room 01+.West .210E-mail: A.vanTimmeren@tudelft.nl E-mail: M.J.Tenpierik@tudelft.nlSpecial tanks for the vital contributions to the course preparation and development to:Bas Burgers, Manager at The Kuip - RotterdamFrank Werner, Associate Architect at KCAP – RotterdamBart Wubben, Landscape Architect at dS+V - Rotterdam 2
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Content:Introduction ……………………………………………………… 4Course objectives ……………………………………………… 4Design Exercise ………………………………………………… 4Design Team ……………………………………………………… 6Disciplines and Objectives ………………………………… 6Common and Individual Activities …………………… 7Weekly program ………………………………………………… 11Exams and grades ……………………………………………… 12Presentations …………………………………………………… 12Final deliverables ……………………………………………… 13Detailed Schedule ……………………………………………… 17 3
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students IntroductionThe XXL workshop is concerned with the design, computation, engineering, and production of a horizontallarge span building structure. This design process is done as a collaborative digital design in amultidisciplinary group of students in which each student has his/her own different responsibility. Thecollaborative digital design requires an integrated 3D approach with BIM (Building Information Modeling),performance analysis, and file to factory processes.Course objectivesThe course focuses on Integrated Design. The interdisciplinary integration of the various fields of expertiseinvolved in the design process drives the activities of the course and will be evaluated and graded as a keyaspect. The integrated design process is applied for the design of a Stadium, as described in the followingsection.Figure 1 – Examples of projects and performance simulations by the students of XXL Workshop 2011.Design ExerciseThe design exercise focuses on a large span structure for a stadium, De Kuip in Rotterdam. Two alternativeswill be included: the redesign of the current Stadium and the design of an entirely new Stadium along theriver. Students will be asked to work some on one option, some on the other. Additional information on thetwo locations is provided at the beginning of the course, through a guided visit on the project sites andlectures on the subject.Figure 2 – Image (Courtesy of KCAP, copyright of KCAP) and pictures of the project locations. 4
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students The student teams working on the two different options engage to demonstrate the suitability of their owndesign option. Besides the aesthetic criteria of an appealing design solution, a set of numeric criteria aregiven for a final comparison between the options. The criteria are listed in Table1 and belong to the fields offunctional flexibility and sustainability of the design proposal. During the final presentation the teams willdiscuss their proposals in front of a number of external reviewers from practice, from RotterdamMunicipality and from the The Kuip/Feyernoord, acting as their hypothetical client. The challenge for eachteam is to convince them about the suitability of its design proposal, by making use of the numeric analysisperformed during the design process. Tables summarizing the numeric results will be used for a comparisonbetween the different options.In both options, sustainability and functional flexibility are the key requirements. Focusing on sustainability,the amount of needed material and the energy efficiency of the building are the key criteria. Focusing onflexibility, reducing the time in which the stadium is unused and integrating the stadium in the citizen’s dailylife are the key criteria. More specific requirements on the need of functional flexibility are given herefollowing.In both options, the Stadium should be designed in order to reduce or even eliminate the time inwhich the building remains unused. This is a challenge. Usually, large stadia are used only in occasionof very big events, occurring once in a while. Smaller and local events mostly do not take place intraditional large stadia, since events happening with high number of empty seats look a failure. In XXL, thissituation must be avoided. The XXL design teams are asked to deal with the challenge of accommodatingevents at different sizes, always allowing a “fully booked” location. Also, besides local as well asinternational football matches, the stadium should be able to guest a set of additional sport and leisureactivities, in order to increase the most its daily use. This has to occur without affecting the needs of thefootball matches (such as the proper conditions of the grass). The building needs to be conceived byproposing a design solution integrated with the daily life of the citizens. Integration with the city is highlyexpected and the building should relate to the urban context as well as support the urban daily life. Tosummarize, the stadium should be designed in order to allow the successful accommodation of: A. local as well as international football matches, with a maximum capacity of 70.000 spectators; B. local as well as international sport and leisure events, including daily activities integrated in the local urban life of the Rotterdam’s citizens.Focusing on the requirements for football matches (A), the new Stadium should accommodate a set of basicgiven functions, to be located under and around the tribunes. These functions include facilities, service andrestoration areas, press and guests rooms, etc. In the case of international football matches, the basicfunctions are summarized in the FIFA World Cup™ space requirements and will be further discussed duringthe introduction of the course. A parametric setting of the tribunes will be given and developed during a oneday workshop, in order to explore different configurations while still respecting the regulations and visualrequirements. Figure 3 illustrates a plan for the tribunes designed by KCAP for the New Kuip.Figure 3 – Courtesy of KCAP Architects, Rotterdam. A plan for the tribunes of the New Kuip in Rotterdam. 5
