Vlaho Bucovac http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1261267-vlaho-bukovac1/
Vlaho Bukovac (Biagio Faggioni)
Vlaho Bukovac (Italian: Biagio Faggioni) Born 5 July 1855 Cavtat, Austria-Hungary (today's Croatia)  Died 23 April 1922 (a...
Bukovac was born in Cavtat, a small fishing on the Adriatic coast, in what is now Croatia. As a teenager he travelled the ...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vlaho Bukovac (1855 - 1922) One of Croatia's Finest Artists
 
Sound :   Operatica  (Lord Vanger)  – Mon amour Text and pictures: Internet Arangement:  Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.n...
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Vlaho Bukovac1

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The greatest painter that Dubrovnik (and arguably Croatia) has ever produced is unquestionably Vlaho Bukovac, the Cavtat innkeeper’s son who went on to become artistic hot property in Paris, London and Prague.
YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE: http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1261267-vlaho-bukovac1/
(You have a link on the first slide)

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  • Thank you Cachi, Renn and Johndemi, I am very glad if you enjoyed. Thanks
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  • Beautiful portraits ,thank you for introducing me to this very talented artist.... Love the song also......
    Thank you Michaela.
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  • Nice portraits. Nice paintings. A very different rendition of a very famous melody. Thanks.....
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  • Lovely portraits, my favorites are slide 13, 41 and 44. Thank you Michaela. Job well done.
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  • YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
    http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1261267-vlaho-bukovac1/
    (You have a link on the first slide)
    THANK YOU!
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  • The greatest painter that Dubrovnik (and arguably Croatia) has ever produced is unquestionably Vlaho Bukovac, the Cavtat inkeeper’s son who went on to become artistic hot property in Paris, London and Prague. Known both for his perceptive portraits and his grandiose history paintings, Bukovac was also subtly innovative, blending the kind of acutely-observed realism popular in the late nineteenthcentury with expressive techniques picked up from the French Impressionists and their followers. Like many of his countrymen, the young Bukovac had a strong desire to escape the limited career opportunities of the Dalmatian coast and seek his fortune elsewhere. His uncle Frano had already emigrated to America, and asked young Vlaho to join him in New York in 1867. It’s at this point that Bukovac’s biography begins to resemble something out of a Charles Dickens novel.
  • His uncle soon died and his aunt re-married almost immediately, leaving Bukovac in the hands of a wicked step-uncle who wanted him out of the house. Bukovac was packed off to a grim home for young delinquents, and only escaped when his talent for drawing attracted the attention of staff members – who quickly realized that he should never have been sent there in the first place. Returning to Cavtat in 1871 Bukovac started training as a merchant seaman, a career that ended abruptly when he fell through a trap-door on board ship and suffered severe contusion. Convalescing at home, he set out painting the walls of his parents’ house with fanciful scenes of gardens and animals – these faithfully-restored murals can still be seen at the Bukovac House in Cavtat (see below). Bukovac’s wanderlust soon returned and in 1877 he set off with his brother to Peru, where he got a job painting the interiors of railway carriages. Moving on to San Francisco he worked in a café, painting portraits of middle-class gentlefolk in his spare time.
  • Returning home in 1877, Bukovac was taken up by local art enthusiasts who were willing to finance a period of study in Paris. He spent the next five years in the French capital, emerging with a solid reputation as an accomplished painter of society portraits and semi-nudes. His La Grande Iza, a portrayal of a fictional courtesan, was the sensation of the Paris Salon of 1882, and he was immediately taken up by Paris and London art dealers eager to promote him as a painter of mildly erotic boudoir scenes. However it was as a portraitist that Bukovac was most in demand, spending several months as painter-in-residence at the homes of rich English industrialists near Leeds and Liverpool. Back in Croatia by the mid 1890s, Bukovac became a leading light in the Zagreb art scene, agitating for the construction of a national Art Pavilion (which still survives) and painting interiors for both the University Library and the National Theatre. However he was never on good terms with the other Croatian painters of the day, and the offer of a teaching post in Prague 1903 provided him with an escape route from the backstabbing world of Croatia’s cultural elite. Solidly appreciated by the Czechs, Bukovac remained in Prague until his death in 1922. The best place to get to grips with Bukovac’s work is the Bukovac House in Cavtat, which occupies the lovingly restored stone house in which the painter grew up. All aspects of his career are covered: the family portraits are particularly adorable and touching, whilst the melodramatic canvases inspired by Dante’s inferno reveal the wilder, romantic side of Bukovac’s ever fertile imagination.
  • Works by Vlaho Bukovac from the Glen Donation Ten works by Vlaho Bukovac, one work by his daughter Jelica, a bust of the artist’s wife and a medallion with a portrait of Bukovac himsel f by Oscar Niemann. Part of the estate of Sir Alexander and Lady Zorica Glen (the latter being the step-daughter of Bukovac’s son), the works have been returned to Bukovac’s home and museum from London with the assistance of the International Trust for Croatian Monuments.
  • 2.Mladi violinist (Armando Meneghello), 1885. Bukovac was born Biagio Faggioni in the town of Cavtat south of Dubrovnik in Dalmatia . As a son born to a family of mixed Croatian and Italian ancestry, his father was an Italian Croat from Genoa , while his mother was of explicitly Croatian descent Bukovac was born in Cavtat, a small fishing on the Adriatic coast, in what is now Croatia. As a teenager he travelled the world as a seaman, but when his artistic talent was spotted, he was sponsored to go to Paris in 1877, to study under the celebrated painter Alexandre Cabanel (1823-1889). In France, Bukovac quickly found success, exhibiting at the Salon after only a year. He remained in that city until 1893, during which time he absorbed elements from a variety of trends in European art into his own style. For example in the present work we see a technique grounded in the academism of Cabanel, but features such as his loose, expressive brushwork, light palette and preference for painting en plein air demonstrates the influence of both the Barbizon school and the French Impressionists.
  • Whilst in Paris, Bukovac came to the attention of the English dealers Vicars Brothers. This firm imported many of his works to their Piccadilly gallery, and assiduously promoted his work to many of their clients throughout the country. Na Izvoru was probably commissioned by Vicars Brothers in response to the taste of their English clients, as subjects of this type, or scenes of rural life, were very popular. On his return to Zagreb in 1893 Bukovac became the leader of a group of young artists who soon won an international reputation as the Zagreb ‘colourful school’, with a brighter palette and freer technique than their predecessors. He eventually left Croatia permanently, finally settling in Vienna in 1903. In that city he continued to work and exhibit with great success, and he continued to evolve his style until he died in 1922.
