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What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
What is Matariki?
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What is Matariki?

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384919-what-is-matariki/ …

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384919-what-is-matariki/

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Matariki is the Maori name for the Pleiades constellation which appears above the horizon in early June signifying the start of the Maori New Year. Traditionally this is the time when new crops are planted - and the beginning of a new cycle of growth.

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  • Thank you Nikos. I don't receive nothing more from slideshare, but you? Thanks for yours always kind comments! Have a fun life!
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  • Very nice presentation!!! Thanks for sharing and congratulations dear Michaela !! Wish you a beautiful evening! Best greetings from Greece. I wish you also a wonderful weekend. Nikos
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  • merci Mireille pour votre agréable commentaire
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  • Une conférence artistique et richement documentée, merci !
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  • Celebrate Maori New Year with the Matariki Festival at Te PaPa, 9 June – 26 June 2011 Tuesday, 31 May 2011 Matariki Festival at Te Papa 2011 In early June the star cluster Matariki (the Pleiades or the Seven Sisters) will reappear in our dawn skies. The Maori New Year begins with the first new moon after Matariki’s reappearance and, from 9 June, Te Papa is bringing this special celebratory period to all people of Aotearoa New Zealand with an 18-day Matariki Festival. The theme for this year is ‘Nga Kakahu o Ranginui – The Cloaks of Ranginui’. According to legend, the cloaks of Ranginui (Sky Father) came from his son Tane, who wanted to make sure his father, was appropriately dressed in a beautiful cloak.
  • Tane decided to endow his father with stars in the many colours of the rainbow, so he searched the heavenly bodies of light. Once he obtained the stars, he threw them up to adorn Ranginui, along with the moon and the sun. Now, when we look up into the night sky, we are reminded of Tane’s journey and are inspired by the beauty of Ranginui’s cloak. In the Matariki Festival programme, the annual Matariki Gala at Te Papa has become a highlight of Wellington's social calendar, bringing together the city's cultural, artistic, and corporate communities to celebrate the Maori New Year. This year, a special effort will be made to raise funds for Canterbury. A percentage of table sales will be donated to the Red Cross Canterbury Earthquake Relief Fund, and an auction will be held during the evening, in which all proceeds will be donated to the fund.
  • This year sees the return of the crowd pleasing Seven Sisters and Seven Bothers concerts. On the Saturday 11 June, enjoy a day of entertainment with this year’s seven sisters; Kahu Taumata, Nat Rose Te Hei with special guest sister Kim Halliday, Majic and Robbie, Aja Wairere Ropata, Rachel Fraser, Kirsten Te Rito and Mihirangi.
  • On Saturday 18 June, join MC Adrian Wagner and this year’s star studded line-up of seven talented brothers; Anatonio Maioha, Troy Hunter, Wiremu Hohaia, Billy TK Senior, Te Paamu, Coast, and Maitreya ft The Babysitters Circus. The Festival has something for everyone including a range of contemporary and traditional dance, fashion from New Zealand’s top Maori and Pacific designers, a special Whanau day which includes fun activities for children and seven taonga from our collection of cloaks will be on display on the Marae. These cloaks express the importance of weaving in the Maori creation story, the strength of an art form that continues through generations, and the outstanding skill and knowledge of the weavers. These ancestral cloaks carry with them the values of kaitiakitanga (protection and guardianship), manaakitanga (care), and aroha ki te tangata (respect and regard for others) – values at the heart of Matariki itself.
  • Traditionally, Matariki was a time when Maori prepared for the upcoming events of the year. We continue to acknowledge the importance of Matariki in the past, and its importance to us for the future. It is a time to reflect, and a time to spend with family and friends – a time to appreciate the people around us. Come and enjoy the Maori New Year at Te Papa! Te Papa thanks the following companies and organisations for their generous support of the Matariki Festival at Te Papa: Principal sponsor NZ Post, Festival partners TelstraClear, The Southern Trust, Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Maori, Te Puni Kökiri, and Wellington City Council and, Matariki Education Fund sponsor, Crown Forestry Rental Trust. Matariki Festival at Te Papa Thursday 9 June – Sunday 26 June 2011.
  • Transcript