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Focusing on other sport and leisure events (B), the main challenge of the design exercise deals with: a) The adaptability (by means of reconfiguration, subdivision or other strategies) of the field area in order to accommodate the events; b) The adaptability (by means of reconfiguration, subdivision or other strategies) of the tribunes in order to match the requirements (such as different capacities, visual requirements, etc.) of the events; c) The design of a roof able to satisfy the requirements of the different events. d) The integration with the spaces and functions under and around the tribunes.The ultimate goal is minimizing the weekly number of expected hours in which the bowl and the field remainunused. The strategies to approach the challenge can be organized based on (1) Multi-functionality; (2) Re-arrangement/reorganization; (3) Extendibility; (4) Demountability; (5) Internal flexibility/Adaptability. Thefield, the tribunes and the roof have to be designed in order to achieve the flexibility of these spaces. Theiradaptability is crucial and can be achieved by means of mobile partitions, reconfigurable structures, slidingand adjustable parts, dismountable components, or any other principles based on static or adjustableelements.With this general context, the final criteria based on which the design proposals will be compared aresummarized in the following Table 1.Table 1Criteria for sustainabilityAmount of material and “End-of-Life” Aiming at minimizing the needed material; aiming at maximizingprinciples for structure the end-of-life- re-usability/demountability.Amount of Material and “End-of-Life” Aiming at minimizing the needed material; and, moreprinciples for envelope importantly for cladding, aiming at maximizing the end-of-life- re-usability/demountability.Energy Aiming at minimizing the energy for thermal and light comfort; ato Needed Energy (for climate comfort) maximizing the energy produced in the building; at maximizingo Produced Energy the balance between the energy produced minus the energyo Final Energy Gain needed for the climatic control of the building.Criteria for functional flexibilityHours of unused bowl Aiming at minimizing the weekly number of expected hours in which the bowl remains unused.Design TeamThe design process is developed based on the interdisciplinary activity of a design team composed by 5students. Each student will be responsible for one discipline. The work is structured according to fivedisciplines, corresponding to five roles in the team. The design and research objectives for each disciplineare described here following.Please note: in case of teams with four students, the tasks of Climate Design will be distributedtransversally, across the other disciplines.Disciplines and ObjectivesThe design and research objectives for each discipline can be described as following. Additional informationis provided at the beginning of the course based on lectures focusing on each single discipline.Table 2Architectural Instructors: Prof.dr. S. Sariyildiz; ir. Paul de RuiterDesign The objective is the design of a functionally flexible Stadium. The field area, tribunes and roof have to be designed based on innovative ideas for functional adaptivity. The spaces around the bowl are designed based on a set of pre-defined functions, for which 6
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students  integration and use in case of different events is required. In order to favor the adaptivity, the field, tribunes and roof can be conceived based on reconfigurablility. Reconfigurability is meant to allow both occasional events with exceptionally high number of spectators and minor events with limited public. These need to be held by guaranteeing the absence of empty seats/areas for public. In doing this, the architectural design process is supposed to integrate inputs from the different disciplines since its early concept.Envelope Instructor: ir. T. KleinDesign The objective is the design of an envelope system deeply integrated with the Architectural concept and beneficial for a sustainable climate design of the Stadium. Attention to the total amount of needed material is recommended.Structural Instructors: Prof.Dr.ir. J. Paul; ir. A. BorgartDesign The objective is the design of an innovative and efficient structural system for a large span Stadium. The proposed structure may be reconfigurable to favor the functional adaptivity of the Stadium. Attention to the total amount of needed material is recommended.Design Instructors: Arch. M. Turrin; ir. Pirouz Nourian; Arch.ir. Yannis ChatzikonstantinouInformatics The objective is the conception and development of a digital and computational strategy to create an integrated multidisciplinary design process. This includes strategies for digital parametric modeling, loops between geometry and performance analysis, integration of prototyping, file exchange and archiving.Climate Design Instructors: Dr.ir. A. van Timmeren; Dr.ir. M. Tenpierik The objective is the conception and development of an energy efficient Stadium, by means of passive and active use of on-site energy resources. The Stadium should have limited energy consumption for climate control as well as be designed as an energy producing building, based on renewable sources. Focus is given to energy reduction, energy-efficient climate systems, possible re-use of waste energy and sustainable energy production. Attention will be required also to the use of materials.Common and Individual ActivitiesThe whole team and the shared goals of its activities are described in Table 3. The specificities of eachdiscipline are described in Table 4.Table 3TEAM TEAM ACTIVITYArchitectural The whole team develops the design solution based on close collaboration andDesigner interdisciplinary integration. Each team member is responsible for his/her own discipline, as part of the whole integrated process. The process is based on the convergence ofEnvelope each discipline into the development of the final design solution. The concepts for theDesigner whole architectural, envelope, structural, climate designs, and computational processStructural need to be conceived from the very beginning as part of one overall picture. Defining theDesigner overall picture of the design and developing it along the entire process is responsibility of the whole team.DesignInformatics As part of this overall picture, each team member is then responsible to develop theExpert specificities of his/her own discipline. The contributions of each discipline should be multidirectional. Each discipline is expected to contribute to the whole design by bothClimate taking inputs from and providing inputs to the other disciplines, according to the wholeDesigner design. Also, each discipline is expected to affect the design solution such that the final design will fully integrate inputs from each discipline. This interdisciplinary collaboration is expected during all the phases of the design process (from the conceptual design to the detailed design). It should occur at all the scales of the project (from the large scale of the overall Stadium to the small scale of the components). 7
