ECDL/ICDL Module 1 - Concepts of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) - Presentation Slides
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ECDL/ICDL Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Presentation Slides.
This module enables candidates to gain an understanding of the different parts of a computer, as well as some of the key concepts of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), such as those relating to networks and security.
On completion of this module each candidate will:
Understand what hardware is, know about factors that affect computer performance and know about peripheral devices
Understand what software is and give examples of common applications software and operating system software
Understand how information networks are used within computing, and be aware of the different options to connect to the Internet
Understand what Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is and give examples of its practical applications in everyday life
Understand health and safety and environmental issues in relation to using computers
Recognise important security issues associated with using computers
Recognise important legal issues in relation to copyright and data protection associated with using computers

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    ECDL/ICDL Module 1 - Concepts of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) - Presentation Slides ECDL/ICDL Module 1 - Concepts of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) - Presentation Slides Presentation Transcript

    • European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 1 – General Concepts Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Types Of Computer  Mainframe computers  Networked Computers  Personal Computers  Laptop/Notebook Computers Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Personal Digital Assistants/Handheld Computers  Personal digital assistants (PDAs)  Mobile Phones / Smartphones  Multimedia players Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Mainframe Computers  Large, fast and expensive  Used by large organisations such as utility companies, banks or multinational companies  Connect hundreds or thousands of users  Users connect via terminals which are located in different cities or even abroad  Dumb terminals – these types of terminals cannot be used unless they are connected to the mainframe  Intelligent terminals – e.g. a personal computer connected to a mainframe, can also be used when not connected to the mainframe Mainframe London Dublin Paris New York Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Server Networked Computers  Personal computers connected to a server via network cards and cables  The software and data is stored on the central server rather than installed individually on each PC  The network also enables a fast Internet connection, printers and scanners to be shared  Users access allocated resources via a user name and password  Very popular with small-to- medium-sized businesses, schools and colleges/adult education centres Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Personal Computers  An indispensable tool for managers, humble office workers and home users  Two main types:  Desktop model – the system unit sits horizontally on a desk and the monitor is placed on top  Tower model – the system unit is vertical so can be placed on the floor to save desk space  Hardware devices (screen, keyboard and mouse) attached to the system unit (by a cable) are called peripheral devices Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Notebook/Laptop Computers  Similar in specification to a personal computer  Monitor and keyboard are integrated into a single unit  Can be used from the mains or with a built-in rechargeable battery  More expensive than personal computers due to miniaturisation of computer components  Ideal computer for business people and ICT trainers who are constantly on the move Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • PDAs/Handheld Computers  Handheld computers which have superseded electronic organisers  Some use a stylus which you use to write or draw on the screen  Run very basic cut-down software such as calculator, address book and notepad functions  Can be connected to a PC to synchronise data  PDAs can also be used as mobile phones and can access the Web to send and receive emails Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts Mains Parts of a PC  Monitor – display results of processing  System Unit (Computer Case) – contains all basic computer components (CPU, motherboard, microchips, etc) that do all the hard work  Keyboard – enable text and commands to be input into computer  Mouse – enable user to point and click at pictures and menus  Hard Disk Drive (HDD) – inside System Unit , to store programs & data  DVD Drive – read/write CD/DVD  Speakers – play music, listen to voice  Modem – connect to internet
    • Starting Your Computer  Press the power switch on the front of your laptop  Logging by typing: Username: michael Password: xxxxxxxx  After a short period, the Windows desktop will appear  REMEMBER: WORK SAFELY!! Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Hardware and Software  Hardware  Refers to the physical parts of a computer – those parts which you can see or touch  Such as monitor, keyboard, mouse, CD-ROM drive, printer, etc  Software  Primarily a list of instructions coded in a special way that computers can understand o Operating system software – eg Windows which works in the background and controls your software and hardware devices o Applications software – eg Microsoft Word – software used to perform tasks Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • General Concepts  Information & Communication Technology  General term used to describe the use of computers to store, process and transfer information  Can also refer to other office equipment (such as faxes and telephones) which contain tiny computer chips  Information includes business data, voice conversations, still images, motion pictures and multimedia presentations.  ICT is a technology that combines computing with communication links carrying data, sound and video. Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 1 - General Concepts
