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Indigeneity (QUT)

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Lecture in KKP002: Imagining the Creative Future - one of a series of 'thought world' or 'paradigm' lectures designed to problematise a contemporary 'creative industries' practice.

Lecture in KKP002: Imagining the Creative Future - one of a series of 'thought world' or 'paradigm' lectures designed to problematise a contemporary 'creative industries' practice.

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  • 1. BEING, KNOWING, DOING: INDIGENEITY
  • 2. 86 88 93 89 02 04 www.mwk16.com98
  • 3. http://v2.stelarc.org/
  • 4. I see this age as the final period of human beings...You could hollow out the body, make it a better host for the new technology. Stelarc http://www.heise.de/tp/english/inhalt/co/2026/3.html
  • 5. 1
  • 6. ARILLA IP INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS/CLUSTERS • Creative Industries – Visual Arts, Crafts • Education/Training • Indigenous Cultural Industries • Regional Development • Retail • Tourism INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY • Traditional Knowledge • Copyright • Patents • Industry Knowhow • Networks and Untraded Intangible Assets
  • 7. ARILLA IP INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS/CLUSTERS • Creative Industries – Visual Arts, Crafts • Education/Training • Indigenous Cultural Industries • Regional Development • Retail • Tourism INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY • Traditional Knowledge • Copyright • Patents • Industry Knowhow • Networks and Untraded Intangible Assets „Economic Rights‟ Social- Technical Capital Healing Self Reliance Safety Cultural Maintenance No More Whitefeller Welfare
  • 8. 2
  • 9. While modern art got its first impetus through discovering the forms of primitive art, we feel that its true significance lies not merely in formal arrangement, but in the spiritual meaning underlying all archaic works.... That these demonic and brutal images fascinate us today is not because they are exotic, nor do they make us nostalgic for a past which seems enchanting because of its remoteness. On the contrary, it is the immediacy of their images that draws us irresistibly to the fancies and superstitions the fables of savages and the strange beliefs that were so vividly articulated by primitive man." Mark Rothko - 13.10.43 ‘The Portrait Of The Modern Artist’WNYC - Radio interview with Adolph Gottlieb.
  • 10. “While modern art got its first impetus through discovering the forms of primitive art, we feel that its true significance lies not merely in formal arrangement, but in the spiritual meaning underlying all archaic works.... That these demonic and brutal images fascinate us today is not because they are exotic, nor do they make us nostalgic for a past which seems enchanting because of its remoteness. On the contrary, it is the immediacy of their images that draws us irresistibly to the fancies and superstitions the fables of savages and the strange beliefs that were so vividly articulated by primitive man.”
  • 11. 'Who's that bugger who paints like me?' Rover Thomas at the Venice Biennale, 1990
  • 12. Mark Rothko b. 1903, Dvinsk, Russia; d. 1970, New York City Mark Rothko was born Marcus Rothkowitz on September 25, 1903, in Dvinsk, Russia. In 1913, he left Russia and settled with the rest of his family in Portland, Oregon. Rothko attended Yale University, New Haven, on a scholarship from 1921 to 1923. That year, he left Yale without receiving a degree and moved to New York. In 1925, he studied under Max Weber at the Art Students League. He participated in his first group exhibition at the Opportunity Galleries, New York, in 1928. During the early 1930s, Rothko became a close friend of Milton Avery and Adolph Gottlieb. His first solo show took place at the Portland Art Museum in 1933. Rothko’s first solo exhibition in New York was held at the Contemporary Arts Gallery in 1933. In 1935, he was a founding member of the Ten, a group of artists sympathetic to abstraction and Expressionism [more]. He executed easel paintings for the WPA Federal Art Project from 1936 to 1937. By 1936, Rothko knew Barnett Newman. In the early 1940s, he worked closely with Gottlieb, developing a painting style with mythological content, simple flat shapes, and imagery inspired by primitive art. By mid-decade, his work incorporated Surrealist techniques and images. Peggy Guggenheim gave Rothko a solo show at Art of This Century in New York in 1945. In 1947 and 1949, Rothko taught at the California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco, where Clyfford Still was a fellow instructor. With William Baziotes, David Hare, and Robert Motherwell, Rothko founded the short- lived Subjects of the Artist school in New York in 1948. The late 1940s and early 1950s saw the emergence of Rothko’s mature style, in which frontal, luminous rectangles seem to hover on the canvas surface. In 1958, the artist began his first commission, monumental paintings for the Four Seasons Restaurant in New York. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gave Rothko an important solo exhibition in 1961. He completed murals for Harvard University in 1962 and in 1964 accepted a mural commission for an interdenominational chapel in Houston. Rothko took his own life February 25, 1970, in his New York studio. A year later, the Rothko Chapel in.Houston was dedicated Rover Thomas Joolama c. 1926 – 98 Rover Thomas was born in about 1926 at Gunawaggi, Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route in the Great Sandy Desert of Western Australia. A Kukatja/Wangkajunga speaker, Rover's first father, Lanikan Thomas was Wangkajunga, as was his second father, Sundown: his mother Ngakuyipa (Nita) was Kukatja. From an East Kimberley perspective, Rover Thomas belonged to the Joolama subsection or skin group. Rover Thomas lived in the bush with his family until his mother died when he was about 10 years old. Then he moved to Billiluna Station where he was initiated into traditional law by a man from Sturt Creek and eventually worked as a jackaroo. As a young man, he worked with a European fencing contractor in Wyndham and later the Northern Territory. After two