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students  During the whole process, the team approaches the tasks by means of:  Integrated multidisciplinary design process;  Use and production of physical working models;  Use of numeric performance analysis, computational geometry, digital information management.Table 4TEAM JOB DESCRIPTIONMEMBERSArchitectural The architect of the team is expected to develop and guide the architectural concept ofDesigner the project along the entire design process. He/she is expected to develop the aesthetics values of the project, by proposing a personal approach on form, detailing and styling. This must be done by converging inputs from the different disciplines into a coherent overall style of the project. He/she is also expected to have the overall vision and control of the project by guaranteeing the fulfillment of the functional requirements as well as of all the other architectural performances. Focusing on the requirement of functional adaptivity, the architect is specifically expected to challenge the potentials of reconfigurability in architecture. This is intended as a means to explore architectural concepts based on adaptability for functional requirements. Focusing on these aspects, the architect is expected to coordinate the design decisions across the different disciplines. Each team member is responsible for his own discipline, and the convergence of each discipline into a good design process will be up to everyone. However, the architect will have a key role in guiding and addressing this convergence within the whole vision of the project. The tasks to be achieved during the process can be summarized as following:  analysis and understanding of the whole architectural program of the project;  overall vision of design concepts;  iteratively looped assessment/evaluation and review of the design considering the architectural performances (visual/aesthetic, functional adaptable, etc);  integration of interdisciplinary aspects into the whole design from the very early conceptual phase and during the entire design process.Envelope The envelope designer is expected to develop the design of the envelope for theDesigner Stadium. He/she is supposed to address both material and geometric solutions of the envelope since the very early phase of the process. His/her role should be effective since the very early stage of the conceptual design, by means of integrated design. Early integration is needed for various aspects: - The skin of the project is supposed to be a key aspect of the design concept of the stadium; by early exploring different ideas on the envelope system, the envelope designer is supposed to provide inputs for the Architectural concepts. - The envelope will act as key feature in filtering, controlling and using the environmental factors as energy resources and needs specific attention for Climate Design. - The envelope needs to be conceived in conjunction with the Structural system. During the whole integrated process, the envelope designer is responsible for developing a well performing skin. Performance to be evaluated includes the numerous requirements that an envelope is expected to satisfy. Specific attention is given to the need of functional adaptivity in architecture, for which the envelope might have to be reconfigurable. Also, attention is needed for a sustainable control of climatic aspects. 8
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students  The envelope designer is expected to address these challenges along the whole design process and across different scales. Continuous zoom in and out from the various project scales are required during the entire design process of the envelope. This ranges from the large scale of the overall geometry, to the small scale of the single components and vice versa, in a continuous loop of assessments and performance evaluations (such as through energy calculations, fabrication plans, material use, etc.). For the conception and development of a performative envelope (analysis driven design), the tasks to be achieved based on numeric performance evaluations are:  passive solar performance  energy production  material use and quantities  fabrication process.Structural The structural designer is responsible for conceiving and developing the structuraldesigner system of the Stadium. He/she is supposed to address both material and geometric solutions since the very early phase of the process. His/her role should be effective since the very early stage of the conceptual design, by means of integrated design. The structural system is a key challenge in the design of the stadium. Its concept needs to be integrated since the very early phase with the architectural concept and the envelope concept. During the whole integrated process, the structural designer is responsible for developing a well performing structural system. Performance to be evaluated includes the numerous requirements that a structural system is expected to satisfy. Specific attention is given to the need of functional adaptivity in architecture, for which the structure might have to be reconfigurable. Reconfigurability can play a key role in the conception of the structure. The structure can take a driving role in the architectural reconfiguration, as for example by means of active form structures or other systems that the structural designer is expected to explore, propose and develop. The structural system should be designed also considering aspects of sustainability. These can be considered based on evaluations on material use, quantities and properties. The integration between geometry and material properties has to be driven by the structural designer during the whole process and across the different scales. Numeric evaluations need to support each phase, including structural calculations, quantification of the needed materials, fabrication