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 13 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 2 – Hardware
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 14 Computer Essentials  Monitor – to display results of processing  System Unit – this contains all the basic computer components that do all the hard work  Keyboard – to enable text and commands to be input into the computer  Mouse – to enable the user to point and click at pictures and menus
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 15 The System Unit  Can be contained in a tower case or desktop case  Consists of a motherboard which contains complex electronic circuits and silicon chips  All the computer components plug into the motherboard either directly into slots or by cables
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 16 Central Processing Unit  Brain of the computer which is a small silicon chip (Microprocessor). It has two main parts  The control unit – fetches computer instructions from the computer’s memory, decodes them and synchronises the computer’s operations  The arithmetic /logic unit (ALU) where all the work is carried out  Speed is measured in Megahertz or Gigahertz
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 17 Input devices  These are devices used to put data into the computer Keyboard Light pen Mouse Scanner Trackball Joystick Microphone Digital camera
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 18 Output Devices - Monitors  Come in 15”, 17”, 19”, 21” screen sizes  Picture is made up of millions of dots called pixels  Picture quality depends on number of pixels going across and down the screen  Refresh rate is the number of times the picture is drawn on screen  Resolutions  800 x 600 is typical of a 15” screen  1600 x 1200 is typical of larger screens  Two different types  CRT monitors – similar to a TV screen (Obsolete)  LCD/LED monitors – much more slim line
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 19 Output Devices - Printers  Inkjet printers  Mainly used by home users  Monochrome and colour printing  Ink is forced through holes onto the paper  Running cost quite high per page  Laser printers  Standard in most offices  Very high quality b&w printing, very quickly  Suitable for large volume printouts  Running costs quite low due to high capacity cartridges
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 20 Output Devices - Printers  Dot matrix printers  Steel pins hit an inked ribbon  Very noisy and poorer print quality  Used mainly by businesses for printing out multi-part invoices and wage slips etc  Plotter  Used mainly by architects for printing large scale drawings  Several coloured pens are used to draw output on paper or opaque film
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 21 Output Devices  Speakers  Connect to a soundcard supplied with multimedia PCs  Quality of the sound produced can either be controlled on the speakers or from within software
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 22 Input & Output Devices  Touch screen  Allows the user to touch an area of the screen rather than typing from a keyboard  Used mainly in tourist offices, bus information kiosks and Job Centres  Synthesiser  Can be used as an input device to input music to a computer  Can be used as an output device, for example replicating human speech on telephone systems
    • Input / Output Ports  External input and output devices are connected to PC via a port. Common types of ports are:  Serial Port – connect mouse and keyboard  Parallel Port – connect printer  USB Port – connect mouse, scanner, printer, digital camera, flash (thumb) drive  Firewire Port – connect digital video camera  Network Port – connect to cable modem or connect to other computers in the network Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 23
    • Accessibility  Used by People with Disabilities  Voice Recognition Software: convert speech into text on the screen or commands to control programs (Limited Mobility)  Screen Reader: tells user what is on the screen, either speech or Braille output (for the Blind or Visually Impaired)  Screen Magnifier: enlarge display on the screen (Low Vision or Visually Impaired)  On-Screen Keyboard: type data using a pointing device or joystick (Mobility Impaired) Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 2 - Hardware 24
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 25 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 3 – Storage
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 26 How memory is measured  RAM is divided into millions of units called Bytes  Smallest Unit = 1 bit  Each byte contains 8 bits  1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (KB)  1024 KB = 1 megabyte (MB)  1024 MB = 1 gigabyte (GB)  1024 GB = 1 terabyte (TB)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 27 Storage Devices  These are needed to store data on your computer  Most popular devices are:  Floppy disk drive – this stores smaller files (1.44MB)  Hard disk drive – this stores all your programs and data (500GB – 3TB)  CD ROM drive – software and games are normally supplied on CD ROM disks. Information is read-only and cannot be changed (650MB)  CDR/CD-RW drive – large amounts of data can be stored on a CDR or a CD-RW disk (650MB)  DVD ROM drive – these can be used to watch films etc (7GB)  Network drive – online drive for storing and sharing your information securely. (5GB- 2TB)
    • Storage Areas  Click Start Button  Click My Computer  Click C:  Click File Menu  Click Properties Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 28