  • Katarine Bibive. 1891. 60x48cm
  • 1.Dolce far niente 2.
  • Vlaho Bukovac was born in Cavtat, near Dubrovnik on July 4, 1855. He showed inclination to drawing in his early childhood, but because of his family's poverty he could not continue his education. At the age of eleven his uncle took him to the United States, where he spent four hard years. His uncle soon died. In 1871, he returned to Dubrovnik and embarked as an apprentice on a merchant ship that sailed on regular line Istanbul- Odessa-Liverpool. In 1873 he went to Latin America, where he worked as a letter drawer in a coach factory in Peru. Three years later he returned to Cavtat. He found a sponsor in the person of Medo Pucic, a poet who recommended him to the archbishop Strossmayer, a very famous and influential Croatian at that time. In 1877 he presented Strossmayer the painting Turkinja u haremu ( Turkish woman in harem ). Thanks to Strossmayer's financial support and his own savings he made it to Paris in 1877, where he entered the École des Beaux Arts. His teacher was Alexandre Cabanel. He finished his education in 1880. Bukovac appeared in public as a painter on the Salon de Paris in 1878.
  • portrait-of-a-girl
  • 1. Closeup of Vlaho Bucovac's daughter 2. self portrait
  • The Portrait of Artist’s Daughters (15×19 inches) belongs to Bukovac’s late period,when he taught at the Academy of Art in Prague. This academic subject is expressed in a quintessentially modern manner and epitomizes the fusion of the traditional and the new that lies at the heart of Bukovac’s artistic vision. Executed with luminescent short brushstrokes, it exemplifies the pointillist technique the artist embraced after 1900. Bukovac was one of Croatia’s leading turn-of-the-century artists. Academically trained under Alexandre Cabanel at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, he remained in Paris for most of the 1880s, where he became a regular exhibitor at the annual Salon. Two trips to England in 1886 and 1888, where he worked en plein air, further contributed to the gradual lightening of his palette. On his return to Zagreb in 1893, Bukovac became the leader of a group of young artists who became known as the ‘School of Colour’, in reference to the bright, impressionistic palette he brought with him from France. Forward thinking both in his art and as an individual, he was the co-founder of the Society of Croatian artists and the instigator behind the building of the Art Pavillion in Zagreb in 1898. He exhibited at the first Vienna Secession, as well as at the Venice Biennale, before becoming a teacher at the Prague Academy. Three days ago at Sotheby’s 19th century European paintings sale this painting by Croatian master Vlaho Bukovac was sold for £ 46.850 ($ 70.000). June 5, 2010
  • 1.2. Artists Father
  • crnogorka
  • Montenegro Girl, 1883 Corner of a room in Vlaho Bucovac's house Room in Vlaho Bucovac's house
  • 1 .Vlaho Bukovac, Dubravka, 1894. Detail 2.Vlaho Bukovac, Dubravka, 1894. Detail with Rajmond Kunic 3.Portret grofa Draškovića izradio je veliki hrvatski slikar Vlaho Bukovac
  • Ivan-Mestrovic Samson Fox
  • bukovac-paints-vranicany barun-vranicany
  • Portrait_Gustav_Pongratz
  • scene from Dante's inferno by Vlaho Bukovac
  • Bukovac Museum in Cavtat Isus prijatelj malenih ( Jesus, friend of the little ones ) is one of 32 paintings exhibited in the Paris period, where he was exhibiting and working for 16 years. It appeared in the Salon de Paris in 1888, and he was awarded with the Mention Honorable. The rich industrialist Samson Fox bought it for St. Robert's Catholic Church in Harrogate near Leeds, England. Sources say that Fox owned 18 paintings by Bukovac.
  • sketch-for-st-dominic. st-dominic
  • Selfportrets In 1888 and 1891 he spent longer periods in England working as a portrait painter. He went through several phases in his artistic work, which differ only in means and techniques, but not in comprehension and mastery of painting. The Zagreb period (1894-1898) was the most active part of his life. He brought fresh ideas to the artistic colony of the town, but as he was the only Croat artist educated in France he was soon confronted by the advocates of the Vienna and Munich schools. He made the famous curtain for the large paintings made for Croatian National Theatre, Gundulic's Dream and Dubravka . The Cavtat period (1898-1903) is characterized by his searching for a new means of expression and new coloristic solutions. The Prague period (1903-1922) is characterized by portraits where he concentrated more on coloristic aspects and less on the person painted. He worked there as a professor at the Academy. Bukovac died in Prague on April 23, 1922. His work comprises about 400 portraits, and more than 150 other paintings and compositions.
  • Gunduli imagining Osman, 1894, oil on canvas, 1850 x 3100 mm, Moderna galerija, Zagreb Gundulic's Dream portrays Dubrovnik's most famous seventeenth-century poet, Djivo Gundulic (1588–1638), in carefully-studied historical costume imagining his epic poem, Osman , which narrates the downfall of the Ottoman Sultan, Osman II, and his war with Poland in 1622. 22 Visions of the poem appear to the poet in the mist over the water as he looks out, aided, no doubt, by the three muses levitating rather heavily behind him. In the foggy center of the painting, a fainting woman is being abducted from her burning thatch-roofed home by several dark-skinned, turbaned Turks. Her father has collapsed just left of her, weeping helplessly. Proceeding from that sad scene and following the curve of the coastline, a multitude of nude women burst forth from the deep illusionistic perspective of the painting before a small number of pursuing Turkish soldiers. The heavy impasto of the shimmering water encases the thinly-washed bodies, trapping and freezing the women at the edge of the foreground where the viewer may regard them at leisure, while the poet remains removed and aloof on his elevated rocky barrier (fig. 10). Scenes of the sorrow of the captured and soon-to-be-captured women—in a rather jarring juxtaposition in which the crowding of one image upon another confuses the careful painterly work to establish the illusion of depth—appear behind the tree in the extreme left side of the painting like so many representations of their psychological states. The past violence of the Ottomans may very well have served as an allegory for the Imperialism of Austria-Hungary over Croatia.
  • Guslar
  • Kralj Aleksandar Obrenovic,1900 Ulje na platnu 65x91 cm
  • Alexander I (Karadjordjević) of Serbia and Yugoslavia (1888-1934)
  • Živio_kralj
  • Pokrštenje_Hrvata_Bela_Čikoš_Sesija
  • Young Artist (1914)
  • Vlaho Bucovac's painting of his daughter or wife painting
  • 1.ruder boskovic 1919 2. Vlaho Bucovac's brother
  • Bukovac Museum in Cavtat
  • Vlaho Bucovac's house Glen donation Ten works by Vlaho Bukovac, one work by his daughter Jelica, a bust of the artist’s wife and medallion with a portrait of Bukovac himself by Oscar Niemann. Part of the estate of Sir Alexander and Lady Zorica Glen (the latter being the step-daughter of Bukovac’s son), the works have been returned to Bukovac’s home and museum from London with the assistance of the International Trust for Croatian Monuments. Bukovac Museum in Cavtat
  • Self portrait, 1911
  • 1.Vlaho Bucovac's wife or daughter 2.Vlaho Bucovac's house
  • Vlaho Bukovac1