years, he returned to Western Australia and worked as a stockman on Bow River Station where he married for the first time. Later on, he worked on Texas Downs Station for nine years, before moving to Old Lissadell Station and Mabel Downs Station, and back to Texas Downs where he met his second wife, Rita. Then he worked in Noonkanbah community, before moving to Warmun where he worked as a carpenter's assistant, building new houses in the community. Shortly after moving to Warmun early in 1975, Rover Thomas found or was given the open ceremony of the Gurirr Gurirr (Kril Kril) which eventually provided a stimulus for the production of art in the East Kimberley. To complement specific verses of the Gurirr Gurirr song cycle, first performed in Warmun in the late 1970s, pieces of plywood were painted with ochre and carried on the shoulders of participants. Rover Thomas and his classificatory uncle Paddy Jaminji painted many of these works on board which were seen by various people including Mary Macha, the Manager of Aboriginal Traditional Arts, Perth who began to market their work in about 1983 –84. A few years later Rover began to paint for Waringarri Aboriginal Arts, Kununurra. Rover Thomas was awarded the John McCaughey Prize for the best painting Blancher country, displayed in 1990 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. The following year he represented Australia at the Venice Biennale, with Trevor Nickolls. The artist was the subject of the important solo exhibition Roads Cross: The Paintings of Rover Thomas, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra in 1994.
  • 13. Mark Rothko b. 1903, Dvinsk, Russia; d. 1970, New York City Mark Rothko was born Marcus Rothkowitz on September 25, 1903, in Dvinsk, Russia. In 1913, he left Russia and settled with the rest of his family in Portland, Oregon. Rothko attended Yale University, New Haven, on a scholarship from 1921 to 1923. That year, he left Yale without receiving a degree and moved to New York. In 1925, he studied under Max Weber at the Art Students League. He participated in his first group exhibition at the Opportunity Galleries, New York, in 1928. During the early 1930s, Rothko became a close friend of Milton Avery and Adolph Gottlieb. His first solo show took place at the Portland Art Museum in 1933. Rothko’s first solo exhibition in New York was held at the Contemporary Arts Gallery in 1933. In 1935, he was a founding member of the Ten, a group of artists sympathetic to abstraction and Expressionism [more]. He executed easel paintings for the WPA Federal Art Project from 1936 to 1937. By 1936, Rothko knew Barnett Newman. In the early 1940s, he worked closely with Gottlieb, developing a painting style with mythological content, simple flat shapes, and imagery inspired by primitive art. By mid-decade, his work incorporated Surrealist techniques and images. Peggy Guggenheim gave Rothko a solo show at Art of This Century in New York in 1945. In 1947 and 1949, Rothko taught at the California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco, where Clyfford Still was a fellow instructor. With William Baziotes, David Hare, and Robert Motherwell, Rothko founded the short-lived Subjects of the Artist school in New York in 1948. The late 1940s and early 1950s saw the emergence of Rothko’s mature style, in which frontal, luminous rectangles seem to hover on the canvas surface. In 1958, the artist began his first commission, monumental paintings for the Four Seasons Restaurant in New York. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gave Rothko an important solo exhibition in 1961. He completed murals for Harvard University in 1962 and in 1964 accepted a mural commission for an interdenominational chapel in Houston. Rothko took his own lifeFebruary 25, 1970, in his New York studio. A year later, the Rothko Chapel in.Houston was dedicated Rover Thomas Joolama c. 1926 – 98 Rover Thomas was born in about 1926 at Gunawaggi, Well 33 on the Canning Stock Route in the Great Sandy Desert of Western Australia. A Kukatja/Wangkajunga speaker, Rover's first father, Lanikan Thomas was Wangkajunga, as was his second father, Sundown: his mother Ngakuyipa (Nita) was Kukatja. From an East Kimberley perspective, Rover Thomas belonged to the Joolama subsection or skin group.Rover Thomas lived in the bush with his family until his mother died when he was about 10 years old. Then he moved to Billiluna Station where he was initiated into traditional law by a man from Sturt Creek and eventually worked as a jackaroo. As a young man, he worked with a European fencing contractor in Wyndham and later the Northern Territory. After two years, he returned to Western Australia and worked as a stockman on Bow River Station where he married for the first time. Later on, he worked on Texas Downs Station for nine years, before moving to Old Lissadell Station and Mabel Downs Station, and back to Texas Downs where he met his second wife, Rita. Then he worked in Noonkanbah community, before moving to Warmun where he worked as a carpenter's assistant, building new houses in the community. Shortly after moving to Warmun early in 1975, Rover Thomas found or was given the open ceremony of the Gurirr Gurirr (Kril Kril) which eventually provided a stimulus for the production of art in the East Kimberley. To complement specific verses of the Gurirr Gurirr song cycle, first performed in Warmun in the late 1970s, pieces of plywood were painted with ochre and carried on the shoulders of participants. Rover Thomas and his classificatory uncle Paddy Jaminji painted many of these works on board which were seen by various people including Mary Macha, the Manager of Aboriginal Traditional Arts, Perth who began to market their work in about 1983 –84. A few years later Rover began to paint for Waringarri Aboriginal Arts, Kununurra. Rover Thomas was awarded the John McCaughey Prize for the best painting Blancher country, displayed in 1990 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. The following year he represented Australia at the Venice Biennale, with Trevor Nickolls. The artist was the subject of the important solo exhibition Roads Cross: The Paintings of Rover Thomas, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra in 1994.