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 29 Other Storage Devices  Zip Drive (Obsolete)  Uses zip disks which can store either 100Mb or 250Mb of data  Jaz Drive (Obsolete)  Similar to a zip drive but can store up to 1Gb of data  Tape Drive (Obsolete)  Uses data cartridges for backing up data on servers  Very slow access compared to other options  Flash Drive  Plug into a USB port  Typical storage – 4 GB, 16GB, 32GB and 64GB ($5 - $60)  Network Drive  Online File Storage  Share Your Information (Photos, Music, Video & Any Digital Content) Securely with Friends  (5GB – 2 TB)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 30 Removable Storage Comparison Device Capacity Price of Media Floppy disk 1.44Mb NA (Obsolete) Zip 250Mb NA (Obsolete) USB Thumb drives* 4GB – 64GB $5 - $60 CDRW 650MB $1.20 DVDRW 7Gb $1.50 Hard drives* 500GB – 3TB $92 - $225 Network drives (Online storage) 5GB - 2TB FREE - $20/month
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 31 Types of Memory  There are two kinds of Computer Memory  RAM (Random Access Memory)  This is the computer’s working memory  The more you have installed, the faster your computer will work  ROM (Read Only Memory)  Used to start your computer and load Windows  ROM can only be accessed by the CPU and cannot be changed
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 32 What is RAM?  Used to store information on a temporary basis (eg: software, text document etc)  CPU transfers information from the hard disk drive to RAM  Information can then be processed  Information stored in RAM is temporary  When the computer is switched off, anything stored in RAM is lost  This type of memory is called volatile memory
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 33 An Example of RAM  Switch on the computer  The processor transfers operating system software from the hard disk drive to RAM  The Windows desktop appears  Double-click on the Word icon  The processor transfers the software from the hard disk drive to RAM  Open a Word document  The processor transfers the file information into RAM so you can see it and make changes to it  If you don’t SAVE the document, the changes will be lost when you switch off the computer!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 34 What is ROM?  Used to store important information that the CPU needs to keep the PC running  Information stored in ROM  can only be accessed by the CPU and can’t be changed  is permanent and is retained after the computer is switched off  can be used repeatedly  This type of memory is called non-volatile
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 35 An Example of ROM  Switch on your computer  A Power On Self Test (POST) and boot-up are carried out to make sure your CPU, memory chips and other vital components are working  If they are, then information is transferred to RAM to start up your operating software  If not, then an error message will appear on screen  The PC start-up software is stored in ROM so it can be used time and time again.
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 36 File Sizes  A simple Word document will measure approx 20KB  A 12 page report with pictures will take up much more space – maybe 300KB  A 100 page user manual with photos and screenshots could be at least 2MB in size  Microsoft Excel, for example, takes up approx. 6Mb of hard disk space 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 Text document 12 page report 100 page manual Microsoft Excel
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 37 Standard PC Memory  As computers have improved so has the amount of memory – look at the following minimum requirements:  Windows XP requires 128MB RAM  Windows Vista requires  512MB RAM  Windows 7 requires 1 GB RAM  Windows 8 requires 2 GB RAM  If you wanted to run additional software, you would need to double the above figures!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 3 - Storage 38 Computer Performance  Two main factors will determine how quickly your computer works  The speed of the processor measured in Megahertz(MHz) or Gigahertz(GHz)  The amount of RAM installed measured in Megabytes(MB)  Each time you launch software, the program is transferred to RAM  If you have several programs running at once, this will slow down your computer!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 39 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 4 – Software
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 40 What is software?  Primarily a list of instructions coded in a special way that computers can understand  Operating system software – eg Windows which works in the background and controls your software and hardware devices  Applications software – eg Microsoft Word – software used to perform tasks
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 41 Operating System Software  A series of programs that organise and control a computer  Provides an interface so that the user can communicate with the computer  Communicates between software and hardware devices  Organises the storage and retrieval of information  Manages the smooth running of programs running in RAM by allocating the required resources
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 42 Popular Operating Systems  Microsoft Windows is the most widely-used operating system (OS)  OS2 is an OS created by IBM  Macintosh (MacOS) was created by Apple  Linux is a popular alternative open-source OS  MS-DOS was precursor of Windows but text-based  Unix is another OS used in companies or universities
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 43 What Happen When You Switch On Your Computer ?  A Power On Self Test (POST) and boot-up are carried out to make sure your CPU, memory chips and other vital components are working  If they are, then information is transferred to RAM to start up your operating software  If not, then an error message will appear on screen  BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) is stored in ROM  The PC start-up software is stored in ROM so it can be used time and time again.