process, etc. For the conception and development of a well performative structural system (analysis driven design), the tasks to be achieved based on numeric performance evaluations are:  structural performances;  material use and quantities  fabrication processDesign The design informatics expert is responsible for the entire digital process of the design.Informatics This is intended not as a technical support but as strategy for a highly interdisciplinary,Expert integrated and performance-driven design process. Specific tasks are: a) The conception and development of the digital strategy to support the interdisciplinary exploration of the design solutions. This should occur from the conceptual design to the detailed phase, across the various scales of the project. The digital design strategy needs to be developed in close collaboration with the other team members, in order to be tailored on the specific design goals. The digital design strategy should enhance the potentials of the tools used in the process. Specifically these are parametric modeling (as a means to support the generation of geometric alternatives) and supports for performance evaluations (mainly, but not only, intended as digital simulations). Parametric geometric alternatives should be generated according to a meaningful strategy for design exploration. The 9
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students  parameterization process is a crucial part of the strategy and needs to be set accordingly and meaningfully. The performance evaluations can be used to explore the design alternatives toward the definition of a well performing solution. According to the different design strategies, digital tools can be highly customized based on the definition on the specificities of each design process and goal. b) During the whole design process, the design informatics expert is responsible also for the integration of the different digital models from the various disciplines into a core model during the entire design process (according to BIM concepts); for the archive (including structuring the archive) and file exchanges; for rapid prototyping during all the phases of the design, starting from the early conceptual design, when needed; for scripting and customizing the digital tools according to the design strategy; etc. This role consists in the conception, organization and management of the digital design process; while the specific work on the digital models will be done by all the team members. c) When this overall digital process is set, the design informatics expert will focus on a specific topic of the design, for which the computational strategy needs a particularly deep development. As part of the whole digital design process, this will become his/her own specific individual work. The tasks to be achieved during the process can be summarized as following: - Conception and Management tasks:  conception and development of a digital and computational strategy to support the interdisciplinary design conception, exploration and development;  structure and management of the file archive and exchanges;  integration of specific digital models from the different disciplines into a core model;  customization of digital tools;  rapid prototyping with CNC machines. - Conception and Production tasks:  deep development of one chosen task by means of informatics and computation.Climate The climate designer is responsible for conceiving and developing a sustainable anddesigner energy efficient climatic control (thermal and lighting comfort) of the Stadium; and possibly an overall energy balance of the Stadium during its use (in relation to climatic comfort). His/her challenge focuses on to the building-related energy, while not mandatory requirements are considered neither for the embedded energy nor for use- related energy (appliances etc.). His/her tasks can be subdivided into two main groups: a) The conception and development of strategies to reduce the energy consumption by means of passive climatic control (such as: control of solar gain; shading; ventilation for cooling; daylight; etc.); b) The conception and development of strategies to produce energy by means of active technologies (such as: photovoltaic; solar panels; wind turbines; etc.). The energy produced can be used to supply the climatic control of the stadium when passive strategies are not sufficient. By combining passive and active strategies, the climatic control of the stadium is supposed to be a Zero Energy System. The eventual remaining amount of produced energy should be supplied for the other energy consuming needs of the building. The final energy balance should be as close as possible to a Zero Energy Stadium and possibly, even an Energy Producing Stadium. Such goal should be developed since the early conceptual phase and the energy balance should be calculated through the design process, in iterative loops. Concerning the tasks involving a proper use of materials, the climate designer will make use of catalogues in order to properly support his/her decision making process (a number of catalogues will be suggested and are available - i.e. the NIBE catalogue available through the website of TUDelft’s library). 10
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Weekly programDuring Week 3.1, students are asked to familiarize with the project requirements and tasks, with thestructure of the activities of the whole team and of each team member. They are supposed to follow thelectures, learning about the site, the project, and the individual disciplines. The design teams will be formedand they will be asked to start brainstorming on two alternative conceptual designs.During Week 3.2, the main task for each team consists in finalizing the conceptual design of 2 designalternatives. Each concept should have a design vision for the overall design as well as each team membershould develop the ideas concerning his/her own specific discipline. Preliminary evaluation of the conceptsshould be presented according to each individual discipline.Paralelly to this main task, lectures and consults will take place; on the 17th of February a workshop will beheld to provide each team member with some 3D and parametric modeling skills. Students can start settingup the overall process, including some organizational aspects (for example: set up the main 3D model andthe