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Co-operation for digital preservation and curation: collaboration for collection development in institutional repository networks
 

Co-operation for digital preservation and curation: collaboration for collection development in institutional repository networks

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Slides from a presentation given at the DigCCurr2007 International Symposium in Digital Curation, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, 18-20 April 2007

Slides from a presentation given at the DigCCurr2007 International Symposium in Digital Curation, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, 18-20 April 2007

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    Co-operation for digital preservation and curation: collaboration for collection development in institutional repository networks Co-operation for digital preservation and curation: collaboration for collection development in institutional repository networks Presentation Transcript

    • Co-operation for digital preservation and curation: collaboration for collection development in institutional repository networks Michael Day , Maureen Pennock and Julie Allinson UKOLN, University of Bath Bath BA2 7AY m.day@ukoln.ac.uk/ http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/
    • Presentation outline
        • Emerging work from the Digital Curation Centre
        • Contexts
          • Collaborative infrastructures for digital preservation
          • Networks of institutional repositories
        • Collaboration on preservation infrastructures
        • Collaboration on collection development policies
          • Potential areas for collaboration
        • Conclusions
          • What do digital curators do?
          • What do they need to know?
    • Contexts (1)
      • Collaborative infrastructures needed for digital preservation and curation, e.g.:
          • Preservation is "an ongoing, long-term commitment, often shared, and cooperatively met, by many stakeholders" (Lavoie & Dempsey, 2004)
      • Examples:
        • Shared services (e.g. file format registries, bit-level preservation)
        • Networks of "trust" (audit and certification, etc.)
        • Collaboration on policy level, e.g. on collection development and unified access
    • Contexts (2)
      • Institutional repositories:
        • Used by higher education and research organisations to provide (open) access to peer-reviewed publications and other research materials
        • Increasingly supported by deposit "mandates" from universities or research funding bodies
        • Setting up a repository implies an institutional commitment to long-term stewardship
    • Contexts (3)
      • Collaborative infrastructures for institutional repositories:
        • Distributed services linked (for access) by metadata harvesting
          • OAI-PMH
          • Data Providers vs. Service Providers (aggregators)
        • Potential for the development of shared services to support repositories
          • Alma Swan & Chris Awre, Linking UK Repositories (JISC, 2006): http://www.jisc.ac.uk/
    • Contexts (4)
      • Potential shared services (from Swan & Awre):
        • Advisory services (e.g. on IPR, preservation)
        • Content creation, digitisation
        • Repository building or hosting
        • Metadata enhancement
        • Resource discovery
        • Name authorities
        • Citation analysis and research assessment
        • Preservation
    • Digital preservation (1)
      • Shared services for preservation:
        • Not all institutions with repositories will be expected to manage long-term preservation challenges:
          • Lack of local expertise and resources
          • Existing availability of third party services in related areas, e.g. data archives, national libraries
          • Preservation is a logical area for collaboration
    • Digital preservation (2)
      • Examples:
        • DARE (Digital Academic Repositories) initiative - The Netherlands
          • National Library (KB) has responsibility for all content deposited in participating repositories
        • Repository Bridge project - UK
          • Demonstration of harvesting e-theses (using OAI-PHM and METS) by the National Library of Wales
    • Digital preservation (3)
      • Examples (continued):
        • SHERPA DP project - UK
          • Developed disaggregated framework for outsourcing preservation, based on the OAIS model
          • Explored the packaging and transfer of content (using METS)
    • Digital preservation (4)
      • Examples (continued):
        • Preserv project - UK
          • Led by University of Southampton
          • Simple model of modular services, e.g. for:
            • Bit-level preservation
            • Object characterisation and validation (e.g. using registries like PRONOM-DROID)
            • Preservation Planning (risk assessments, technology watch, etc.)
            • Preservation strategies (e.g. migration)
    • Digital preservation (5) Preserv service provider model (Hichcock, et al ., 2007)
    • Collection development (1)
      • Collection development:
        • Set of activities, including: selection, acquisition, deselection, disposal, preservation
        • A traditional focus of library collaboration, e.g. on the development of shared collections
        • Need for institutional repositories to consider own collection development requirements with wider (national or international) contexts
    • Collection development (2)
      • Managed collaboration on collection development
        • Potentially reduces unnecessary duplication of effort, but ...
        • But may also support redundancy:
          • Replication of content
          • Application of different preservation strategies
        • Need to investigate role of repositories with regard to more formally published research materials
          • Perhaps e-journals should be the main focus of preservation activities in this domain?
    • Collection development (3)
      • Institutional repositories need to define collection development policies with regard to:
        • Institutional requirements
        • Interoperability requirements (e.g. OAI-PMH)
        • Preservation requirements
    • Collection development (4)
      • Collection development issues:
        • Content types
          • Peer-reviewed research outputs, scientific datasets, administrative records, ...
          • Will be different preservation priorities
        • Object types (file formats)
          • Policies will have direct influence on risks (and costs) of long-term preservation, e.g.:
            • Accepting any format
            • Only accepting a limited number of format types (e.g. PDF/A, XML); need for conversion and validation tools, or considerable post-processing
    • Collection development (5)
      • Potential areas for collaboration (continued):
        • Ingest workflows
          • Checking conformance with submission rules
          • Automated tools for format characterisation and validation, maybe conversion (normalisation)
          • Metadata enhancement, e.g. consistent forms of name
        • Ongoing review (and weeding) of collections
          • Withdrawal of content (contentious issue)
          • Superseded or duplicate material
        • Defining preservation service levels
          • Different policies needed for different types of material
    • Conclusions (1)
      • What should curators do?
        • Collaborate with other stakeholders on:
          • Strategic level collaboration (e.g. through organisations like the UK Digital Preservation Coalition)
          • Policy development (e.g. through emerging national frameworks)
          • Research and development
          • Standards development (e.g., OAIS, ISO Records Management Metadata)
          • The development of shared services (e.g. GDFR)
    • Conclusions (2)
      • What do curators need to know?
        • Where core services are dependent on other organisations (or services):
          • Need to understand the risks
          • Need to deal with these sensibly (e.g., through contracts, service-level agreements, or by moving the most vital functions in-house)
        • Many remaining open questions:
          • Be aware that there are still many unknown unknowns
          • But it is still important to do something (and to collaborate)