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 44 Software Updates  Software is constantly updated to give the user improved features  Most software manufacturers will provide updates to solve problem issues  Software manufacturers will provide new versions to comply with new operating systems  Be careful with software versions – a file created in Word 2007 may not be opened on a PC running Word 97 or Word 2003
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 45 Graphical User Interface  GUI Enables users to click and point at icons and menus on screen, instead of typing in computer commands
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 46 Applications Software  Word processor – used for typing letters, memos, reports etc  Spreadsheet – used for performing calculations (eg Accounts) and for creating Charts  Database – used for storing large quantities of data which can be interrogated to display specified pieces of information  Desktop Publishing – used for creating newsletters, booklets, posters, cards etc  Presentation – used for creating presentations which can either be displayed on screen, or printed onto overhead projection film or 35 mm slides.  Web browsers – allows users to view and download information from the world wide web
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 47 Examples of Application Software  Microsoft Office – which comprises:  Word (Word Processing)  Excel (Spreadsheet)  Access (Database)  PowerPoint (Presentation)  Publisher (Desktop Publishing)  Outlook (E-mail Management)  FrontPage (Web Page Creation)  Internet Explorer / Netscape Navigator / Mozilla / Opera (Web Browsers)  CorelDraw / Photoshop (Photo Editing)  Final Fantasy (Games)  AutoCAD (3D Design)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 48 Problem Solving  Problems due to operator error or problem with hardware or software  Errors, beeps of tones, frozen display, missing cursor  Problem alerted with screen message, prompt or instructions. Example to “End Now” the application
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 49 Problem Solving  Launch Windows Task Manager by Pressing:  Select the Application “Not Responding”, then Press “End Task” button to Stop Application
    • Problem Solving  Peripherals Devices like Printers, Scanners no response (Check cable, connection, power switch on)  Call IT support staff, or online support team to report the error messages encountered Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 50
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 51 Managing the System  Click Start button  Click Control Panel
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 52 Managing the System  Double Click System icon. Click Hardware tab
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 53 Managing the System  Click Device Manager
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 54 Managing the System  Click Human Interface Devices
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 4 - Software 55 Managing the System  Windows Task Manager shows software currently running  Right click on any blank part of the Taskbar  Click Start Task Manager
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 56 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 5 – Information Networks
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 57 Local Area Network  Computers which are linked by cabling in the same room or building  A server controls the network and stores data which is used by other users on the network (clients)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 58 Networks  Advantages  Printers, scanners etc can be shared  Work is stored on the server and can be accessed from any of the client computers  Users can communicate and exchange data  Software is loaded once onto the server rather than on individual computers  Disadvantages  Security measures are needed to stop users accessing programs and data  Can be complicated to set up and requires support from skilled technicians  Faults affecting the server will affect the client computers
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 59 Wide Area Networks  A WAN connects computers in different geographical areas  These are connected via the telephone system  Used by multinational companies to communicate between different countries  The world’s largest WAN is the Internet!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 60 Client/Server Networks  Core data stored in central Server computer  Data access by Client PC  Allow users to interface with Server  Downloading or Uploading Files from the internet is example of Client/Server relationship
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 61 The Telephone Network in Computing  A modem is required for a computer to communicate over telephone lines  Data is converted from digital to analogue and then back again  The speed at which data is transmitted and/or received is measured in bits per second  The dial-up modem speed is 56 Kilobits per second (Obsolete)  Cable Modem speed range from