work process, set up the information structure for information storage and exchange, i.e. in DropBoxand InfoBase; set up file naming convention; etc).At the end of the week, a pin-up presentation is held for the whole instruction team. Each team has 20minutes to present the two design concepts. Each concept must be introduced in its overall vision anddesign intention. After this short introduction, each team member must illustrate the concept for his/herspecific discipline. For each team, during the presentation, one of the two concepts will be chosen with thestudents. The choice will be made not only based on the interest and approach of the overall designintention, but also on the specific interest and feasibility for each individual discipline.Expected material for the pin-up presentations: Each team should make two presentations of about 6 slideseach one. In each of the two presentations, one slide is for presenting the overall vision of the designconcept. Five slides are for the five disciplines in the concept. The room (College Zaal F) wherepresentations will be given has two projectors and two screens. For each group, the two presentations areon the two different screens. For each discipline, ideas can be discussed both with a top down approachfrom the large scale to the detailed scale; or vice-versa with a bottom up approach, in which the details anduse of specific components and materials at the small scale suggest possible overall design directions.Eventual additional material (such as mockups) is welcome.During week 3.3, the conceptual design should be finalized into one specific project draft, whose generalperformances are quantitatively verified.The focus of each team member should be narrowed down to selected aspects only. While during the first 2weeks, broad exploration of various design directions is encouraged; during week 3 students are invited tofocus more and more on one specific design direction, by narrowing down the design explorationand strongly reducing its complexity. The design should be developed by focusing only on the key drivers ofthe chosen design direction. This should be achieved by reinforcing the integrated multidisciplinary designprocess, by means of different expertise becoming more and more focused and specific.Also, during week 3.3 performances should start being quantified, by means of cycles of performanceevaluations and simulations. The information extracted from the performance simulation should be used asfeedbacks for the design solutions and as a support of the decision making process. This should result in theintegration of simulation supports and design development, with iterative loops using numeric simulationand development cycles. On the 24th of February, a workshop will take place on iterative loops in designinformatics.The use of physical working models is strongly recommended, when they support the design process.During week 3.4 and 3.5, the project draft should be finalized in its definitive configuration, quantitativelyevaluated as well performing for all the different disciplines. The overall setting of the project should befinalized in its scale 1:200. Some details should be studied and developed zooming in and out from theproject scales.During week 3.6 and 3.7, the detailed design should be finalized and detailed calculations should bemade for each discipline. The overall project should be finalized from the urban setting 1:1000 to the entireset of details 1:20.After the end of the course, before the submission of the final deliverables, further improvements can bemade in the design; also by integrating the feedbacks extracted from the detailed performance simulations. 11
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Exams and gradesThe grade to each student will be given 50% by the tutor of his/her own discipline - based 30% on theproduct (final design), 20% on the individual presentations and individual final deliverables (reports andother individual final deliverables). The remaining 50% of the grade is given to each student by the wholeteam of instructors, based on the design process of the team, which means the way the different expertisehave been integrated in the process.For the members of each student team, grades are calculated by using the following excel sheet. This willbe explained in detail at the beginning of the course.Figure 4 – Template for calculating the individual grades.Please note: in case the tasks of Climate Design are transversally distributed across the other disciplines(teams of four students), the grade for Climate Design will be also given to all the team members.PresentationsThree presentations are scheduled during the course. These are on Friday 17th of February (Zaal F), Fridaythe 16th of March (Room 00 BG West 150) and Thursday the 5th of April (BerlageZaal 1).- During the first one, the preliminary analysis and concepts are discussed. Each student team presents twodesign concepts. One concept is chosen for each team, for further development. The two concepts per teamneed to be described in one short design vision, sharply expressing the essence of the concept. Such designintentions must be possible to be summarized in one clear sentence (or even one key word) and an abstractsketch. This is common to the whole team. By referring to it, the rest of the presentation is individual foreach team member. The architect, the structural designer, the envelope designer, the design informaticsexpert and the climate designer will present one by one the concepts for their specific disciplines (thearchitectural concept, the structural concept, the envelope concepts, the digital strategy, and the climateconcept).- During the second one, the definitive setting of the project 1:200 is discussed, including the preliminarystudies on the detailing. Performance need to be discussed based on numeric values.- During the third one, the final results are discussed. Also in this case, after a common introduction,presentations will run individually. They will constitute integral part of the individual grade given to eachteam member singularly. Based on the comments and feedbacks received during the last presentation, thefinal results can still be adjusted before writing the final reports and submitting the final deliverables.Figure 5 – Final presentation for the XXL Workshop 2011 12