    • 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384919-what-is-matariki/
    • 2. Matariki is the Maori name for the Pleiades constellation which appears above thehorizon in early June signifying the start of the Maori New Year. Traditionally this isthe time when new crops are planted - and the beginning of a new cycle of growth.
    • 3. Matariki is the Maori name for the group of stars also known as the Pleiades star cluster or The SevenSisters. The Maori new year is marked by the rise of Matariki and the sighting of the next new moon. Thepre-dawn rise of Matariki can be seen in the last few days of May every year and the new year is markedat the sighting of the next new moon which occurs during June.
    • 4. Matariki has two meanings,both referring to a tinyconstellation of stars; MataRiki (Tiny Eyes) and MataAriki (Eyes of God).
    • 5. Traditionally, dependingon the visibility of Matariki,the coming seasons cropwas thought to bedetermined. The brighterthe stars indicated thewarmer the season wouldbe and thus a moreproductive crop. It wasalso seen as an importanttime for family to gatherand reflect on the past andthe future.
    • 6. Today Matariki meanscelebrating the uniqueplace in which Maori livesand giving respect to theland they live on.
    • 7. Matariki iscelebrated witheducation,remembrance andthe planting of newtrees and cropssignalling newbeginnings.Hongi ...traditional Maori form of greeting
    • 8. Matariki was the optimumtime for new harvests, andceremonial offerings to theland-based gods Rongo,Uenuku and Whiro toensure good crops for thecoming year.
    • 9. It was also seen as aperfect time to learn aboutthe land we live on and toremember whakapapa(ancestry) who havepassed from this world tothe next and the legacythey left behind.
    • 10. Rangi - Sky-father - embracing Papa-Tua- Nuku - Earth-mother. Rangi is on the bottom front, shown by a large koru design, topped by a double spiral niho-kuri - a dog tooth notch is used, and Papa-Tua-Nuku is depicted being pulled away to enable Tane’s brothers and sisters to leave the womb. The row of piko, or new ferns, represent her children and descendants. Papa has a single spiral attached with niho-taniwha - dragon tooth notching.NATURE’S ORDERSperm whale bone carving byChristopher "Kiri" Matatahi
    • 11. All Iwi (Maori Tribes)celebrate Matariki, althoughthey may celebrate atdifferent times. For sometribes celebrations are heldwhen Matariki is first seenin the dawn sky, for othersit is celebrated after the fullmoon rises, and for othersthe dawn of the next newmoon.
    • 12. The sky was used byMaori for manyreasons throughouthistory. Reading fromthe vast volumes ofstars was a way ofpreserving history,knowledge, culture andmaintaining ancientpractices. The time ofMatariki was acelebration in allcustoms and beliefs,so arts in its manyforms were veryimportant to thisperiod.
    • 13. The appearance of the star cluster known as Matariki is a time to celebrate New Zealandsunique history and place in the world. New Zealand Post marks the start of the Māori New Yearwith its Matariki 2011 - Hei Matau stamp issue.New Zealand Post is also a principal sponsor of the Auckland and Wellington Matariki festivals
    • 14. In 2010 New Zealand Post proudlymarked the occasion with a uniquestamp collection focused on manutukutuku (traditional Maori kites).Authentic emblems of Maori culturalpractice, these kites are also rich incultural significance and an integralpart of Maori folklore and rituals.‘Manu tukutuku’ – or Maori kites –are the theme of the third annualNew Zealand Post Matariki stampseries, marking the dawn of the newMaori year.
    • 15. 50c – Manu AuteMaori made many of theirkites in the shape of birds(manu). The 50 cent stampshows the manu aute, a kitein the shape of a bird thattraditionally represents themanifestation of a person’ssoul or spirit. The manuaute on the stamp is one ofthe largest birdlike kites andis thought to be the oldest ofall surviving specimens.It is held at the AucklandWar Memorial Museum -Tamaki Paenga Hira.
