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Stages of language development
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Stages of language development

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Stages of language development Stages of language development Presentation Transcript

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  • Pre-Linguistic Stage
    • First year of life the child
    • Development of gestures
    • Making adequate eye contact
    • Cooing, babbling and crying
  • Holophrase Stage
    • One-word stage
    • 10-13 months of age
    • The person speaks one word at a time.
    • He or she learns to direct activities, request, and label.
  • Two-Word Stage
    • 18 months
    • The person learns more words.
    • He or she begins to combine words to make phrases.
  • Telegram Stage
    • Developing Stage
    • Between two and a half and three years old.
    • The person combines words in meaningful order.
  • Near-Adult Grammar Stage
    • Between three and five years of age
    • The person combines words in meaningful order.
  • Full Competence Stage
    • Late childhood.
    • The person understands most grammar rules.
  • LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT CHART
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  • 6 Years In addition to the above consonants these should be mastered: f, v, sh, zh, th,1 He should have concepts of 7 Speech should be completely intelligible and socially useful Should be able to tell one a rather connected story about a picture, seeing relationships Between objects and happenings
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  • Psychological Factors
    • Standard of Care
    • Economic Standing
    • Psychological Disorders
    • Social Fear
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    • Children’s speaking and listening skills lead the way for their reading and writing skills, and together these language skills are the primary tools of the mind for all future learning.
    • - Roskos, Tabors, & Lenhart, 2005, p. v.
    • Proficiency in oral language provides children with a vital tool for thought. Without fluent and structured oral language, children will find it very difficult to think.
    • – Jerome Bruner (1983)
    • Benefits in understanding text by applying letter-sound correspondences to printed material come about only if the target word is in the learner’s oral vocabulary. When the word is not in the learner’s oral vocabulary, it will not be understood when it occurs in print.
    • - National Reading Panel Report (2000), pp. 4-3
  • SEMANTICS
  • General Relationship Function/meaning Agent States that individual performing the action Action Requests action Object Comments on the object of action Recurrence Requests/comments on repetition of activity/object Nonexistence Comments on nonexistence/disappearance of object or person Cessation Comments on cessation of activity Rejection Protests/comments on undesired action or something forbidden Location Comments on spatial location Possession Comments on possession of object Agent action Comments on agent and action Action object Comments on action and object Agent action object Comments on agent, action, and object Action object location Comments on agent, action and location
  • VOCABULARY
    • Tier One Words (Conversational Language)
    • Tier Two Words (Robust Language)
    • Tier Three Words (Content-Specific Language)
  • SYNTAX
  • 12 months old
    • Children begin to use one-word utterances
  • 18 months old
    • Children combine words into two- and three-word utterances
  • 3 years old
    • Children begin to learn complex sentences structure
  • SPEECH
  • INFANTS (BIRTH TO 18 MONTHS)
    • Child communicates needs, wants, feelings, or thoughts through words, gestures, actions, or expressions:
      • Cries to indicate different needs
      • Begins to use words and gestures to communicate (coos, babbles, makes sounds, uses sign language, etc.)
      • Begins to initiate interactions with adults and peers
    • Child communicates for a variety of purposes:
      • Signals for more
      • Greets adults and peers
  • The Infant
    • Communicates nonverbally with adults and other children (reaches for or turns away to end an interaction, waves, smiles, etc.)
    • Communicates verbally with adults and other children (cries, babbles, uses simple words or signs, etc.)
    • Engages in vocal play and back and forth communication games with responsive adults
    • Communicates needs and interests to get responses from others for comfort, warmth, nourishment and satisfaction
  • The Adult
    • Uses alternate ways to communicate when needed (sign language, gestures, etc.)
    • Builds on children‛s interests to introduce new words and ideas during play activities and daily routines
    • Engages children in back and forth communication
    • Creates a climate of trust by responding to infants‛ cues and communications
    • Understands that young infants do not intentionally cry or act out in order to “be naughty” or “make you angry”, but that they are developing ways to communicate their wants and needs.
  • TODDLERS (18 MONTHS TO 3 YEARS)
    • Child communicates needs, wants, feelings, or thoughts through words, gestures, actions, or expressions
    • Uses words, phrases, short sentences and gestures to communicate
    • Child communicates for a variety of purposes
    • Asks questions
    • Initiates social interactions with other children and adults
    • Communicates to show or share with adult
    • Child uses new vocabulary words that they have learned
  • The Toddler
    • Communicates nonverbally through expressions and gestures
    • Communicates verbally ranging from single words to simple sentences
    • Uses words or phrases to express wants, seek attention, protest, comment, or offer greetings
    • Names objects or actions in picture books
    • Asks questions to achieve more information (“What‛s that?” , “Why?” etc.)
  • The Adult
    • Uses alternate ways to communicate when needed (sign language, gestures, etc.)
    • Builds on children‛s interests to introduce new words and ideas during play activities and daily routines
    • Provides opportunities for children to engage in conversation
    • Responds to toddlers‛ cues and communications
    • Engages children in back and forth communication