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students Final deliverablesThe final deliverables include the final reports, drawings and physical prototypes.- Final reports (to be delivered by Monday 16th of April):Content of the report: The reports are meant to present the design concept, the integrated process, and thefinal project. In an appendix of the report, the architectural drawings are provided; including plans andsections 1:500 with eventual selected zooms 1:100 - and some key detail 1:20. These have a reduced sizeto fit a A3 format.Structure of the report: After a general introduction on the project and process, each discipline should havea separated section. The general introduction is up to the entire group. The sections for architectural design,structural design, envelope design, climate design and design informatics are up to each expertindividually. For each specific discipline the requirements for the report are presented in Table 5.- Physical models and A1 printed drawings (to be delivered before Friday the 20th of Aprilh.10.00):a) The Physical model can be limited to a meaningful portion of the project.Content of the model: The models should catch the essence of the design proposal, and clearly express thedesign concept. If strongly meaningful, models can be conceptual and abstraction is welcome - however, atwhatever level of detail models are developed, the key contributions from the different disciplines mustbe included and expressed in the model (with emphasis on the way you achieved a synthesis ofcontributions toward the design concept).Size of the model, means and organization for production: Models are expected around 600mm X 500-200mm X 300mm - scales 1:100 or 1:200 are recommended. Students are welcome to use the techniquesand materials that suit the most their design concept. Please note that when using the small laser cutter inCamLab is available, max size is: 600mm X 300mm. The booking of the materials is up to students andshould be done at least 2-3 days before the use of the laser cut. During laser cutting, assistance will beprovided. Instructions for preparing the files are available on-line:http://wiki.bk.tudelft.nl/toi-pedia/Lasercuttinghttp://www.tudelft-architecture.nl/chairs/form-modelling-studies/education/modelling-techniques/pages/camlabLaser cutting must be planned in advance to distribute your activities along the available time, especially inthe last weeks before the exams. Please, the Design Informatics expert of each group should submit a pre-planning of the laser cutting activities by Friday 30th March. Impossibilities in using the machine due tomissed planning will be not consider reasons for possible delays.Figure 6 – physical models by students of XXL Workshop 2011 13
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students b) A1 printed drawings includes:- One A1 poster: o Capturing the overall essence of the design; this poster should illustrate the contributions from all the five disciplines. In case of exhibitions, this is the poster that will be used.- Architectural drawings: o Design of surroundings + infrastructure - 1:1000; o Relevant plans, elevations, and sections - scale 1:500;- Structural Design drawings: o Principles of the chosen load-bearing system - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the load-bearing system - 1:200 and 1:20;- Envelope Design Drawings: o Principles of the chosen envelope system - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the envelope system - 1:200 and 1:20;- Climate Design Drawings: o Principles of the chosen climate strategy - 1:1000 or 1:500; o Elaboration of the energy-related climate system - 1:200 and 1:20.Table 5XXL architectural design, required content reportThe report should describe not only the final architectural results, but also the process through which theresults have been achieved. The decision making process should be presented and argued, with emphasison collaborative design. The integration and elaborations of inputs coming from other disciplines as well asthe feedbacks from architectural design to other disciplines should be discussed. Such approach is expectedfrom the early design to the detailed design and should be presented across the whole process.The process should be described in its various phases: - analysis of the context and of design requirements - constraints, principles and potentials to enhance - definition and elaboration of the concept: iterative process of conception, testing/evaluating, integration of feedbacks in design developments - final designThe overall design has to be described by including the different criteria required for the design of astadium. However the main focus should be kept on the functional flexibility, which is a priority in terms ofdesign exploration; the concept should be presented with clear approach toward this challenge.Also, considering the impossibility to exhaustively develop the design in all its aspects, a clear selection ofgoals and targets should be taken as priorities and used as drivers in presenting the design.XXL structural design, required content reportEach design must be calculated for interpretation purposes and as check. This is also required for your(computer) calculations and should be included in the report.Load cases for interpretation:To be able to interpret correctly the structural behaviour, the flow of forces (i.e. how the loads aretransferred via the internal forces to the supports and their reaction forces) of an individual load it isrequired to calculate each load as an individual load case.- Explanation of structural behavior, flow of forces Explain in the report based on the calculations the structural behaviour (flow of forces) of the structure. Use for this interpretation the internal forces and the reaction forces (the deformations can also provide additional information).Load cases as check: 14