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 62 Public Switched Telephone Network  PSTN for short!  The international telephone system used for making day- to-day telephone calls  It is the main reason why computers have become so popular in recent years!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 63 Integrated Services Digital Network  ISDN for short  Has a greater range of frequencies than PSTN  At least as twice as fast as PSTN  Typical transfer rate of 128 Kilobits per second  Data & Voice is transmitted simultaneously  Special connection and modem required
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 64 Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line  ADSL uses telephone lines to transmit data at very fast speeds (512 Kilobits per second)  ADSL modem and splitters required to separate telephone signal from the ADSL signal. You can still make telephone calls when surfing web!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 65 Wireless LAN  The Computers / Laptops in our classroom is connected by WLAN  Click Start button  Click My Network Places to view
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 66 Satellite Network  Satellite Network is used in Aeroplanes, Ships in vast ocean, or mountaineers climbing the mountains when normal 2G,3G,4G Smartphones cannot work
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 67 The Internet  Huge network of computers connected together  You need a computer, modem, an account with an Internet Service Provider (ISP)  ISP provides access to the Internet through their servers  Many ISPs offer flat-rate access at fixed cost (e.g. SingTel, M1, Starhub)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 68 World Wide Web  Huge sets of interlinked documents accessible via internet.  Accessing huge information and documents via internet
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 69 Search Engines  Help you to find information from internet  Examples: Google, Yahoo, Altavista, Lycos, MSN, etc
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 70 Intranets and Extranets  Intranet is similar to the Internet but is internal to an organisation  Users access the Intranet through a user name and password  Enables users to share information and communicate via electronic messaging  An Extranet can be accessed from outside the Intranet by authorised users via a user name and password
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 5 - Information Networks 71 E-mail  By far the most popular use of the Internet  E-mail messages arrive almost instantaneously, anywhere in the world  The same message can be sent to more than one person at the same time  It is very easy to reply to and forward e-mail messages  Documents or photos can be sent as attachments  E-mail software is required or you can access webmail providers online (e.g. Hotmail, Yahoo, Gmail etc)
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 72 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 6 – Use of IT in Everyday Life
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 73 Computers or People?  Computers can  calculate millions of times faster than humans  never get tired  can do jobs which are dangerous for humans  store large amounts of information in one place  find information quickly  never lose or misplace information
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 74 People versus Computers  Computers cannot  write a book  comfort a person in distress  think for themselves  think of new ideas
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 75 Computers in business  Business Administration  Payroll  Keeping customer records  Processing sales orders  Keeping accounts  Stock management  Airline Booking Systems  Bookings instantly recorded to avoid double booking  Availability of flights instantly accessible  Online Banking  Access your account 24/7  No need to travel to a branch  Reduction in overheads for the bank  Insurance Claims Processing  Maintain databases to prevent duplicate claims/fraud  Send automatic renewal notices to customers
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 76 E-Commerce  Growth of the Internet in the last few years has been phenomenal  Virtually any organisation has their own web site  Virtually anything can be bought or sold over the Internet  The Internet is available 365 days a year – it never closes!  Eg: Buy/Sell at www.eBay.com or Book Flights at www.TigerAirways.com
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 77 E-Banking  Most Banks allow you to access your banking account via the internet . You can access your bank account 24/7  You can check your balance, transfer money, make payments, apply/cancel GIRO, print statements, etc at www.DBS.com.sg  Everything you can do accept withdrawal CASH
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 78 E-Government  Most Governments information is online, including Singapore Government  CPF, HDB, ICA, IRAS, MOH, MOM, LTA, SLA, URA, WDA, WSH, etc
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 79 Computers in Education  Student Registration  Keep student records  Enable computerised timetabling  Swipe-cards to monitor student attendance  Computer-Based Training  Wide range of software packages to aid learning  Can teach a wide range of subjects  Multimedia Learning Platform  E-learning  Student resources made available over the Internet  Assignments can be submitted via email  Multimedia Learning Platform  Distance Learning  Flexible & Cost Effective Training
