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Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011
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Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth - ALA 2011

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  • 1. Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth <br />How Librarians Can Partner with Parents and Teachers<br />Michael Zimmer, PhD<br />Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies<br />Co-Director, Center for Information Policy Research<br />University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee<br />www.MichaelZimmer.org<br />
  • 2. Promoting Ethical Literacy<br />Ethical dilemmas facing youth<br />Role of literacy standards &amp; codes<br />Opportunities for new forms of education &amp; intervention<br />Challenges ahead<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 3. Ethical Dilemmas<br />Traditional ethical dilemmas abound for today’s youth<br />“I need a shortcut to complete an assignment”<br />“Defend my awkward classmate, or join the bullying?”<br />“Spreading a rumor, or a secret, about a friend”<br />“Do I steal the CD?” <br />“Sneak a peek at the adult magazine?”<br />What happens when we introduce digitally-networked technologies…<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 4. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />“I need a shortcut to complete an assignment”<br />Use of Sparknotes<br />Essays-for-sale websites<br />Cut-paste from online sources<br />Wikipedia<br />Renewed ethical concerns<br />Plagiarism, responsibility<br />Trust &amp; bias of information sources<br />User-generated content, collaboration<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 5. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />“Defend my awkward classmate, or join the bullying?”<br />Much easier to engage in bullying via instant message, texting, Facebook walls<br />Things can be said via technology that you wouldn’t F2F<br />Doesn’t stop once you leave the playground; doesn’t disappear as time passes<br />Anonymity<br />Renewed ethical concerns<br />Friendship<br />Teasing vs. Harm<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 6. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />“Spreading a rumor, or secret, about a friend”<br />Spread faster, farther with Facebook or MySpace<br />Access to more sensitive information – and images<br />Not always intentional<br />Harder to “take back”<br />Anonymity<br />Renewed ethical concerns<br />Friendship &amp; sharing<br />Gossip<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 7. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />“Do I steal the CD?”<br />Greater opportunities to obtain access to content without paying or authorization<br />P2P downloading of music<br />Copyright-protected content on BitTorrent<br />“Breaking” encryption or DRM to access &amp; share<br />Login/Password sharing<br />Renewed ethical concerns<br />Theft &amp; Ownership<br />Intellectual Property &amp; Fair Use<br />Information Access vs. Control<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 8. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />“Sneak a peek at the adult magazine?”<br />Greater opportunities to view restricted material, or engage in risky behavior online<br />Online pornography<br />Webcam chat, sexting<br />Fear of online predators<br />Renewed ethical concerns<br />Playfulness &amp; exploration vs. taboo<br />Freedom of expression<br />Trust vs. surveillance<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 9. Digital Ethical Dilemmas<br />New twists and turns on traditional ethical concerns<br />Cheating &amp; plagiarism<br />Bias and trust in information sources<br />Property, theft<br />Friendship, teasing, gossip<br />Sharing, privacy, and surveillance<br />Some of these addressed in existing standards &amp; codes, others need different approaches to achieve literacy<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 10. Literacy Standards: ACRL<br />#3: The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system<br />#5: The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally<br />Helps address bias, plagiarism, copyright, netiquette<br />But vague, and is college too late?<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 11. Literacy Standards: AASL 21st<br />#1: Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge<br />Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.<br />Maintain a critical stance by questioning the validity and accuracy of all information.<br />Respect copyright/ intellectual property rights of creators and producers.<br />Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information.<br />Helps address bias, copyright, ethics broadly<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 12. Literacy Standards: AASL 21st<br />#3: Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society.<br />Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.<br />Show social responsibility…<br />Use information and knowledge in the service of democratic values<br />Respect the principles of intellectual freedom<br />Helps support collaboration, responsibility, freedom of expression<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 13. Ethical Codes: ALA<br />II: We uphold the principles of intellectual freedom and resist all efforts to censor library resources<br />III: We protect each library user&apos;s right to privacy and confidentiality with respect to information sought or received and resources consulted, borrowed, acquired or transmitted.<br />IV: We respect intellectual property rights and advocate balance between the interests of information users and rights holders.<br />Helps teach privacy, freedom of expression, property rights<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 14. Where are we?<br />We have literacy standards at multiple educational levels that touch on many of the core ethical concerns<br />Mostly concerned with plagiarism, copyright, bias<br />We have professional codes and statements of rights that touch on additional ethical concerns<br />Address privacy, intellectual freedom, respect<br />But are institutionalized mentions of ethical issues sufficient for reaching youth &amp; attaining literacy?<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 15. New Forms of Literacy Education<br />Talking and listening to youth<br />Discover their unique perspectives on privacy, property, information sharing &amp; exchange<br />Need to shape ethical lessons &amp; examples accordingly<br />Ensure ethics are integrated into all literacy-related educational activities<br />Specifically address ethical questions related to each learning outcome<br />Add ethical components to computer literacy courses, information literacy sessions, special projects<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 16. New Forms of Literacy Education<br />Reach youth through information technology<br />Engage the technology, don’t build fear of it<br />Create ways to teach ethics through the active use of Facebook, Wikipedia<br />Turn all information interactions into “ethical teaching moments”<br />Game nights could include discussion of cheating<br />YouTube video contests could address copyright<br />Searching Google can present lessons on bias, free speech, censorship<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 17. Challenges Ahead<br />Need to ensure parents &amp; librarians obtain necessary ethical training themselves<br />Need to foreground ethics and make it interesting without nagging, preaching<br />Need to trust youth, and give them the tools to make good ethical decisions<br />None of this is easy…<br />Michael Zimmer | ALA Annual 2011<br />
  • 18. Promoting Ethical Literacy in Youth <br />How Librarians Can Partner with Parents and Teachers<br />Michael Zimmer, PhD<br />Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies<br />Co-Director, Center for Information Policy Research<br />University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee<br />www.MichaelZimmer.org<br />

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