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students To be able to check a structure on serviceability and safety (ultimate limit) different loads should becombined in one single load case for calculation, for example dead load and wind combined etc.- Serviceability Limit State To satisfy the serviceability limit state criteria, a structure must remain functional for its intended use subject to routine (read: everyday) loading, and as such the structure must not cause occupant discomfort under routine conditions. To satisfy this limit state, check if the maximum deformations do not exceed the required limits; include these in the report.- Ultimate Limit State To satisfy the ultimate limit state, the structure must not collapse when subjected to the peak design load for which it was designed. To satisfy this limit state, check if the maximum stresses do not exceed the required limits (ultimate stress); include these in the report.Content report:drawings of the structural designschematization of the structure as basis for the (computer) calculations, deduced from the design drawingsinput for the calculations: o mesh type o materials o section properties o loads (for use of the different load cases see text above) o constraints (incl. boundary conditions) o analysis type (e.g. static linear / non-linear / form-finding etc.)analysis of the results: o explanation of structural behavior, flow of forces (see text above) o serviceability limit state (see text above) o ultimate limit state check (see text above) o output (use these for explaining the structural behavior, flow of forces and both the limit states check):  displacements / deformations  support reactions  internal forces  stressesconclusions including suggested improvements on the basis of the analysis resultsdrawings of important details in principle of the structureconsulted literatureXXL envelope design, required content reportThe building envelope is to a large extend for the architectural expression of the building and seen as acomponent of the climate design concept. It is highly integrated with the structural design.The report by the Building Envelope Design Expert should include:Written report containing the following:- Introduction- Description of façade concept in relation to structural and climatic design of the stadium, structuralconcept of façade, water drainage system, choice of materials 15
    • XXL WORKSHOP 2012 Design and Research Guidelines for Students - Examples of similar facades- Description of production, building sequence and fixing methods- Critical discussion of the result and possible further research needed.DrawingsThe drawings will build up on the architectural elevations and sections. The following drawings are requiredof all major different envelope typologies:- Sections and elevations 1/20- Details 1/10 to 1/5- Explanatory sketches- Sketches of the building sequence- Sketches of function principle if adaptive concepts are chosenThe drawings must include measurements, gridlines, chosen materials and systems, fixing principles andinterface strategies to adjacent building components.XXL design informatics, required content reportThe report by the Design Informatics Expert should illustrate:- The design exploration strategy/strategies that have been set and developed. The specific parameterization strategies of the parametric models, according to the design exploration strategies.- The specific work more deeply developed for his/her own computational topic.- The digital design process he/she organized for the work flow of the interdisciplinary team (strategies for digital modeling, loops between geometry and performance analysis, file exchange, including file formats and plug-ins that have been used, etc.), with emphasis on BIM principles (flow of data and geometry from the single models to the core model and vice versa). The report should include personal and critical reflection on the advantages or challenges of the process.- The archive organization/structure in Dropbox and the archive organization/structure in InfoBase. (Please, do organize InfoBase with the final material of your team, by preparing all the folders and uploading the files). The file naming both in DropBox and InfoBase.- The work for CNC prototyping/manufacturing, not only as technical process, but also by critically reflecting on the advantages or challenges in using them as design tools (and not only presentation tools).One or more appendixes are welcome, illustrating in details the GH models as well as the eventual codes(VB or C#) for scripting or programming.XXL climate design, required content reportThe report by the Climate Design Expert should clearly illustrate:- The development of the design from a holistic perspective on sustainability. It is important to illustrate why certain design choices have been made and how these relate to sustainability in general. The focus can be on CO2-neutrality, energy-neutrality, energy generation, water flows, material use, social sustainability, biodiversity, etc.- A description and graphic presentation of the design decisions that relate to the development of an energy-neutral stadium including the systems used to achieve a comfortable climate. Moreover, the climate design expert should substantiate with simulations to what extent the design task of energy- neutrality has been achieved.- A description and graphic presentation of the design decisions that relate to sustainable energy- generation. Calculations should be used to determine the amount of energy generated in this way.- A description and graphic presentation of the general strategy that leads to a sustainable use of materials; moreover, a brief overview of used materials and how these can be considered sustainable should be given. The material choices should be supported by data from the NIBE catalogue available through the website of TUDelft’s library. 16
    • studio lecture/ # lunch lecture workshop presentation/deadline excursionMSc BT/AE Specified Zaal Specified Zaal Specified Zaal project siteWhen the following titles are present, the consult is manditory for the students responsible of that discipline; the other team members are welcome to join the consult, but not required to.