Social Networking, Web2.0 and Teaching and Learning

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Accompanied an online discussion on how to reflect changes wrought by web2.0 in the teaching of adults in the Australian VET sector

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Social Networking, Web2.0 and Teaching and Learning

  1. 1. http://flickr.com/photos/7447470@N06/1345266896/ Teaching and Learning with SOCIAL NETWORKING and WEB 2.0
  2. 2. Where are you?
  3. 3. “ The Read/Write Web” (Tim Berners Lee) Original photo by Hummanna .
  4. 4. eLearning 2.0/Web 2.0 (Stephen Downes) <ul><li>Elearning 1.0: </li></ul><ul><li>static packaged content </li></ul><ul><li>little true interactivity and learner input and </li></ul><ul><li>very little contact with a teacher </li></ul><ul><li>represented by Learner Management Systems. (eg WebCT, Blackboard, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Elearning 2.0: </li></ul><ul><li>more student-centred </li></ul><ul><li>centred around a Personal Learning Environment using social software. </li></ul><ul><li>students generate and share content. </li></ul><ul><li>they interact not only with teachers and their peers, but with anyone in the world they can learn from . </li></ul>(this description courtesy of Sean Fitzgerald)
  5. 5. PERSONAL PUBLISHING/ PARTICIPATORY MEDIA TOOLS <ul><li>Blogs – writing (mostly) </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts (audio) </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis – collaboration (mostly text) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Networking sites (MySpace, Facebook, Ning, Bebo, Twitter, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>MEDIA </li></ul><ul><li>Video repositories: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YouTube, TeacherTube, Google Video, BlipTV </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flickr (photo sharing) </li></ul><ul><li>UStreamTV (video creation) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Quick Poll <ul><li>How many of you have a </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have a blog? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook , MySpace, or Ning site? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delicious (social bookmarking) or Flickr (photosharing) account? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use Twitter (microblogging)? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. PARTICIPATORY MEDIA/CULTURE SOCIAL MEDIA SOCIAL NETWORKING SOCIAL SOFTWARE YouTube Flickr MySpace Facebook Ning, etc
  8. 8. Education by and large has not changed. Syllabus/curriculum is still rooted in a past paradigm of fixed knowledge. The world beyond classrooms has changed a great deal, and will continue to do so at an ever-increasing rate…… Photo courtesy of Sawrah, http://flickr.com/photos/sawrah/314474272/
  9. 9. WHAT HAS CHANGED? <ul><li>(See Mike Wesch’s The Machine is Us/ing Us at </li></ul><ul><li>http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=6gmP4nk0EOE ) </li></ul><ul><li>Decline of the Gatekeepers </li></ul><ul><li>Publish then evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>Content Creators; Content Rankers </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has access to everything </li></ul><ul><li>The World is Flat (Thomas Friedman) </li></ul><ul><li>“ People just don’t subscribe to magazines anymore; they also subscribe to people.” </li></ul>
  10. 10. Courtesy of Greg Whitby
  11. 11. Paradigm Shift #1
  12. 12. Paradigm Shift #2? COMMUNITY-CENTRIC
  13. 13. 10 Aspects of Paradigm Shift <ul><li>Pedagogy - didactic- > constructivist </li></ul><ul><li>Networking - isolated -> connectivist, distributed </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing - copyright -> creative commons </li></ul><ul><li>Literacy – print -> multiliteracies </li></ul><ul><li>Heuristics client/server -> peer to peer </li></ul><ul><li>Formality – > informal learning </li></ul><ul><li>Transfer – lecture, sit/get -> modeled, demonstrated </li></ul><ul><li>Directionality – push -> pull e.g. RSS </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership – proprietary -> open source </li></ul><ul><li>Classification – taxonomy -> folksonomy </li></ul>Vance Stevens for AACE Feb 21, 2009
  14. 14. Networked Learning
  15. 15. CONNECTIVISM: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age (George Siemens, University of Manitoba, Canada) <ul><li>Principles of Connectivism: </li></ul><ul><li>Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning . </li></ul><ul><li>Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Creative Commons Licensing from Jeffrey Beall at http://www.flickr.com/photos/denverjeffrey/301014978/
  17. 17. Blogs as a Teaching/ Learning Tool http://www.flickr.com/photos/millzero/1523858246 / Resource : Blogs in Education http://blogsineducation.wikispaces.com/
  18. 18. Podcasting Resource : Podcasting for Educators http://podcastingforeducators.wikispaces.com/
  19. 19. Wikis as a Teaching/ Learning Tool Resource : Wikis in Education http://whywikisineducation.wikispaces.com/
  20. 20. Social Bookmarking as a Teaching/Learning Tool
  21. 21. Photosharing as a Teaching/ Learning Tool Resource : Teaching with Flickr http://teachingwithflickr.wikispaces.com/
  22. 22. Twitter as a Teaching/ Learning Tool
  23. 23. yammer.com
  24. 24. Social Networking Sites as Teaching/Learning Tools (eg Facebook)
  25. 25. Horizontal Learning (multitasking) Instant Messaging Assignment SMS iPod Surfing Watching video/TV
  26. 26. HORIZONTAL V VERTICAL LEARNING
  27. 27. Vertical Learning (single focus) Assignment: What were the principal factors that led to the Indonesian coup in 1965 and the eventual downfall of President Sukarno? (5000 words)
  28. 28. Horizontal v Vertical Learning <ul><li>The discerning eteacher: </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledges the nature and influence of horizontal learning (multitasking) </li></ul><ul><li>Knows when to encourage vertical learning (single focus activity) </li></ul>
  29. 29. How and where do teachers and students acquire the skills to operate effectively in this type of networked world?
