Sled Training 101[1].Ppt2

  • 2,055 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Sports , Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,055
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Sled Training 101
  • 2. What is a sled used for?
    • General Physical Preparedness Work
    • Injury Rehabilitation
    • Strength Training
    • Prehabilitation
    • Hypertrophy
    • Starting Strength
    • Acceleration Strength
    • Strength Endurance
    • Active Restoration
  • 3. Why use a sled?
    • It is easy, relatively cheap, and doesn’t require a lot of equipment or a gym
    • Most of the general population has no preconceived ideas sled training. Therefore you may be able to achieve a higher work capacity with someone who might not otherwise put forth as much effort due to their concern about injury, etc.
    • Another way of easing into a strength program without all the soreness
    • Pretty much idiot proof
    • Most of the fundamental pulling exercises will not aggravate those clients suffering from knee and back issues
    • Low chance of injury
  • 4.
    • EFS Mini Sled $145.00
  • 5. Different types of sleds
    • Dragging Sled $185.40
  • 6.
    • Prowler: Econo Prowler $269.00
  • 7.
    • Prowler 2: The Prowler $369.00
  • 8.
    • EFS Custom Prowler 2 $439.00
  • 9.
    • Homemade
    • All you need:
    • Tire
    • Rope
    • Weight Belt
    • Plywood or concrete
    • Weight
  • 10. Drills
    • · Forward drag with strap around belt or shoulder harness
    • · Bear crawls with strap around belt or shoulder harness
    • · Backward drag with strap around belt
    • · Side (lateral movement) drag with strap around belt
    • · Side drag while crossing feet over with strap around belt
    • · Forward walking with the rope in pull through position (sumo walks)
    • · Forward walking with arms extended in front (walk with high knees for extra variety)
    • · Rope dragging behind knees
    • · Ankle dragging
    • · Backward drag with split rope, shoulders retracted slightly if weight is light enough
    • · Forward drag with split rope, hands behind back
    • · Forward drag or backward drag reverse Fly variations (using light weight / empty sled) – I, Y & T pulls
    • · Seated arm over arm drag
  • 11. Exercises with the split rope
    • · Pull throughs
    • · Standing Chest press (done with elbows in and neutral grip)
    • · Standing Chest press (done with elbows out and palms facing down)
    • · One arm chest presses (alternate left and right one rep at a time)
    • · Front raises
    • · High pulls
    • · Rows to chest
    • · 1 arm rows
    • · Reverse Fly variations (using light weight / empty sled) – I, Y & T
    • · Bicep curls
    • · Forward lean triceps extension
    • · Lateral raises
    • · Internal or external rotation
    • · Standing pulldown abs (done exactly as you would if using a cable or band apparatus)
  • 12. Exercises with the Belt
    • · Walking lunges with strap around belt
  • 13. Drills with Prowler
    • Vertical push
    • Horizontal push
    • Bucket push
    • Vertical push
    • And pretty much all the drills and exercises listed before
  • 14. Sled training for acceleration
    • Bridge the gap between form running drills and weight room exercises
    • Sled training promotes hip hyperextension (in running speed all force production is from hip hyperextension)
    • Training ground force production
    • Rapid acceleration determines success in sports not top speed
    • 10% of bodyweight/10% decrease in speed? (instead look at running mechanics)
    • Take into account the running surface (coefficient of friction)
    • Keep the distances to 10-20 meters (use long rest periods for maximum recovery)
  • 15. Study
    • J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2005 Sep;45(3):284-90.
    • The effects of resisted sled-pulling sprint training on acceleration and maximum speed performance.
    • Zafeiridis A , Saraslanidis P , Manou V , Ioakimidis P , Dipla K , Kellis S .
    • AIM: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of resisted (RS) and un-resisted (US) sprint training programs on acceleration and maximum speed performance. METHODS: Twenty-two male students (age 20.1+/-1.9 y, height 1.78+/-7 cm, and weight 73+/-2 kg) completed RS (n=11) or US (n=11) sprint training programs. The RS group followed a sprint-training program with 5 kg sled pulling and the US group followed a similar sprint-training program without sled pulling. The training program consisted of 4x20 m and 4x50 m maximal runs, and was applied 3 times/week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training programs the subjects performed a 50 m run and the running velocity of 0(-1)0 m, 10(-2)0 m, 20-40 m and 40-50 m was measured. In addition, stride length and stride frequency were evaluated at the 3(rd) stride in acceleration phase and between 42-47 m in maximum speed phase. RESULTS: The RS improved running velocity in the run sections 0(-1)0 m and 0(-2)0 m, while in US group the running velocity in all run sections in acceleration phase remained unchanged (p>0.05). In contrast, RS training had no effect on running velocity in maximum speed phase, whereas US improved running velocity in 20-40 m, 40-50 m, and 20-50 m run sections (p<0.05). Stride rate increased only after RS in acceleration phase (+7.1+/-2.9%; p<0.05), whereas stride length increased only after US in maximum speed phase (+5.5+/-2.5%; p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Sprint training with 5 kg sled pulling for 8 weeks improves acceleration performance (0(-2)0), while un-resisted sprint training improves performance in maximum speed phase (20-40) in non-elite athletes. It appears that each phase of sprint run demands a specific training approach.
  • 16. Sled training for strength
    • Dragging for strength — The best type of loading for strength is to drag increasingly heavier weights for a shorter distance. The best distance for this is 100 feet. A sample strength workout would look like this:
    • Around the waist dragging: Begin with 45 pounds and drag for 100 feet. Rest 30 to 45 seconds and return. Rest another 45 seconds and add another 45-pound plate. Keep with this same distance and continue rest and loading pattern until your body tells you to stop. When it comes to strength dragging, one movement per workout is plenty.
    • Source:
    • Drag Your Butt Into Shape General Physical Preparedness: Westside Style Dave Tate
  • 17. Empirical rule of 60%
    • Dragging using the empirical rule of 60%: The empirical rule of 60% is one of the best ways to induce active restoration in the course of a micro cycle.
    • Example:
    • Day 1 : Front raise dragging: 100 pounds for two trips of 100 feet.
    • Day 2 : Front raise dragging: 60 pounds for two trips of 100 feet. You'll notice the weight is 60% of the weight used on day one.
    • Day 3 : Front raise dragging: 36 pounds for two trips of 100 feet. This time you'll notice the weight is 60% of the weight used on day two.
    • Source:
    • Drag Your Butt Into Shape General Physical Preparedness: Westside Style Dave Tate
  • 18. Sled training for restoration
    • Dragging for restoration — The basic guideline for restoration dragging is to keep the load light and drag for a greater distance. The best distance for this type of loading is 200 feet.
    • Example:
    • 1) Around the waist dragging: 90 pounds for 200 feet, rest 30 seconds and return. This movement would be performed for four trips. (One trip equals 200 feet.)
    • 2) Front Raises: Two trips, 200 feet with 35 pounds
    • 3) Rear Raises: Two trips, 200 feet with 35 pounds
    • 4) Ankle dragging: Two trips, 200 feet with 35 pounds
    • Source:
    • Drag Your Butt Into Shape General Physical Preparedness: Westside Style Dave Tate