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 80 e-Learning / Distance Learning  Advantages  Learn at own pace  Learning at times convenient to individual  No travelling involved  Much more control over learning process  Disadvantages  Distractions around the home  Needs for extra self discipline  Lack of human interaction  Potential feelings of isolation Students choose to learn at home rather than at college
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 81 Teleworking  Advantages  Flexible schedules  Reduces commuting (Less travelling time)  Avoid traffic jams  Work in the comfort of your own home  Reduced office space requirements  Enables greater focus on specific task  Disadvantages  Distractions around home  Need extra self discipline  Lack of human interaction  Lack of teamwork in shared projects  Feelings of isolation Many people choose to work at home rather than commuting to the office
    • The Electronic World  Information Superhighway  Any kind of information, anywhere in the world available to anyone with internet connected computer  Information Society  Access to unlimited amounts of information without leaving home or work  Access information with looking at books  People employed to collect, process, store, retrieve and transfer information Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 82
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 83 E-Commerce  Company:  advertise products and services on internet  can allow customers to return unsatisfactory goods  Customers:  view on-line catalogue  make choice of goods or services  complete online order form, providing personal details: name, address, telephone number, email address, etc  Specify payment method: credit / debit card, PayPal, etc  Store Available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year – it never closes!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 84 Purchasing Over The Internet  You have to enter your name, address and credit/debit card details to purchase goods/services  Most sites will offer a secure site which will scramble your details so it can’t be intercepted by thieves  Secure sites will start with the prefix https:// - look out for the padlock symbol at the bottom of your screen  You have the same consumer rights as buying from a shop
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 85 Purchasing Over The Internet  Advantages  You can shop 24 hours a day, 7 days a week  You can shop from the comfort of your own home  You can surf the web to find the best bargains  Many dealers will offer discounted prices for shopping online  Disadvantages  You cannot see or try goods before purchasing  You may have to pay extra for delivery  You cannot speak to a person for sales advice  There is some degree of risk giving out your debit/credit card details over the Internet
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 86 Alternative Payment Methods  NOCHEX (www.nochex.co.uk) lets you send and receive money from anyone with an email address and a debit card  Paypal (www.paypal.com) offers a similar service
    • Instant Messaging (IM)  Must have computer & internet connection  Instant real time text communication globally  Program known as instant messenger is used for text or chat communication.  Alerts you when somebody on your list is online.  Allows you to send files such as documents and pictures.  Nowadays, programs such as Windows MSN (Messenger) and Skype are used as instant messengers and VoIP. Some users make use of web cam during IM or VoIP communications. Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 87
    • Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP)  Communicate in real time using voice with another person/s.  It is a telephone conversation over Internet. Sometimes this is referred to as Internet telephony or IP telephony.  Using your computer, internet connection, a VoIP program, a microphone and speakers/headphones.  There are no additional charges for these voice calls because these happen over the same Internet service used for Web browsing and e-mail.  Eg: Skype, Google Talk Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 88
    • Web log (Blog)  Website posted in chronological order  Online diary / journal website  Readers can leave comments on Blog  I have created a Blog for students taking ICDL Test:  ICDL-TEST.Blogspot.com Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 89
    • Podcast  Audio & Video are broadcast over the internet  Constantly updated content  Uses RSS feed to subscribe to updated content Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 90
    • RSS Feeds  RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication  A way of publishing frequently updated content such as news headlines, football scores, stock prices, weather information, etc Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 91
    • Virtual Communities  Virtual or Online Communities  Social Networking Sites: MySpace, Facebook, Bebo, Twitter, etc  Allow you to share information like photos and videos with your friends online  Allow you to write Blogs and sent messages to your friends  Fantastic way of making new friends and have fun  Be aware not every member in communities are genuine.  Keep personal information like your phone no, your address Private Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 6 - Use of IT In Everyday Life 92