  30. 30. Awareness: <ul><li>More about ‘learning to be’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>part of a participatory culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a networked learner/educator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>part of a community </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. How do I work? <ul><li>I know from my own life that something has changed. I am now a much more social learner. I like to draw on the knowledge of others who I can contact and with whom I can discuss issues... I have definitely changed the way I learn, and have found a more enjoyable way of learning. Technology, and the connections it affords, has made that possible. </li></ul><ul><li>I doubt that I could study a formal ‘course’ anymore…. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Acquiring the Skills <ul><li>Join an online community or email list </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions and initiate discussions about your interests and needs </li></ul><ul><li>Start publishing or tracking blogs, podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Do an online course in multiliteracy </li></ul><ul><li>Create social bookmarking and photosharing accounts </li></ul><ul><li>Create media – start simple: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Upload photos to Flickr; comment on others’ photos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>create Digital Stories (Photostory, Moviemaker) and upload to YouTube </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Search YouTube and other video repositories for educational content and start using it in your teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Place yourself in the new habitus of learning – you need to do it to understand and internalise the power of networks; reading and observing will not achieve this philosophical seachange </li></ul><ul><li>Put yourself to the side; know that the best teachers are always willing learners </li></ul>
  33. 33. The excellent eteacher: <ul><li>has an online presence/website (eg course homepage on LMS, or own website, blog, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Knows how to use technology for delivery and assessment and therefore has a blog, a wiki, or podcast site </li></ul><ul><li>Includes media in delivery and production of teaching materials and student assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Models and teaches digital literacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creates and provides digital resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaches search, validation, and verification skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employs and models RSS as a means of aggregating and distributing content </li></ul></ul>
  34. 34. The excellent eteacher: <ul><li>Teaches about, and employs collaborative approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Switches between sage and guide as appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Knows when to call in the wisdom of the experts to balance the wisdom of the crowd </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledges the value of informal learning </li></ul><ul><li>Accepts that engaging learners is necessary (and that probably means using technology) </li></ul>
  35. 35. The excellent eteacher: <ul><li>Acknowledges that students may assess the value of a resource via their networks rather than accept the word of the expert (teacher/lecturer) </li></ul><ul><li>Uses social bookmarking for collective mining and sharing of resources </li></ul><ul><li>Is a good (and frequent) online communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Knows how to effectively combine synchronous and asynchronous modes of delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Is able to teach in a virtual classroom/web conferencing environment (eg Centra, Elluminate, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Must be e-connected and draw on the resources of their networks to remain current (and demonstrate to students) </li></ul>
  36. 36. New Learning? No - different conditions and environments <ul><li>a new habitus of learning (Learning 2.0?) </li></ul><ul><li>Despite Prensky’s mantra that Gen Y brains are wired differently, the physiology of learning has not changed </li></ul><ul><li>But learning no longer confined to the classroom or working with immediate peers </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher no longer the sole source of content </li></ul><ul><li>We now have a “decentralisation of resource provision” </li></ul><ul><li>the blurring of social and academic spheres of activity </li></ul>
  37. 37. Agency is on the learner to turn information into knowledge <ul><li>The new model supplies ‘stuff’; not knowledge, which an individual assembles according to their own interests </li></ul><ul><li>Text WAS knowledge pushed; NOW text is a resource that learner must make sense of > self-knowledge </li></ul>
  38. 38. Resources <ul><li>TAFE SA eLearning Website (still under development/almost ready) http://elearning.tafesa.edu.au/ </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs in Education http://blogsineducation.wikispaces.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasting for Educators http://podcastingforeducators.wikispaces.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching with Flickr http://teachingwithflickr.wikispaces.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis in Education http://whywikisineducation.wikispaces.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Your Guide to Social eLearning - http://socialelearning.flexiblelearning.net.au/social_elearning/index.htm </li></ul>
  39. 39. IN CONCLUSION: <ul><li>Being a connected educator involves : </li></ul><ul><li>engaging with the world of participatory media </li></ul><ul><li>guiding students in this new disintermediated world </li></ul><ul><li>modelling the use of technology for lifelong learning </li></ul><ul><li>allowing time for ‘slow learning’ and reflection </li></ul><ul><li>It’s all about connections …… </li></ul>
  40. 40. yammer.com AND DON’T FORGET:

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