  • 14. 3
  • 15. "I'm not racist. Some of my best friends are white."
  • 16. 4
  • 17. U N I L I N E A L I S M Prehistoric Preliterate Primitive Historical Literate Civilized
  • 18. U N I L I N E A L I S M Prehistoric Preliterate Primitive Historical Literate Civilized
  • 19. ' ... a complex, utterly precise connection between person, knowledge and place ... (which is) at the heart of Australian desert ontologies.' Eric Michaels, Bad Aboriginal Art (p. 171)
  • 20. From The Moon Bone Cycle
  • 21. 'Intellectual Property' Individual Collective Authorship Agency Originality/novelty Insight/Revelation Ownership Custodianship Monetary exchange Social reciprocity Economics Economics/politics/cosmol ogy/epistemology/ ontology/social cohesion
  • 22. The Japanangka Paradigm Ways of Knowing ... It is more than just information or facts and is taught and learned in certain contexts, in certain ways and is purposeful only to the extent to which it is used ... Our Ways of Knowing are embedded in our worldview and are an equal part of this system, not (an) artefact of this. They are socially refined and affirmed, giving definition and meaning to our world. Without ‘knowing’ we are unable to ‘be’, hence, our Ways of Knowing inform our Ways of Being. Ways of Being We are part of the world as much as it is part of us, existing within a network of relations that are reciprocal and occur in certain contexts. This determines and defines for us rights to be earned and bestowed as we carry out rites to country, self and others – our Ways of Being ... Our Ways of Being evolve as contexts change. For instance relations change amongst people at particular times such as movement from one life stage to another, or with a birth or death of a member. Where once our Ways of Being were exercised within our country and group, since colonisation we engage with other Aboriginal people and groups more frequently and immediately set about establishing identities, interests and connections ... Through this, our Ways of Being shape our Ways of Doing. (cf. ‘kindredness', 'relationality', 'connectedness') Ways of Doing Our Ways of Doing are seen in our languages, art, imagery, traditions and ceremonies etc. and are a synthesis and an articulation of our Ways of Knowing and Ways of Being. Karen Martin – Booran Mirraboopa
  • 23. The Third Place Social- cultural animation Yarning and singing up: social poetics and shifting stories Tacit & embodied knowledge Phronesis IP Being/knowing/doing Conviviality Curriculum on the fly Capability
  • 24. REFERENCES Flyvbjerg, Bent (2001), Making Social Science Matter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Harries-Jones, Peter, Where Bonds Become Binds: the Necessity for Bateson's Interactive Perspective in Biosemiotics http://www.semioticon.com/frontline/harries_jones.htm Langton, M. (1993) Well I saw it on the television and I heard it on the radio. North Sydney: The Commission Martin, Karen – Booran Mirraboopa (2001), Ways of Knowing, Ways of Being and Ways of Doing: Developing a theoretical framework and methods for Indigenous re-search and Indigenist research. Symposium B Session 1, The Power of Knowledge, the Resonance of Tradition – Indigenous Studies: Conference 2001, The Australian National University, Canberra, 18 – 20 September 2001 Moreton-Robinson, Aileen (2000), Talkin’ Up to the White Women. Brisbane: University of Qld Press Katz, Arlene M, and Shotter, John (1999), Social Poetics as a Relational Practice: Creating resourceful communities, Paper prepared for the Workshop: Construction of Health and Illness, at Social Construction and Relational Practices Conference, University of New Hampshire, Sept 16th- 19th, 1999 http://pubpages.unh.edu/~jds/js.ak.SOCPOENTS.htm West, E. (2000), The Japanangka teaching and research paradigm: an Aboriginal pedagogical framework. Paper to Indigenous Research and Postgraduate Forum, Aboriginal Research Institute, University of South Australia, Sep. 2000 Wilson, Shawn (2001), What is indigenous research methodology? Canadian Journal of Native Education, Vol. 25, Issue 2, 175-17