    • 16. $1.80 – Manu TaratahiThe manu taratahi on the$1.80 stamp is one of onlyfour known specimens thathave survived to the presentday.Manu taratahi were namedafter the single plumeprojecting from the upper endof the kite (taratahi meansend point). The kite featuredon this stamp is also part ofthe Auckland War MemorialMuseum’s collection.
    • 17. The contemporary weaver, Veranoa Hetet, was specially commissioned by New Zealand Post tocreate two of the kites featured in the stamp release – the manu pātiki on the $1.00 stamp andthe ūpoko tangata on the $2.30 stamp.The ūpoko tangata, traditionally named after the plant they were made from, were smaller thanother kites and it is believed they were made for younger kite flyers.The manu pātiki takes the form familiar to manymodern kite makers – two rods crossed at right angles.The finished shape was likened to a flounder (pātiki).
    • 18. Traditionally manu tukutuku were produced andflown at the time of Matariki.
    • 19. The detailed carvings on the outside of the Te Whare Runanga Marae, from the Tekoteko - the carving of a man-like figure on top of the Marae, to the tukutuku and kowhaiwhai patterns inside, work together to tell the history and genealogy of their iwi (tribe).Te Whare Runanga: The Maori Meeting House
    • 20. Carvings pay respect to the past andevery carved piece tells a story.Traditional carvers versed in the oraltraditions of the tribe, help to keepMāori culture alive by creating theseintricate works, which can be read bythose who know how. The shape of theheads, position of the body, as well asthe surface patterns work together torecord and remember events.
    • 21. 2009New Zealand Post stamps commemorating Matariki"Matariki is an appropriate time to honour Māori cultureas a key influence on, and an integral part of, NewZealands sense of nationhood“.The six-stamp series honours the heitiki as an icon ofMāori Art, and features three contemporary and threehistoric heitiki.
    • 22. Raponis contemporary heitiki, carved from pounamu(greenstone), is on the $1.00 stamp.A self-taught carver, Raponi has carved more than1,000 heitiki since the late 1960s. He specialises inMāori weapons and personal adornments made fromNew Zealand pounamu and paraoa (whalebone),concentrating mainly on the various forms of heitiki.The use of paraoa signifies a particularly high regardfor the taonga being created. The $1.50 stamp shows the contemporary carving by Rangi Kipa. Proficient in various disciplines, Rangi specializes in ta moko, sculpture, and ethnographic taonga and has works in major collections in New Zealand and overseas. Rangi was awarded the 2006 Creative New Zealand Craft/Object Art Fellowship and the Molly Morpeth Canaday Creative Excellence Award in 2004.
    • 23. Rangi Hetets paraoa carvingappears on the $2.30 stamp. Thecontemporary carving links thisyears series to the inauguralseries in 2008 when it featured onthe $2.00 stamp.
    • 24. Heitiki from the past are honoured on the other three stampsAn early pounamu heitiki, which was a feature of the acclaimed Te Maori exhibition that touredthe United States in 1984, is on the 50 cent stamp. The permanent home for this taonga is theAuckland War Memorial Museum, and itwas selected for the issue to recognisethe 25th anniversary of Te Maori The heitiki depicted on the $2.00 stamp is held in Te Papa. Milky green in colour, it shows the variety and beauty of the pounamu, the main material used in carving special and important heitiki.
    • 25. The $1.80 stamp features the unprovenanced heitiki, also held in TePapas collections. While its origin isunknown, this heitiki was selected byTe Papas curatorial team as anexcellent example of the art
    • 26. The Māori language provides this country with a unique language identity from the rest of the world.Māori is becoming more widely spoken. In 1987 the Māori language was named as the officiallanguage of New Zealand, along with English. Ko Te Reo Te Hā Te Mauri O Te Māoritanga - Language is the very life-breath of beingMāori.
    • 27. The Tino Rangitaratanga flag, the Maori flag.
    • 28. Rakau whakapapaGenealogical staves,mnemonic aid to thereciter of longgenealogies.
    • 29. Text & pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Hine e Hine (Maiden, O Maiden) - Hayley Westenra

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