    1. 1. Vlaho Bucovac http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1261267-vlaho-bukovac1/
    2. 2. Vlaho Bukovac (Biagio Faggioni)
    3. 3. Vlaho Bukovac (Italian: Biagio Faggioni) Born 5 July 1855 Cavtat, Austria-Hungary (today's Croatia) Died 23 April 1922 (aged 66) Prague, Czechoslovakia (today's Czech Republic)
    4. 4. Bukovac was born in Cavtat, a small fishing on the Adriatic coast, in what is now Croatia. As a teenager he travelled the world as a seaman, but when his artistic talent was spotted, he was sponsored to go to Paris in 1877, to study under the celebrated painter Alexandre Cabanel (1823-1889). In France, Bukovac quickly found success, exhibiting at the Salon after only a year. He remained in that city until 1893, during which time he absorbed elements from a variety of trends in European art into his own style. On his return to Zagreb in 1893 Bukovac became the leader of a group of young artists who soon won an international reputation as the Zagreb ‘colourful school’, with a brighter palette and freer technique than their predecessors. Known both for his perceptive portraits and his grandiose history paintings, Bukovac was also subtly innovative, blending the kind of acutely-observed realism popular in the late nineteenth century with expressive techniques picked up from the French Impressionists and their followers. Vlaho Bukovac
    5. 48. Vlaho Bukovac (1855 - 1922) One of Croatia's Finest Artists
    6. 50. Sound : Operatica (Lord Vanger) – Mon amour Text and pictures: Internet Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

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