(A) (DI) (SD) (ED) (CD)Group Architect Group Design Informatics Expert Group Structural Designer Group Envelope Designer Group Climate DesignerWeek 3.1: February 7 - February 10 Tuesday 7/2 Wednesday 8/2 Thursday 9/2 Friday 10/2 08:45 - 09:30 1 Opening & Organization Excursion to Kuip Rotterdam Structural Mechanics Sustainable Climate Design * Excursion to De Kuip, Rotterdam 8th February 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Turrin Zaal Q M.Turrin (P.de Ruiter) A. Borgart Zaal Q A. Van Timmeren Zaal U 09.30 Meeting at the Feyenoord stadium 10:45 - 11:30 3 Architectural Design Lectures by: Bas Burgers Envelope Design Design Informatics 09.45 Brief presentation on the existing Stadium; and tour of the Stadium 11:45 - 12:30 4 S.Sariyildiz Zaal Q Frank Werner Bart Wubben T. Klein Zaal Q M. Turrin Zaal U 11.00 Presentation on the new Stadium, process and introduction, by Bas Burgers Project Startup M. Turrin Presentation of the urban context, by Bart Wubben 13:45 - 14:30 5 NURBS parametric design workshop Excursion to the project sites Climate Design Consult (ALL) M. Tenpierik Structural Design Presentation of the concept design of the new Stadium, by Frank Werner 14:45 - 15:30 6 Nourian Zaal Y in Rotterdam Envelope Design Consult (ALL) T. Klein J. Paul Zaal Q 13.30-14.30 Break 15:45 - 16:30 7 Architectural Design Consult (ALL) Structural Design Consult (ALL) 14.30 Visit at the project sites for the New Designs 16:45 - 17:30 8 S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter * Details J.Paul and A. Borgart 17.30 End of the visits - return to DelftWeek 3.2: February 14 - February 17 Tuesday 14/2 Wednesday 15/2 Thursday 16/2 Friday 17/2 **Pin up presentation 17th February - collegezaal F 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) Each group presents 2 conceptual designs. Each discipline is presented in each concept. 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M. Turrin S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter A. Borgart For each concept, each team should make a presentation of about 6 slides. One slide presents 10:45 - 11:30 3 P. Nourian the overall vision of the concept. Five slides are for the five disciplines in the concept. 11:45 - 12:30 4 Y. Chatzikonstantinou Zaal V Each team will use two different screens paralelly: one per concept. 12:30 - 13:45 # An innovative stadium, Franken Vermeulen # Rapid Prototyping, P. De Ruiter 14.00-14.05 Welcome 01 West 060 00 BG West 150 14.05-14.25 Presentation (20 minutes tot: 10 min per concept) Group 1 (5 students) 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop Pin up Presentation and Lectures 14.25-14.45 Discussion (20 minutes) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein M. Turrin Studio One group new design and one group renovation 14.45-15.05 Presentation (20 minutes tot: 10 min per concept) Group 2 (5 students) 15:45 - 16:30 7 P. Nourian Two alternative concepts for each group 15.05-15.25 Discussion (20 minutes) 16:45 - 17:30 8 Y. Chatzikonstantinou Zaal Y ** Details Zaal F 15.30-15.45 Coffee Break 15.45-16.30 Lecture by Marcel de Boer, ARUPWeek 3.3: February 21 - February 24 16.30-17.15 Lecture by Steven Wilbrenninck, BAM - to be confirmed Tuesday 21/2 Wednesday 22/2 Thursday 23/2 Friday 24/2 17.15-17.30 Closing 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Design Informatics Consult (DI) Rhino and Grasshopper workshop 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M.Turrin, P. Nourian, Studio Turrin Chatzikonstantinou Nourian Zaal Y 10:45 - 11:30 3 Y. Chatzikonstantinou Iterative loops in design informatics 11:45 - 12:30 4 Chatzikonstantinou Zaal Y 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Break week - No Education Tuesday 28/2 Wednesday 29/2 Thursday 1/3 Friday 2/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 09:45 - 10:30 2 No Education No Education No Education No Education 10:45 - 11:30 3 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 14:45 - 15:30 6 No Education No Education No Education No Education 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.4: March 6 - March 9 Tuesday 6/3 Wednesday 7/3 Thursday 8/3 Friday 9/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Design Informatics Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M.Turrin, P. Nourian, Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 Y. Chatzikonstantinou 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.5: March 13 - March 16 Tuesday 13/3 Wednesday 14/3 Thursday 15/3 Friday 16/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Design Informatics Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M.Turrin, P. Nourian, Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 Y. Chatzikonstantinou 11:45 - 12:30 4 Middle Term Presentation *** Middle Term presentation 16th March - 01 West 060 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Architectural Design Consult (A) *** Details 00 BG West 150 13.00-15.00 Presentation by the 2 groups (30 minutes each + discussion) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter Studio Structural Design Consult (SD) 15:45 - 16:30 7 J. Paul and A. Borgart 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.6: March 20 - March 23 Tuesday 20/3 Wednesday 21/3 Thursday 22/3 Friday 23/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Design Informatics Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M.Turrin, P. Nourian, Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 Y. Chatzikonstantinou 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.7: March 27 - March 30 Tuesday 27/3 Wednesday 28/3 Thursday 29/3 Friday 30/3 08:45 - 09:30 1 Climate Design Consult (CD) Design Informatics Consult (DI) 09:45 - 10:30 2 M. Tenpierik M.Turrin, P. Nourian, Studio Studio 10:45 - 11:30 3 Y. Chatzikonstantinou 11:45 - 12:30 4 13:45 - 14:30 5 Envelope Design Consult (ED) Architectural Design Consult (A) Structural Design Consult (SD) 14:45 - 15:30 6 T. Klein S.Sariyildiz and P. de Ruiter Studio J. Paul and A. Borgart 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8Week 3.8: Transition Week - April 3 - April 6 Tuesday 3/4 Wednesday 4/4 Thursday 5/4 Friday 6/4 08:45 - 09:30 1 09:45 - 10:30 2 Transition week Transition week Transition week No Education (Easter) 10:45 - 11:30 3 **** Final presentation 5th April - BerlageZaal 1 11:45 - 12:30 4 14.00-14.05 Welcome 14.05-14.35 Presentation (30 minutes) Group 1 (5 students) 13:45 - 14:30 5 Final Presentation 14.35-15.05 Discussion (30 minutes) 14:45 - 15:30 6 Transition week Transition week No Education (Easter) 15.05-15.35 Presentation (30 minutes) Group 2 (5 students) 15:45 - 16:30 7 15.35-16.05 Discussion (30 minutes) 16:45 - 17:30 8 **** Details BerlageZaal 1 16.05-16.15 ClosingWeeks 3.9 - 3.10: Examinations Monday 16/4 Friday 20/4 08:45 - 09:30 1 Deadline final deliverables 09:45 - 10:30 2 (posters, physical models) 10:45 - 11:30 3 MEETING FOR INSTRUCTORS: GRADES 11:45 - 12:30 4 Zaal ** Deadline final deliverables 13:45 - 14:30 5 (final reports) 14:45 - 15:30 6 15:45 - 16:30 7 16:45 - 17:30 8