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 7 - Health and Safety Environment 93 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 7 – Health and Safety Environment
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 7 - Health and Safety Environment 94 Ergonomics  Lighting – rooms should be well lit and windows should have blinds to avoid sunlight  Ventilation – windows should open to allow free circulation of fresh air  Monitors – should be positioned away from sunlight and windows  Furniture – use an adjustable chair with good back support set to the correct height for comfortable use of keyboard and mouse  Accessories – use copyholders and footrests where necessary Ergonomics refers to design and functionality which includes the following factors
    • Ergonomics Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 7 - Health and Safety Environment 95
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 7 - Health and Safety Environment 96 Health Issues  Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI)  Collective name for a range of disorders affecting neck, limbs and back  Results in numbness and tingling in limbs  Eyestrain  Caused by long periods in front of a computer screen  Caused also by poor lighting  Back problems  Caused by poor seating and posture  Caused by prolonged use of a computer  Safety Precautions  Cables should be safely secured  Keep work surfaces tidy  Take frequent short breaks  Wear your glasses!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 7 - Health and Safety Environment 97 The Environment  Recycle printer cartridges  Recycle printer paper  Use Print Preview facility to check your work before printing  Do you REALLY need a printout? Print for a purpose!  Use power schemes to reduce amount of electricity (Screen Saver)  CD-ROMs, electronic documents all reduce the need for printed materials
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 98 European Computer Driving Licence Module 1 – Concepts of IT Section 8 – Security
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 99 Backing Up Data  You should always back up your data on a regular basis  Keep a second copy of important files on a Thumb Drive or DVD and store it separately from your PC. (Store off-site)  Your data is much more valuable than your computer equipment - it’s priceless  You can protect your PC equipment with insurance, but this will not replace your data!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 100 Data Security  Confidential information must be kept securely  Only authorised personnel should have access to confidential information  Password should be changed regularly  Password should not be revealed  User ID and password to login into system  Different access rights for different persons in organisation by login with different User IDs  Lock your computer to furniture. Thieves don’t need password to get your data. They might just steal your PC
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 101 Computer Viruses  Viruses are small programs which are designed to cause damage to a computer or whole networks by spreading and replicating itself  Examples of Virus: Time bomb, Macro viruses, Worm, Trojan Horse, etc  Your PC can catch a virus by sharing files on disks/CDs, viewing/downloading files on the web and from e-mail attachments  The only protection against this is having anti-virus software installed on your machine
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 102 Protection against viruses  Scan files for viruses before opening them  Make sure you keep your antivirus software up to date – Thousands of viruses are made daily – it only takes one to wreak havoc on your computer  If on broadband, install a firewall to prevent unauthorised people or hackers from gaining access to your personal data in your computer
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 103 Copyright  Computer software is copyright material  Covered by Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988  You don’t “buy” the software  You pay for a licence to install and use the software on one machine – see the End User Licence Agreement (EULA)  You are breaking the law if you make a copy of software and give/sell it to someone else
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 104 Personal Privacy  Right to privacy is a fundamental human right  The advance in computerised technology makes it easier to store and share information  See what can go wrong with some case studies!
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 105 The Data Protection Act 1998  Came into force in March 2000  Sets rules for the processing of personal information  Applies to paper records as well as computerised records  Intended to protect the privacy of individuals  Full details can be found at: www.dataprotection.gov.uk  For Singapore Data Protection Act 2012, click: http://app.mica.gov.sg/Default.aspx ?tabid=487
    • Module 1 - Concepts of ICT - Section 8 - Security 106 Data Protection Principles  There are 8 enforceable principles – data must be:  Fairly and lawfully processed  Obtained for specific purposes only  Adequate, relevant and not excessive  Accurate and up-to-date  Kept no longer than necessary  Processed in accordance with the data subject’s rights  Cannot be transferred to other countries without similar protection  Kept safe and secure from outsiders